FAQs

The Most Frequently Asked Questions by Students about Student Conduct

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If I am being referred to Student Conduct, what will happen?

You will receive a letter from us asking you to make an appointment to meet with a Student Conduct staff member. The letter will also describe any charges and will include a brief description of the report. It is important to make an appointment and keep it. Ignoring the situation will not make it go away. If you do not respond, a decision can be made in the case without your input. This decision could affect your status as a student.

If I am being charged in court, why do I also have to deal with the university? Isn't this double jeopardy?

It is not double jeopardy, which only applies to the criminal court system. As a student, you are held responsible by the university for your behavior under the Student Conduct Code, rather than criminal statutes.

What if I don't show up for my meeting with the conduct officer?

The Student Conduct staff member will make a decision in the incident without the benefit of your involvement and perspective.

What if I was not aware of a rule and didn't know I was breaking it?

Lack of knowledge of a rule is not an excuse for misconduct. Every student is responsible for knowing the rules and regulations of the university. It is important for you to read the Student Conduct Code and Ralphie's Guide, and the Guide to Residence Hall Living, if you live on campus. Also, if you are unsure about any policies, ask for clarification.

What if the incident happened off campus?

The university has jurisdiction for behavior off campus. So even if it happens off campus, it may still be a violation of the Student Conduct Code, which will be handled by the Office of Student Conduct.

Can't I just lie about the situation and get away with it?

Lying is not a value of our community, and if it should be found that you lied, there can be additional disciplinary charges or consequences.

I was put on probation. What does that mean?

Probation is a specific period of time in which a student has to complete sanctions and demonstrate the ability to be a responsible member of the community. Any violation of the Student Conduct Code or the conditions of probation committed during the probationary period will result in further disciplinary action.

Will disciplinary sanctions appear on my academic transcript?

The only sanctions that appear on transcripts are suspensions and expulsions. The suspension notation lasts for the duration of the suspension, while the expulsion notation is permanent. Disciplinary probation, educational sanctions and other outcomes do not appear. In some situations, a notation of pending disciplinary action may be placed on your transcript.

What if I do not complete an assigned sanction?

Failure to complete assigned sanctions is considered a new violation. In some situations, failure to complete sanctions may result in suspension or expulsion from the university. In addition, a stop will be placed on your registration and records. Remember that sanctions are placed as a result of your violation of the Student Conduct Code, and are designed to educate you about the expectations and norms of the university community.

Will potential employers have access to my conduct record?

Your conduct record will only be accessible to them if you provide written permission allowing it. If you would like to release your information, you can access the form online, sign and return it to our office.

What are the violations of the Student Conduct Code that are most likely to result in suspension or expulsion from the university?

In no particular order:

  • sexual misconduct
  • possession and/or use of weapons (including firearms, guns, air rifles and paint guns, throwing stars, nunchucks, etc.)
  • falsely pulling a fire alarm
  • setting a fire
  • theft of a computer
  • drug sales
  • physical assault
  • provision of alcohol to minors with injury or endangerment resulting from the use of the alcohol
  • hazing
  • stalking
  • riot
  • any repeated pattern of violations

Why am I being charged an adjudication fee for going through the Student Conduct procedure?

The aim of the Office of Student Conduct is to encourage and educate students to take responsibility for their actions in the community. Students who meet with a Student Conduct hearing officer will be assessed this fee if responsible for a violation of the Student Conduct Code. The funds accrued from the fees are provided to the University of Colorado Restorative Justice Program and alcohol and drug education and prevention programs.

 

The Most Frequently Asked Questions by Parents about Student Conduct

Will I be notified if my student gets in trouble: i.e., if student is charged with violating the Student Conduct Code?

We may notify parents if their student has an alcohol or drug violation and is under the age of 21. This is allowed by the amendments to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. This act governs the release of educational records. We encourage students to speak with their parents and believe that as adults, students should take responsibility for initiating the conversation. We also encourage students to sign releases that allow us to speak with parents about a situation, so that we can all work together to resolve the issue and help the student. In addition, you may be notified if there is an imminent risk to the student's health, safety, or welfare.

If my student is charged with violating the Student Conduct Code, what happens?

The student will be asked to set a meeting with a Student Conduct staff member to go over the process. The student will attend an Administrative Hearing to discuss their involvement in the incident. After the hearing the conduct officer will review the case information and make a decision of responsible or not responsible. If a student is found responsible for violating the Student Conduct Code, they will likely face educational sanctions to help them learn from this experience. For more detailed information, please see the Student Conduct Code.

What is my role in the student conduct process? How can I help my student?

