"Anticipating the Next Discoveries in Particle Physics"

June 6 - July 1, 2016

The application to attend the 2016 TASI is now closed.

Lecturers and Topics

  • Matthew Schwartz (Harvard) | QCD and Collider Physics
  • Sally Dawson (BNL) | Electroweak and Higgs Physics
  • Csaba Csaki (Cornell) | Non-supersymmetric BSM Models
  • Howard Haber (UC Santa Cruz) | Supersymmetric Theory and Models
  • Yuval Grossman (Cornell) | Flavor Physics
  • Andre de Gouvea (Northwestern) | Neutrino Physics
  • Neelima Sehgal (Stony Brook) | Cosmology -- Cosmic Microwave Background
  • Scott Dodelson (Fermilab/Chicago) | Cosmology -- Large Scale Structure
  • Matias Zaldarriaga (IAS Princeton) | Cosmology -- Theory
  • Neal Weiner (NYU) | Dark Matter -- Theory
  • Manoj Kaplinghat (UC Irvine) | Dark Matter -- Observations
  • Tracy Slatyer (MIT) | Dark Matter -- Indirect Detection
  • Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano (Northwestern) | Dark Matter -- Direct Detection
  • Maxim Pospelov (Victoria/Perimeter) | Dark Sectors
  • Tom LeCompte (Argonne) | Experimental Hadron Collider Physics
  • Kyle Cranmer (NYU) | Statistical Methods in Particle Physics Experiments
  • Markus Luty (UC Davis) | Recent Developments in Field Theory
  • Clifford Cheung (Caltech) | Introduction to Scattering Amplitudes
  • Nima Arkani-Hamed (IAS Princeton) | The Future of Particle Physics

Public lecture: Nima Arkani-Hamed

Scientific Organizers: Rouven Essig (Stony Brook University) and Ian Low (Argonne National Laboratory and Northwestern University)

Local TASI Organizer: Tom Degrand

The program will consist of a pedagogical series of lectures and seminars. Lectures will be given over a four-week period, three or four lectures per day, Monday through Friday. The audience will be composed primarily of advanced theoretical graduate students. Experimentalists with a strong background in theory are also encouraged to apply. Some post-doctoral fellows will be admitted, but preference will be given to applicants who will not have received their Ph.D. before 2016. The minimum background needed to get full benefit of TASI is a knowledge of quantum field theory (including RGEs) and familiarity with the Standard Model. Some familiarity with SUSY would be helpful. We hope to provide some subsidy, but students will need partial support from other sources. Rooms, meals, and access to all facilities will be provided at reasonable rates in beautifully located dormitories at the University of Colorado.

Applying to TASI

Applicants must submit a completed application and arrange for two professional letters of recommendation be submitted to TASI. Applicants may send potential recommenders a link to the TASI Recommendation form to submit letters.

All forms and letters were due by March 1, 2016.

Wiki

The 2016 TASI Wiki is now live. Please check the wiki often for updates as the month of June progresses.


TASI 2015 — "New Frontiers in Fields and Strings"

June 1 - 26, 2015

Lecturers and Topics

  • Joao Penedones (Porto U.): Introduction to AdS/CFT
  • Raphael Flauger (Princeton IAS): Effective Field Theory
  • Nati Seiberg (Princeton IAS): Supersymmetric Gauge Theories
  • David Simmons-Duffin (Princeton IAS): Conformal Bootstrap
  • Mark van Raamsdonk (British Columbia): Entanglement Entropy I
  • Juan Maldacena (Princeton IAS): Entanglement Entropy II
  • Eva Silverstein (Stanford): String Cosmology
  • Leonardo Senatore (Stanford): Primordial Cosmology
  • Freddy Cachazo (Perimeter): Scattering Amplitudes
  • Pedro Vieira (Perimeter): Scattering and Integrability
  • Mariangela Lisanti (Princeton): Particle Phenomenology for String Theorists I
  • Riccardo Rattazzi (Lausanne): Particle Phenomenology for String Theorists II
  • John McGreevy (UCSD): Condensed matter and AdS/CM duality
  • Joe Polchinski (KITP): The Black Hole Information Problem
  • Simone Giombi (Princeton): Higher Spin - CFT Duality
  • Carlos Mafra (Cambridge): Superstring Perturbation Theory

