RULES, POLICIES AND PROCEDURES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, BOULDER, 80309-0390
April 2006

 This document consists of two parts:
          I.  Rules
         II.  Policies and Procedures
                  A.  Undergraduate curricula and requirements
                  B.   Graduate curricula and requirements
                  C.  Departmental committees
                  D.  General
Rules
Rule 1
Unless otherwise specified in these Rules, Policies, and Procedures, Departmental meetings will be  carried out in accord with the latest edition of Roberts’ Rules of Order.

Rule 2
The following procedure is required to adopt, amend, or delete an item in the Rules:
            A.  A notice of motion containing the complete text of the motion must be presented to the voting faculty at least one week before the faculty meeting at which the proposed motion is moved.  This notice may be made by paper or email distribution.
            B.   Passage by the faculty (voice vote or show of hands) with a simple majority) of a motion and second to have the faculty vote on the proposed motion by a Written Ballot.
            C.  Passage by a two-thirds majority on a Written Ballot vote.

Rule 3
The Rules, Policies and Procedures of the Department of Physics shall be reviewed and updated as necessary, no less often than once every three years and shall be available from the Departmental home pages.

Rule 4
The minutes of each Departmental regular or special faculty meeting shall be kept and made available from the Departmental home page.  If the faculty votes to keep no minutes at a meeting a record of this action shall be entered with the next recorded minutes.

Rule 5
Additions, changes, or deletions to the Policies and Procedures require a one-week notice of motion, a second and a simple majority vote.

Rule 6
The required notices of motion for changes in the Rules or the Policies and Procedures may be suspended temporarily by a two-thirds majority voice vote.

Rule 7
Definitions: a) The Regular Faculty consists of the Assistant, Associate, and Full Professors rostered in the Department of Physics.

  Special Faculty  may be appointed.  All Special faculty are expected to be continuously and actively involved in the Department’s programs of teaching and research and may serve on Departmental committees.  Excepting Professors Emeritus and Faculty on joint appointment, appointments to the Special Faculty shall be for terms not exceeding three years, save for those Professors Attendant Rank or Research professors who have been granted the implication of ‘contract tenure’ by vote of the Department.
         A)  Emeritus professors of this Department (nonvoting)
         B)  Professors on joint appointment with other academic departments who are not rostered in this Department (voting)
         C)  Professors on joint appointment with other academic departments who are not rostered in this Department (non-voting)
         D)  Professors Adjoint (voting), (any rank)
         E)   Professors  Adjoint (non-voting), (any rank)
         F)   Attendant Rank Professors (voting)
         G)  Attendant Rank Professors (non-voting)
         H)  Lecturers
         I)    Visiting Professors
         J)Research Professors (voting)
        K) Instructors and Senior Instructors (voting)(For  definitions, see the current edition of the Faculty Handbook.)

Rule 8
Definition:  The Voting Faculty consists of the Regular Faculty plus the following Special Faculty, who may be given one half vote or one full apiece by majority vote of the faculty upon their appointment or reappointment
         A)  Professors on joint appointment (voting)
         B)  Professors Adjoint (voting); voting Professors Adjoint assume non-voting status upon retiring from their parent organization.
         C)  Attendant Rank Professors (voting)
        D) Senior Instructors(voting)
        E) Research Professors (voting)

Rule 9
Limitation:  No appointment or reappointment may be made to the voting Special Faculty if the number of voting Special Faculty would then exceed one-third of the number of Regular Faculty members.

Rule 10
Faculty reviews
      A) Annual Reviews shall be carried out according to University criteria and schedules.  The Chair shall offer to meet individually with each faculty member to discuss that member’s performance, the evaluations, and the goals and plans for that faculty member for the coming year.
     B)Post-tenure Reviews shall be carried out according to University  criteria and schedules.  These reviews shall be part of the Annual Review process, with the addition of a statement of future plans by the reviewed faculty member.

Rule 11
Definition:  In any meeting of the Faculty, a quorum exists if more than one half of the Regular Faculty, excluding those on leave, are present.

Rule 12
Voting:
         A)     In voice or hand votes in meetings each member of the Regular and Voting Special Faculty present has one vote.  No proxy votes are allowed.
         B)     A motion to require a written ballot on a motion on the floor takes precedence over the motion on the floor and passes if it receives eight affirmative votes.  Rule 13.d defines the method for this written ballot.
         C)     In all written ballot voting, members of the Regular Faculty shall have one vote each.  Other members of the Voting Faculty shall have one vote or one-half vote ., according to the voting status conferred as in Rule 9.
        