You can help to guide the student through the process and be supportive while holding the student accountable to your expectations and the university's. You can also help identify and provide necessary interventions, such as alcohol or drug evaluations, anger management, and others, so that your student can be successful at CU. Allow and expect the student to set appointments, attend meetings, and fulfill sanctions. It is usually not helpful to the educational development of the student, or resolution of the matter, for you to attempt to handle the situation for them.

Can I be in a disciplinary meeting or conference with my student?

The student may have an advisor present, who may be a parent. The role of the advisor is to support and advise the student but not to speak for or represent the student.

Do I need to hire an attorney to represent my student?

Students may have an attorney serve as an advisor but may not be represented by counsel. Students most often hire attorneys when there are criminal charges that relate to an incident.

How are sanctions decided?

Sanctions are determined by considering the following factors: nature of the violation, the student's role in the incident, the effect of the incident on others and on the student, the student's developmental and educational needs, and the student's prior disciplinary record. Mitigating and aggravating circumstances are considered.

My student was placed on probation? What does that mean?

Probation is a specific period of time in which a student has to complete sanctions and demonstrate the ability to be a responsible member of the community. Any violation of the Student Conduct Code or the conditions of probation committed during the probationary period will result in further disciplinary action.

Can my student appeal a disciplinary decision?

An appeal may only be submitted if a student was, terminated from a residence hall, suspended, or expelled from the university. The student may appeal under the following criteria: 1) Severity of sanction; 2) Process was not followed; and/or 3) There is new information available that was not available at the time of the original hearing. For more information, see Student Conduct Appeals.

If my student's case is appealed, what happens to the sanctions while the appeal is being decided?

Unless the welfare of a person or the community is threatened, all of the sanctions imposed in a case that may be appealed will not go into effect until the appeal is decided. For more information, see Student Conduct Appeals.

Does the outcome go on my student's record?

If a student is suspended from the university, a notation will be placed in the student's academic transcript for the period of the suspension. If the student is expelled, a notation will remain on the transcript permanently. For any student receiving a sanction less serious than suspension or expulsion, notations are not placed on the academic transcripts.

Will a disciplinary record keep my student from getting into law school, graduate school, etc.?

A disciplinary record does not automatically exclude a student from further study, jobs, etc. That usually depends on the type or severity of misconduct in which a student is involved. A disciplinary record may lead an admissions office to more closely scrutinize the student's application. We will only release information about a student's disciplinary record to another school or potential employer as allowed by the records policy, or with the permission of the student.

Why is a particular rule or policy in place?

Policies are designed to support the university's educational mission. They are meant to support a safe environment where people can work, study, and live without undue interference. They are also designed to build and support the academic and social community, teach students responsibility and interdependence, as well as promote moral and ethical development.

My student was charged criminally. Why go through the Student Conduct process too?

The criminal justice system and CU Student Conduct Code are not mutually exclusive. By virtue of being a student, your student is held responsible for upholding the standards of behavior in the Student Conduct Code, as well as public laws. A Conduct Code violation may be heard if the criminal case is not completed or if the criminal charges are dropped.

This incident happened off campus. Why is the university involved?

The university has an interest in maintaining a safe community and appropriate standards of conduct for its students. This includes both on-campus and off-campus behavior, which can have an impact on the university community and the university mission.

What resources are available to help my student?

For a list of various resources, including counseling, victim assistance, legal assistance and psychiatric care, see Student Conduct Resources.

I know my student could not have done this; I didn't raise my student that way. So why is my student being charged?

Developmentally this is a period of exploration, experimentation and testing for students. They may be in a period of transition from late adolescence to adulthood. They may also be away from home and the daily influence of their parents for the first time. As students are testing the beliefs and values they learned at home, they may make choices that are inconsistent with these values. Such testing is part of the developmental process and is normal. However, students must also learn that the choices they make may not be healthy and may have consequences.

How can I learn more about parent involvement at the university?

You may contact the Office of Parent Relations at 303-492-1380 or visit their web site at: www.colorado.edu/parentrelations.

Why is my student being charged an adjudication fee for going through the Student Conduct process?

The aim of the Office of Student Conduct is to encourage and educate students to take responsibility for their actions in the community. Students who meet with a Student Conduct Hearing Officer will be assessed this fee if responsible for a violation of the Student Conduct Code. The funds accrued from the fees are provided to the University of Colorado Restorative Justice Program and alcohol and drug education and prevention programs.

How can I talk to my student about alcohol and their decisions about it?

Alcohol and drugs are an important issue to discuss with your student. As parents, you have a great opportunity to impact your student’s success at this institution, and your involvement can be of tremendous influence. Please see www.colorado.edu/alcohol/parents for further information.

 
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