Scientific Organizers: Joe Polchinski (KITP Santa Barbara) and Pedro Vieira (Perimeter Institute)

Local TASI Organizer: Tom Degrand

The program will consist of a pedagogical series of lectures and seminars. Lectures will be given over a four-week period, three or four lectures per day, Monday through Friday. The audience will be composed primarily of advanced theoretical graduate students. Experimentalists with a strong background in theory are also encouraged to apply. Some post-doctoral fellows will be admitted, but preference will be given to applicants who will not have received their Ph.D. before 2015. The minimum background needed to get full benefit of TASI is a knowledge of quantum field theory (including RGEs) and familiarity with the Standard Model. Some familiarity with SUSY and string theory would be helpful. We hope to provide some subsidy, but students will need partial support from other sources. Rooms, meals, and access to all facilities will be provided at reasonable rates in beautifully located dormitories at the University of Colorado.

Applying to TASI

Applicants must submit a completed application and arrange for two professional letters of recommendation be submitted to TASI. Applicants may send potential recommenders a link to the TASI Recommendation form to submit letters.

All forms and letters were due by March 1, 2015.

Wiki

The 2015 TASI Wiki is now up and available to view. Please check the wiki often for updates as the month of June progresses.

As per the laws of the State of Colorado and the policies of the University of Colorado Boulder, all registrants should hereby be aware that some portion of the registration fee will be used to purchase alcoholic beverages.

 


TASI 2014 — "Journeys through the Precision Frontier: Amplitudes for Colliders."

June 2 - 27, 2014

Lecturers

  • Chris Quigg (Fermilab): Introduction to the Standard Model
  • Thomas Gehrmann (Zurich): Introduction to QCD
  • Zvi Bern (UCLA): Spinor-helicity and unitarity methods
  • Andrey Korytov (Florida): Experimental methods at the LHC
  • Iain Stewart (MIT): Effective field theories for QCD
  • Aida El-Khadra (Illinois): QCD on the lattice
  • Stefan Hoeche (SLAC): Parton showers and Monte Carlo simulations
  • Patrick Huber (Virginia Tech): Neutrino physics
  • Zoltan Ligeti (LBNL): Flavor physics
  • Claude Duhr (Durham): Mathematical aspects of scattering amplitudes
  • Marcus Spradlin (Brown): Amplitudes in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory
  • Chris Herzog (Stony Brook): Applied holography
  • Konstantin Matchev (Florida): Physics beyond the Standard Model at colliders
  • Tao Han (Pittsburgh): Higgs physics and beyond
  • Graciela Gelmini (UCLA): The hunt for dark matter
  • Radja Boughezal (Argonne): Precision Higgs physics
  • John Joseph Carrasco (Stanford): Novel amplitude relations
  • Salman Habib (Argonne): Cosmology in the precision era
  • Aneesh Manohar (UCSD): Factorization in QCD

Scientific Organizers: Lance Dixon (SLAC) and Frank Petriello (Northwestern and Argonne)

Local TASI Organizers: Tom Degrand and K.T. Mahanthappa

The program will consist of a pedagogical series of lectures and seminars. Lectures will be given over a four-week period, three or four lectures per day, Monday through Friday. The audience will be composed primarily of advanced theoretical graduate students. Experimentalists with a strong background in theory are also encouraged to apply. Some post-doctoral fellows will be admitted, but preference will be given to applicants who will not have received their Ph.D. before 2014. The minimum background needed to get full benefit of TASI is a knowledge of quantum field theory (including RGEs) and familiarity with the Standard Model. Some familiarity with SUSY and string theory would be helpful. We hope to provide some subsidy, but students will need partial support from other sources. Rooms, meals, and access to all facilities will be provided at reasonable rates in beautifully located dormitories at the University of Colorado.

Wiki

The 2014 TASI Wiki is now live and available for participants. Please check the wiki often for updates as the month of June progresses.

