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3040 - Writing on Business & Society Course Descriptions

The following list is alphabetical, by instructor last name. Not every course shown below is offered every semester. Check the current Course Schedule.

REAL-WORLD APPLICATIONS, Dr. Sigman Byrd
This course aims to prepare you for thinking critically and responding effectively to the challenges you will meet in the business world. The primary text will be your writing supplemented with background readings from the course textbook. Assignments will include a variety of professional documents through which you will practice critical thinking, reading, and writing skills and learn how to address the practical needs of different audiences in a variety of rhetorical situations. Some assignments will be practical in nature and based on real-world scenarios, while other assignments will be academic and focus on public policy concerns. In addition, you will learn reader-centered writing strategies and apply them to your work and the work of your classmates in a collaborative workshop setting. You will experience how business writing is fundamentally a cooperative effort between reader and writer, an ongoing negotiation between you and your colleagues, your employer and clients.
BUSINESS WRITING, ETHICS, and SUSTAINABILITY, Douglas Dupler
Writing 3040 is an upper-division writing course that expands and refines students’ writing and communication skills. The course emphasizes critical thinking and rhetorical awareness; prepares students to write analytical, evaluative, and/or persuasive papers that incorporate research and conventions in a field of interest; extends students’ knowledge and experience of the writing process; and builds effective communication skills including oral presentation. The primary course content is writing and critical thinking, using the broad theme of “business and society” as a context for our semester-long inquiry and practice. This course aims to prepare students for the writing situations and challenges that they will encounter as professionals and educated citizens. Content will be delivered by lectures, seminar discussions, peer-review workshops and group activities, online sources, videos, guest speakers, and community-learning opportunities such as the CU Conference on World Affairs.

CROSS-CULTURAL WRITING FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS, Dr. Andrea Feldman
Cross-Cultural Writing for International Students is a section of WRTG 3020, 3030, and 3040 that is intended for non-native speakers of English who wish to enroll in an upper-division writing course. The course is taught as a rigorous writing workshop using advanced readings and materials, emphasizing critical thinking, analysis, and argumentative writing. Course readings focus on cross-cultural communication in the arts, business, and scientific fields.  Assignments will be tailored to meet the needs and interests of individual students.
WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY, Jami Frush
Course title and topic description coming soon.
WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY, Jamie Jones

The governing purpose of this course is to provide students with the necessary theoretical tools and praxis to become good writers: those that write clearly, concisely, correctly, and credibly in any context. To develop these skills, students will engage in critical thinking exercises, readings, discussions, analytical writing, professional communication, research, and oral presentations, all of which pertain to contemporary issues in business and society. In addition to guest lecturers from the Boulder business community, these activities ultimately prepare students to: understand and respond to an assignment of any nature, quickly identify and evaluate information, construct an issue based on sustained inquiry, innovative thinking, and sound, logical reasoning.

This course draws on timely discussion pieces to keep pace with changing business practices and technologies. In particular, these readings will foster critical classroom discussions by allowing for various interpretations of the intersectionalities between business, technology, society, and self. Although we address a plethora of topics, strong writing (as defined above) remains the primary goal for this class.

At points throughout the course, students will be assigned partner or group work so they can explore and master the collaborative nature of writing. Finally, because much of our class focuses on extending rhetorical awareness, students must act with professionalism and respect during any class-related work.

WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY, Dr. Peter Kratzke
This section of WRTG 3040 will emphasize what may be called practical rhetoric: what sort of decisions in business situations will be effective? Through a series of readings, we will consider larger issues about business procedure and, ultimately, citizenship. Meanwhile, after a series of shorter exercises, our three major writing assignments will involve both critical thinking and traditional forms of business writing (resumes and cover letters, memoranda, instructions, reports, and proposals). Group collaboration and oral presentation will inform our work throughout the semester. In the end, all students should leave WRTG 3040 with a thorough understanding of the writing process that they can use for any occasion in their pursuit of professional careers.
WRTING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY, Daniel Long
Course title and topic description coming soon.
WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY, Seth Myers
Course title and topic description coming soon.
EFFECTIVE BUSINESS WRITING: FORM AND FUNCTION, Dr. David Rothman
This course begins with practical forms of business writing (such as resum├ęs and application letters), moves through technical documents (executive summaries and policy memos) and culminates in a substantial research project that includes a proposal, annotated bibliography, oral presentation and research paper. The final project, like the earlier exercises, is also practical and may be either a feature-length piece of investigative journalism about a current business issue, an extended business plan for a new project, or a white paper evaluating a major challenge facing a business or industry (e.g., the natural gas industry and fracking; junk food and the obesity epidemic; internet providers and privacy issues; etc.). In addition to learning how to communicate personal business interests and goals precisely and persuasively, students also examine some of the ethical challenges that businesses now face, from regulatory environments and other legal issues to climate change, consumer safety and more.
PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION: TIGHT THINKING, TIGHT WRITING, Tobin von der Nuell
In this course you will practice successful business writing strategies, and you will do so by focusing on three main rhetorical concerns:  audience, purpose and voice.  You will critically read and discuss a variety of business articles and case studies to arm you with “data” that you then will use to frame and defend various arguments written to specific audiences.  You will create a number of business documents, ranging from memos and letters to reports.  In each, you will need to define your purpose for writing, your audience’s needs, and your method of argumentation to meet both.  The course functions as a writing workshop, wherein you will help your classmates, as they will help you, to critically work through the writing process.  You will revise often your work, and will practice developing a tight prose style. Your final project will consist of a proposal, a paper and a 10-minute Power Point presentation. Attendance and participation are vital to your success in the course.

MAKING DECISIONS, Paula Wenger
The aim of professional communication is to convey or influence the decisions that drive business. Drawing on field-specific decision-making models as well as principles of corporate social responsibility, you will hone your skills in identifying the evidence and reasoning and selecting the communication strategies that will move a particular audience to a particular course of action. We will explore the critical thinking and rhetorical analysis involved in shaping effective communication strategies, in light of the moral as well as the profit-making challenges of a global marketplace. In addition to writing a cover letter and resume, you will select a research project to develop through a range of written and oral assignments that include a project proposal, annotated bibliography, proposal, and oral presentation. Writing workshops will test your writing with an audience and sharpen your skills in collaborating and giving feedback. We will also cover revising techniques and business writing style.

WRITING ON BUSINESS & SOCIETY: DEVELOPING A MARKETABLE IDENTITY, Dr. Michael Zizzi
In this course you will learn principles, techniques and strategies that work together to aid your engagement and contribution within business/economic communities of personal relevance, by examining the intersections of business rhetoric, ethical concern, career application, digital media and use, collaboration in problem–solving groups, and civic/community engagement — all of this both in theory and practice. Strong emphasis will be placed on developing a "marketable identity" (including applying for a real opportunity) as a prospective job seeker and contributor in and out of employment contexts.