         D)     The Written Ballot:
                  i)    The written ballot shall be a secret ballot.
                  ii)   Ballots and ballot envelopes shall be distributed to all voting faculty eligible to vote on the issue  or by email to faculty not present on the campus at the time of the ballot. A statement of the due date for the ballot will be provided with the ballot.
                  iiiEach written ballot shall be identified as to whether the voter casts one vote or one-half vote.
                  iv)  The deadline for the return of ballots shall be at least five days after they are distributed.
                  v)   Faculty members not on campus may submit their votes by email to the Chair or designate, who will remove identifying information and place the ballot in a sealed envelope with a notation as to whether it is a full or half vote.
                  vi)  After  the deadline for the receipt of the ballots, the ballot envelopes shall be opened and the ballots counted in the presence of at least three members of the Regular Faculty.
                  vii)The number of “eligible votes” is the sum of the whole and half votes of the Voting Faculty who are eligible to vote on the issue.
                  viii) Ballots turned in without a clear expression of the voter’s choice, or ballots marked to indicate that the voter abstains, shall not be counted as votes cast.
                  ix)  A simple majority is more than 50 percent of the votes cast.
                  x)   A two-thirds majority is defined as one third of the following sum:  the number of eligible votes plus the number of votes cast.
                  xi)  Ballots shall be preserved for at least two weeks after the results of the balloting have been announced.


Rule 13
Lecturers may be appointed by the Chair,  for a first one-year term.   Lecturers who have established a successful extended relationship with the Department may be appointed for terms of up to three years with the advice and consent of the Chairman’s Advisory Committee.

Rule  14
Appointment to the Research Professor ranks is made by the Graduate School.  Nominations shall be forwarded to the Graduate School by the Chair with the advice and consent of the Chairman’s Advisory Committee.

Rule 15
Appointments to the Attendant Rank titles are for individuals whose qualifications are comparable  to those of the corresponding regular faculty titles, but who are supported by grant, contract or other non-general University funds.  Appointments as Assistant Professor Attendant Rank are intended to be of limited total duration, in no case longer than seven years.  Appointments to Associate Professor or Professor Attendant Rank may be of limited terms or can carry the implication of “contract tenure”.  In the latter case the Department agrees that the appointment is intended to continue as long as sufficient funds are available from external sources to support the salary and the research program of the named person.

Rule 16
Excepting the appointment of a Lecturer or an Emeritus Professor, a favorable Departmental recommendation for an appointment, a reappointment, a promotion, or a decision on the early award of tenure will be transmitted to the Dean only if it has been approved on a written ballot by a two-thirds majority of the Regular Faculty.  Independent of the outcome, a recommendation bearing on a mandated tenure review or a comprehensive reappointment review will be forwarded to the Dean together with the results of the balloting.  Only tenured Voting Faculty, including members of the Regular Faculty and those on joint appointments with other academic departments, are eligible to vote on recommendations regarding the awarding of tenure.  This limitation applies to all tenured appointments to the faculty—and to promotions in which the award of tenure and the change in rank are linked.  Otherwise, all Regular and Voting-Special Faculty are eligible to vote in cases of appointment, reappointment, and promotion.  Only voting Full Professors are eligible to vote on promotion to that title.Excepting the individual(s) to be discussed, all ranks may participate in faculty meeting discussions of appointments, reappointments, promotions, and/or the awarding of tenure.