 


TASI 2013 — “Particle Physics: The Higgs Boson and Beyond”

June 3 - 28, 2013

Lecturers and Topics

  • Heather Logan (Carleton) - Higgs Bosons Within and Beyond the Standard Model
  • Frank Petriello (Northwestern) – Quantum Chromodynamics 
  • Julia Thom (Cornell) -  Experimental Analysis
  • Ben Grinstein (UCSD) - Flavor Physics
  • Gavin Salam (CERN) - Jets and Jet Substructure
  • Roni Harnik (Fermilab) - Dark matter
  • Fabio Maltoni (CP3, Louvain ) - Tools for Collider Physics
  • Graham Kribs (Oregon) - Supersymmetry
  • Sekhar Chivukula (MSU) - Composite Higgs Boson and Methods in Nonperturbative Field Theory
  • Elizabeth Simmons (MSU) - Top Quark and Electroweak Phenomenology
  • Lance Dixon (SLAC) - Spinor Amplitude Techniques
  • Max Tegmark (MIT) - Cosmology
  • George Fleming (Yale) - Lattice Gauge Theory
  • Christian Bauer (LBNL) - Effective Field Theory and Soft Collinear Effective Theory
  • Pilar Hernandez (Valencia) -  Neutrinos
  • Ian Low (Northwestern) - Particles Beyond the Standard Model
  • Tim Tait (UCI) - Extra Dimensions

Program Co-Directors

  • Bogdan Dobrescu (Fermilab)
  • Iain Stewart (MIT)

The program will consist of a pedagogical series of lectures and seminars. Lectures will be given over a four-week period, three or four lectures per day, Monday through Friday. The audience will be composed primarily of advanced theoretical graduate students. Experimentalists with a strong background in theory are also encouraged to apply. Some post-doctoral fellows will be admitted, but preference will be given to applicants who will not have received their Ph.D. before 2013. The minimum background needed to get full benefit of TASI is a knowledge of quantum field theory (including RGEs) and familiarity with the Standard Model. Some familiarity with SUSY and string theory would be helpful. We hope to provide some subsidy, but students will need partial support from other sources. Rooms, meals, and access to all facilities will be provided at reasonable rates in beautifully located dormitories at the University of Colorado.

 


TASI 2012 — "Searching for New Physics at Small and Large Scales"

June 4 - 29, 2012

Lecturers and Topics:

Particle Physics:

  • Peter Skands (CERN) - Introduction to QCD
  • Jesse Thaler (MIT) - Super-tricks for Superspace
  • Michael Peskin (Stanford) - Weak Interactions and Higgs, Theory
  • Yuri Gershtein (Rutgers) - LHC and Higgs, Experiment
  • Veronica Sanz (York& CERN) - Collider physics
  • Aaron Pierce (Michigan) - SUSY at the LHC
  • Michele Papucci (Berkeley): SUSY Model Building
  • Jesse Shelton (Yale) - Jet substructure and new physics
  • Rouven Essig (SUNY Stony Brook) - Dark Matter from Particle Physics

Cosmology

  • Edmund Bertschinger (MIT) - Introduction to Cosmology
  • Robert Caldwell (Dartmouth) - Dark Energy
  • Fabian Schmidt (Caltech) - Modified gravity
  • Julien Lesgourgues (EPFL Lausanne & CERN) - cosmological perturbations and dark matter
  • Leonardo Senatore (Stanford) - Inflation
  • Shirley Ho (CMU& Berkeley) - What can we learn from Large Scale Structure of the Universe?
  • Stefano Profumo (UC Santa Cruz) - DM constraints from astrophysical data

Public Lectures

  • Robert Caldwell
  • Michael Peskin 

Program Co-Directors: Martin Schmaltz (BU) and Elena Pierpaoli (USC)

Local Organizer: K.T. Mahanthappa

The program will consist of a pedagogical series of lectures and seminars. Lectures will be given over a four-week period, three or four lectures per day, Monday through Friday. The audience will be composed primarily of advanced theoretical graduate students. Experimentalists with a strong background in theory are also encouraged to apply. Some post-doctoral fellows will be admitted, but preference will be given to applicants who will not have received their Ph.D. before 2012. The minimum background needed to get full benefit of TASI is a knowledge of quantum field theory (including RGEs) and familiarity with the Standard Model. Some familiarity with SUSY and string theory would be helpful. We hope to provide some subsidy, but students will need partial support from other sources. Rooms, meals, and access to all facilities will be provided at reasonable rates in beautifully located dormitories at the University of Colorado. 

