CLASS 

(Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey)

 
 

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Introduction

Here are a number of statements that may or may not describe your beliefs about learning physics. You are asked to rate each statement by selecting a number between 1 and 5 where the numbers mean the following:

  1. Strongly Disagree
  2. Disagree
  3. Neutral
  4. Agree
  5. Strongly Agree

Choose one of the above five choices that best expresses your feeling about the statement. If you don't understand a statement, leave it blank. If you have no strong opinion, choose 3.

Survey
  1. A significant problem in learning physics is being able to memorize all the information I need to know.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  2. When I am solving a physics problem, I try to decide what would be a reasonable value for the answer.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  3. I think about the physics I experience in everyday life.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  4. It is useful for me to do lots and lots of problems when learning physics.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  5. After I study a topic in physics and feel that I understand it, I have difficulty solving problems on the same topic.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  6. Knowledge in physics consists of many disconnected topics.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  7. As physicists learn more, most physics ideas we use today are likely to be proven wrong.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  8. When I solve a physics problem, I locate an equation that uses the variables given in the problem and plug in the values.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  9. I find that reading the text in detail is a good way for me to learn physics.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  10. There is usually only one correct approach to solving a physics problem.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  11. I am not satisfied until I understand why something works the way it does.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  12. I cannot learn physics if the teacher does not explain things well in class.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  13. I do not expect physics equations to help my understanding of the ideas; they are just for doing calculations.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  14. I study physics to learn knowledge that will be useful in my life outside of school.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  15. If I get stuck on a physics problem on my first try, I usually try to figure out a different way that works.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  16. Nearly everyone is capable of understanding physics if they work at it.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  17. Understanding physics basically means being able to recall something you've read or been shown.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  18. There could be two different correct values for the answer to a physics problem if I use two different approaches.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  19. To understand physics I discuss it with friends and other students.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  20. I do not spend more than five minutes stuck on a physics problem before giving up or seeking help from someone else.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  21. If I don't remember a particular equation needed to solve a problem on an exam, there's nothing much I can do (legally!) to come up with it.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  22. If I want to apply a method used for solving one physics problem to another problem, the problems must involve very similar situations.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  23. In doing a physics problem, if my calculation gives a result very different from what I'd expect, I'd trust the calculation rather than going back through the problem.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  24. In physics, it is important for me to make sense out of formulas before I can use them correctly.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  25. I enjoy solving physics problems.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  26. In physics, mathematical formulas express meaningful relationships among measurable quantities.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  27. It is important for the government to approve new scientific ideas before they can be widely accepted.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  28. Learning physics changes my ideas about how the world works.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  29. To learn physics, I only need to memorize solutions to sample problems.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  30. Reasoning skills used to understand physics can be helpful to me in my everyday life.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  31. We use this statement to discard the survey of people who are not reading the questions. Please select agree-option 4 (not strongly agree) for this question to preserve your answers.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  32. Spending a lot of time understanding where formulas come from is a waste of time.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  33. I find carefully analyzing only a few problems in detail is a good way for me to learn physics.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  34. I can usually figure out a way to solve physics problems.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  35. The subject of physics has little relation to what I experience in the real world.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  36. There are times I solve a physics problem more than one way to help my understanding.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  37. To understand physics, I sometimes think about my personal experiences and relate them to the topic being analyzed.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  38. It is possible to explain physics ideas without mathematical formulas.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  39. When I solve a physics problem, I explicitly think about which physics ideas apply to the problem.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  40. If I get stuck on a physics problem, there is no chance I'll figure it out on my own.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  41. It is possible for physicists to carefully perform the same experiment and get two very different results that are both correct.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered

  42. When studying physics, I relate the important information to what I already know rather than just memorizing it the way it is presented.
    Strongly Disagree12345Strongly Agree
    not answered


  43.