 


TASI 2011 — "The Dark Secrets of the Terascale"

June 6- July 1, 2011

Lecturers and Topics:

  • John Campbell (Fermilab) - Perturbative QCD and NLO Monte Carlo Simulations
  • Daniel Chung (Wisconsin) - Early Cosmology
  • John Conway (UC Davis) - Results from CMS and the Tevatron; Detector Simulation Tutorial
  • Lisa Everett (Wisconsin) - Models of Supersymmetry Breaking
  • Jonathan Feng (UC Irvine) - Astro and Particle Connections
  • Kyoungchul Kong (Kansas) - CalcHEP and PYTHIA Tutorials
  • Chris Lester (Cambridge) - Results from ATLAS; Mass and Spin Measurements
  • Zoltan Ligeti (LBL) – Heavy Flavor and CP Violation
  • Joseph Lykken (Fermilab) - The Big Questions and Colliders to Address Them
  • Stephen Martin (Northern Illinois) – Supersymmetric Theories
  • Simona Murgia (SLAC/KIPAC) - Experimental Results on Indirect Dark Detection
  • Eduardo Ponton (Columbia) - Extra Dimensions and Beyond
  • Sasha Pukhov (Moscow) - Dark Matter Calculations with MicrOMEGAs 
  • Pierre Ramond (Florida) - Journeys through the Standard Model and beyond
  • Laura Reina (Florida State) - Higgs Phenomenology
  • Tarek Saab (Florida) - Experimental Results on Direct Dark Matter Detection
  • Jay Wacker (SLAC) - Interesting Anomalies and Models to Address Them
  • Lian-Tao Wang (University of Chicago) - Collider Techniques

Public Lectures

  • Pierre Ramond - Mathematics, Physics and the LHC (June 9)
  • Jonathan Feng - Dark Matter (June 21)

Program Co-Directors: Konstantin Matchev (Florida), Timothy Tait (UCI)

The program will consist of a pedagogical series of lectures and seminars. Lectures will be given over a four-week period, three or four lectures per day, Monday through Friday. The audience will be composed primarily of advanced theoretical graduate students. Experimentalists with a strong background in theory are also encouraged to apply. Some post-doctoral fellows will be admitted, but preference will be given to applicants who will not have received their Ph.D. before 2011. The minimum background needed to get full benefit of TASI is a knowledge of quantum field theory (including RGEs) and familiarity with the Standard Model. Some familiarity with SUSY and string theory would be helpful. We hope to provide some subsidy, but students will need partial support from other sources. Rooms, meals, and access to all facilities will be provided at reasonable rates in beautifully located dormitories at the University of Colorado. 

 


TASI 2010 — “String theory and its Applications: From meV to the Planck Scale”

June 1-25, 2010

Lecturers and Topics:

Strings and Particle Physics:

  • Thomas Banks (Rutgers/UCSC) - Holography, Supersymmetry and Effective Gravitational Field Theory
  • Mirjam Cvetic (U of Penn) - String Vacua and D-branes: Perturbative and non-perturbative techniques
  • Frederik Denef (Harvard) - Vacua
  • Michael Dine (UCSC) - What LHC might tell us about String Theory
  • Jason Nielsen (UCSC) - LHC Experiments
  • Joseph Polchinski (KITP) - Introduction to Gauge-Gravity Duality
  • Nathan Seiberg (IAS) - Aspects of Supersymmetry
  • Matthew Strassler (Rutgers) - Theoretical Particle Physics at Hadron Colliders: An Introduction
  • Washington Taylor (MIT) - The scope of the landscape: Supergravity and string vacua in 10D, 6D and 4D

AdS/CFT Applications:

  • Steven Gubser (Princeton) - Applications of the Gauge-string Duality to High-temperature and Low-temperature systems
  • Sung-Sik Lee (McMaster U) - Emergent Supersymmetry and String in Condensed Matter Systems
  • Hong Liu (MIT) - From Black Holes to Strange Metals: Many-body Physics through a Gravitational Lens
  • Shiraz Minwalla (TIFR) - Non-linear Fluid Dynamics from Gravity
  • Krishna Rajagopal (MIT) - Quark-Gluon Plasma in QCD, at RHIC and LHC, and in String Theory
  • Subir Sachdev (Harvard) - Quantum Phase Transitions: from Antiferromagnets and Superconductors to Black Holes
  • Dam Tanh Son (U of Washington) - Holography for Strongly Coupled Media

Program Co-Directors: Michael Dine (UCSC), Thomas Banks (Rutgers/UCSC) and Subir Sachdev (Harvard)

The program will consist of a pedagogical series of lectures and seminars. Lectures will be given over a four-week period, three or four lectures per day, Monday through Friday. The audience will be composed primarily of advanced theoretical graduate students. Experimentalists with a strong background in theory are also encouraged to apply. Some post-doctoral fellows will be admitted, but preference will be given to applicants who will not have received their Ph.D. before 2010. The minimum background needed to get full benefit of TASI is a knowledge of quantum field theory (including RGEs) and familiarity with the Standard Model. Some familiarity with SUSY and string theory would be helpful. We hope to provide some subsidy, but students will need partial support from other sources. Rooms, meals, and access to all facilities will be provided at reasonable rates in beautifully located dormitories at the University of Colorado. 

 


TASI 2009 — “Physics of the Large and the Small”

June 1-26, 2009

Lecturers and Topics:

Particle Physics:

  • Hsin-Chia Cheng (Davis) - Introduction to extra dimensions
  • Roberto Contino (CERN) - The Higgs as a Pseudo-Goldstone boson
  • Patrick Fox (Fermilab) - Supersymmetry and the MSSM
  • Tony Gherghetta (Melbourne) - Warped extra dimensions and AdS/CFT
  • Eva Halkiadakis (Rutgers) - Introduction to the LHC experiments
  • Patrick Meade (IAS) - Gauge mediation of supersymmetry breaking
  • Maxim Perelstein (Cornell) - Introduction to collider physics
  • Gilad Perez (Weizmann Inst.) - Flavor physics
  • David Shih (IAS) - Dynamical supersymmetry breaking
  • Witold Skiba (Yale) - Effective theories and electroweak precision constraints
  • Kathryn Zurek (Fermilab) - Unexpected signals at the LHC

Cosmology:

  • Rachel Bean (Cornell) - Dark Energy
  • Daniel Baumann (Harvard) - Inflation
  • Manoj Kaplinghat (Irvine) - Large Scale Structure
  • Elena Pierpaoli (USC) - Cosmic Microwave Background
  • Richard Schnee (Syracuse) - Dark Matter Experiment
  • Michael Turner (Chicago) - Introduction to Cosmology
  • Neal Weiner (NYU) - Dark Matter Theory

Program Co-Directors: Csaba Csaki (Cornell) and Scott Dotelson (Fermilab)

The program will consist of a pedagogical series of lectures and seminars. Lectures will be given over a four-week period, three or four lectures per day, Monday through Friday. The audience will be composed primarily of advanced theoretical graduate students. Experimentalists with a strong background in theory are also encouraged to apply. Some post-doctoral fellows will be admitted, but preference will be given to applicants who will not have received their Ph.D. before 2009. The minimum background needed to get full benefit of TASI is a knowledge of quantum field theory (including RGEs) and familiarity with the Standard Model. Some familiarity with SUSY and string theory would be helpful. We hope to provide some subsidy, but students will need partial support from other sources. Rooms, meals, and access to all facilities will be provided at reasonable rates in beautifully located dormitories at the University of Colorado. 

 


TASI 2008 — “The Dawn of the LHC Era”

June 2-27, 2008

Lecturers and Topics:

  • Howie Baer (FSU) - Collider Signal II: Missing energy including SUSY, Tp, KKp etc., and dark matter connection
  • Marcela Carena (FNAL) - Collider Signal III: SM/SUSY Higgs searches at LHC, etc.
  • Luc M. Demortier (Rockefeller) - Data treatments, signal/backgrounds, statistics
  • Bogdan Dobrescu (FNAL) - Intro to extra dimensions: ADD, UED, RS, and dual to TC, etc.
  • Scott Dodelson (FNAL) - WMAP, SDSS, other observations; cosmological parameters
  • Concha Gonzalez-Garcia (SUNY-Stony Brook/ICREA) - Theory of neutrino masses and oscillations, Majorana mass, phenomenology and LHC
  • Yual Grossman (Cornell) - SM flavor structure; quark mass, mixing and CPV, connection to LHC
  • Dan Hooper (FNAL) - Direct and indirect DM searches, and connection to collider physics
  • David E. Kaplan (Johns Hopkins) - Non-standard: U(1), SUL(2) x SUR(2), SU(5), SO(10), etc.
  • Will Kinney (SUNY-Buffalo) - Inflation, density perturbation, BBN, baryogenesis/leptogenesis
  • Paul Langacker (IAS) - Intro to the SM; EW precision physics
  • Lynn Orr (Rochester) - PDF, jets, QCD processes and QCD radiative corrections
  • Tilman Plehn (Edinburgh) - Kinematics to dynamics; signals/backgrounds; calculational tools/packages
  • Kate Scholberg (Duke) - Super K, SNO, Kamland, ν-less double β-decay, etc., etc.
  • Yuri Shirman (UC-Irvine) - Intro to SUSY; soft breaking parameters; SUSY breaking models and mediations
  • Gary Shiu (Madison) - Intro to strings; attempts for models; brane world, etc.
  • Tim Tait (Argonne/Northwestern) - Collider Signal I: Resonances--,Z', W', RS, lepton-quark/R-parity breaking, asymmetries
  • Tom Weiler (Vanderbilt) - Astro particle physics, AUGER, ν- telescopes etc., and new physics search
  • Peter Wittich (Cornell) - Accelerators/detectors, objects, sample searches and all that theorists should know
  • John Womersley (Sci & Tech Facilities Council, UK) - Public lecture: “Revealing the Quantum Universe – the Large Hadron Collider”

Program Co-Directors: Tao Han (UW - Madison) and Robin Erbacher (UC - Davis)

The program will consist of a pedagogical series of lectures and seminars. Lectures will be given over a four-week period, three or four lectures per day, Monday through Friday. The audience will be composed primarily of advanced theoretical graduate students. Experimentalists with a strong background in theory are also encouraged to apply. Some post-doctoral fellows will be admitted, but preference will be given to applicants who will not have received their Ph.D. before 2008. The minimum background needed to get full benefit of TASI is a knowledge of quantum field theory (including RGEs) and familiarity with the Standard Model. Some familiarity with SUSY and string theory would be helpful. We hope to provide some subsidy, but students will need partial support from other sources. Rooms, meals, and access to all facilities will be provided at reasonable rates in beautifully located dormitories at the University of Colorado. 

 


TASI 2007 — "String Universe"

May 28 - June 22, 2007

Lecturers and Topics: 

  • Mina Aganagic (Berkeley)—Topological Strings and Applications
  • Nima Arkani-Hamed (Harvard)—Fundamental Physics, Cosmology and the Landscape
  • David Berenstein (UCSB)—Topics in AdS/CFT
  • Raphael Bousso (Berkeley)—Cosmology and the Landscape
  • Claudio Campagnari (UCSB)—LHC Physics: An Experimentalist's Perspective
  • Paolo Creminelli (ICTP)—Topics in Cosmology
  • Eric D'Hoker (UCLA)—SUSY Gauge Theories and AdS/CFT
  • Steve Gubser (Princeton)—AdS/CFT and RHIC Physics
  • Ken Intriligator (UCSD)—Supersymmetry Breaking
  • Shamit Kachru (Stanford)—String Compactification
  • David Kutasov (Chicago)—Branes and Field Theory
  • Hong Liu (MIT)—Strings, Blackholes and Heavy Ion Collisions
  • Lisa Randall (Harvard)—TBA
  • Martin Schmaltz (Boston)—Beyond the Standard Model Particle Physics
  • Eva Silverstein (Stanford)—The Many Dimensions of String Duality
  • David Tong (Cambridge)—Solitons and Low-dimensional Gauge Theories
  • Johannes Walcher (IAS)—Calabi—Yau Universe 
  • Barton Zwiebach (MIT)—Analytic Solutions in Open String Field Theory
  • and others

The program will consist of a pedagogical series of lectures and seminars. Lectures will be given over a four-week period, three or four lectures per day, Monday through Friday. The audience will be composed primarily of advanced theoretical graduate students. Experimentalists with a strong background in theory are also encouraged to apply. Some post-doctoral fellows will be admitted, but preference will be given to applicants who will not have received their Ph.D. before 2007. The minimum background needed to get full benefit of TASI is a knowledge of quantum field theory (including RGEs) and familiarity with the Standard Model. Some familiarity with SUSY and string theory would be helpful. We hope to provide some subsidy, but students will need partial support from other sources. Rooms, meals, and access to all facilities will be provided at reasonable rates in beautifully-located dormitories at the University of Colorado. 

 


TASI 2006 — "Exploring New Frontiers Using Colliders and Neutrinos"

June 4 - 30, 2006

Lecturers and Topics

  • Kaustubh Agashe ( Syracuse) - Extra Dimensions
  • Kaladi Babu ( Oklahoma State) - Supersymmetric Models
  • Marco Battaglia (LBL) - International Linear Collider
  • John Beacom ( Ohio State) - Astrophysical Aspects of Neutrinos
  • Zvi Bern (UCLA) - QCD
  • Mu-Chun Chen (FNAL) - Leptogenesis
  • Janet Conrad ( Columbia) - Experimental Aspects of Neutrinos
  • John Conway (UC Davis) - Experiments at LHC
  • Sally Dawson (BNL) - Introduction to the Standard Model
  • Keith Dienes ( Arizona) - Strings
  • Scott Dodelson (FNAL) - Cosmology
  • Keith Ellis (FNAL) - Collider Physics
  • George Fuller (UCSD) - Neutrino Astrophysics
  • Boris Kayser (FNAL) - CP Violation and Neutrinos
  • Manfred Lindner ( Munich) - Long Base Line Neutrino Experiments
  • Rabindra Mohapatra ( Maryland) - Neutrino Theory
  • Michael Peskin (SLAC) - Introduction to Supersymmetry
  • Thomas Rizzo (SLAC) - Extra Z Bosons
  • David Rainwater ( Rochester) - Searching for the Higgs Boson
  • Alexei Smirnov (ICTP) - Neutrino Phenomenology
  • Petr Vogel (CalTech) - Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

The program will consist of a pedagogical series of lectures and seminars. Lectures will be given over a four-week period, three or four lectures per day, Monday through Friday. The audience will be composed primarily of advanced theoretical graduate students. Experimentalists with a strong background in theory are also encouraged to apply. Some post-doctoral fellows will be admitted, but preference will be given to applicants who will not have received their Ph.D. before 2006. The minimum background needed to get full benefit of TASI is a knowledge of quantum field theory (including RGEs) and familiarity with the Standard Model. Some familiarity with SUSY would be helpful. We hope to provide some subsidy, but students will need partial support from other sources. Rooms, meals, and access to all facilities will be provided at reasonable rates in beautifully-located dormitories at the University of Colorado. 

 


TASI 2005 — "The Many Dimensions of String Theory"

June 5 - July 1, 2005

Lecturers:

  • Mina Aganagic (Berkeley)
  • Raphael Bousso (Berkeley)
  • Shanta DeAlwis (Colorado)
  • Lance Dixon (SLAC)
  • Michael Douglas (Rutgers)
  • Gia Dvali (NYU)
  • Sergei Gukov (Harvard)
  • Joanne Hewett (SLAC)
  • Shamit Kachru (Stanford/SLAC)
  • Gordon Kane (Michigan)
  • Igor Klebanov (Princeton)
  • Samir Mathur (Ohio State)
  • Hitoshi Murayama ( Berkeley)
  • Joe Polchinski (KITP, UCSB)
  • Eva Silverstein (Stanford/SLAC)
  • David Tong (DAMTP, Cambridge)
  • Henry Tye (Cornell)
  • Angel Uranga ( Madrid)
  • Herman Verlinde (Princeton)
  • Matias Zaldarriaga (Harvard)

Topics:

  • AdS/CFT and QCD
  • Black Holes and String Theory
  • Brane Inflation
  • Cascading Gauge Theories and Their String Duals
  • Collider Physics
  • Early Universe Cosmology and Astrophysics
  • EWSB and Physics beyond the Standard Model
  • Holography and Cosmology
  • Infrared Modifications of Gravity
  • Noncritical Strings
  • Statistics of String Vacua
  • String Compactifications and Model Building
  • Topological Strings and Dualities

The program will consist of a pedagogical series of lectures and seminars. Lectures will be given over a four-week period, three or four lectures per day, Monday through Friday. The audience will be composed primarily of advanced theoretical graduate students. Experimentalists with a strong background in theory are also encouraged to apply. Some post-doctoral fellows will be admitted, but preference will be given to applicants who will not have received their Ph.D. before 2005. The minimum background needed to get full benefit of TASI is a knowledge of quantum field theory (including RGEs) and familiarity with the Standard Model. Some familiarity with SUSY would be helpful. We hope to provide some subsidy, but students will need partial support from other sources. Rooms, meals, and access to all facilities will be provided at reasonable rates in beautifully-located dormitories at the University of Colorado.