Rule 17 Election of the Chair
  A)  A Chairmanship Election Committee shall be named approximately 10 months in advance of the expiration of the term of office of the Chairman or will be named as soon as possible after notification that the office will become vacant if that vacancy will occur before the end of the normal term.  This Committee shall have three members, named by the Chair with the advice and consent of the Chair’s Advisory Committee.
  B) This Committee will conduct the election according to the following methods:
    i) Each member of the Voting Faculty will be asked to nominate no more than two candidates from the Regular Faculty of this Department.
   ii)Nomination of candidates from outside this Department shall be by a petition carrying ten or more signatures of the Regular Faculty.
   iii)The Committee will create an alphabetically ordered slate of the five candidates who are willing to serve with the largest number of nominations.
   iv)After the slate is announced, other willing members of the Regular Faculty may be added to the slate by petitions signed by ten or more members of the Voting Faculty
   v) Candidates will be listed alphabetically on all ballots.
   vi) Each member of the Voting Faculty will be asked to cast a written vote for one candidate.
   vii) To be elected, a candidate must receive two thirds of the eligible votes
   viii) If the first ballot does not select the new Chair, voting will be carried out as in vi) and vii) above in the following sequence.
       a) A new ballot will list the three top candidates from the first ballot
       b) If the two-thirds majority is not obtained on the second ballot, a third ballot will list the two top candidates from that ballot
       c) If no candidate obtains two thirds of the votes on the third ballot, a fourth ballot shall be prepared with only the name of the top candidate from the third ballot, and Voting Faculty shall be asked to vote yes or no
      d) If the fourth ballot does not result in a two thirds majority of yes votes, a fifth ballot shall be prepared with only the name of the second candidate on the third ballot, and Voting Faculty shall be asked to vote yes or no for that candidate.
      e) If this sequence fails to select a chair, the process shall be repeated beginning with Rule 17.B.above.
 See the separate posting for the Policies and procedures

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, BOULDER, 80309-0390
II. Policies and Procedures                                                                            December 29, 1987

A.  Undergraduate Curricula and Requirements

II.     A.     Undergraduate Curricula and Requirements.
                  To be awarded the specified degree a student must meet the following requirements of the Department of Physics.  In addition, the student will also have to meet the requirements of his or her college.  Except for the total hours required for the Bachelor’s degrees, none of the requirements listed below may be satisfied with Pass/Fail grades and at least 12 hours of upper-division Physics courses must be taken at the University of Colorado, Boulder.  The two departmental advising committees (A&S and Engineering Physics) are responsible for the interpretation and application of their respective degree requirements, including the acceptability of substitutions.  Decisions may be appealed to the Departmental Faculty.

         1.      B.A. in Physics (College of Arts & Sciences) – Plan 1
                        This degree program is intended to prepare a student for Graduate work in Physics or for employment as a physicist.  The student must pass the following courses or their equivalents:
                 
                  Math     1300 (130)                                     Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1
                                      2300 (230)                                      Analytic Geometry and Calculus 2
                                      2400 (240), and                             Analytic Geormetry and Caculus 3
                        APPM   2360 (A.Math 236) or both        Linear Algebra & Differential Eq
                        Math      3130 (313)                                    Introduction of Linear Algebra
                                       4430 (443)                                     Ordinary Differential Equation        
                        Chem     1111 (103) and 1131 (106) or  General Chemistry
                                       1151 (107) and 1171 (108)        Honors General Chemistry
                        Phys      1110 (111), 1120 (112), and      General Physics
                                       1140 (114)                                     Experimental Physics
                        Phys      2130 (213)                                     General Physics
                                       2140 (214), and                            Methods of Theoretical Physics
                                      2150 (215)                                      Experimental Physics
                        Phys      3330 (317), 3340 (318)               Junior Laboratory
                                        3210 (321)                                    Analytical Mechanics
                                   3220 (322)                                         Quantum Mechanics
                                   3310 (331), 3320 (332), and          Prin. Of Electricity & Magnetism
                                   4230 (341)                                         Thermodynamics & Stat. Mech.
                        Phys      4410 (491), 4420 (492), and      Atomic & Nuclear Physics
                                    4430 (495)                                        Senior Laboratory
                        At least 2 hours from:
                        Phys        3450 (305)                                   History & Philosophy of Physics
                                       4340 (446)                                 Solid-State Physics
                                      4510 (451)                                       Optics
                                        4610 (461), 4620 (462)              Physics Honors
                                        4440 (496)                                    Senior Laboratory
                                        5030 (503), 5040 (504)              Intermediate Math-Physics I, II
                                     5770 (585)                                       Gravitational Theory
                                     4840/4850/4860 (940)  Independent Study
                                     APAS 5700 (560),                          Intro to Stellar Astronomy
                                                                                                                & Stellar Interiors

                                or another course approved by a departmental advisor.

                  2.  B.A. in Physics (College of Arts and Sciences)  - Plan 2
                       This degree program is intended to prepare a student for work in an interdisciplinary area but not necessarily for Graduate school.  The student must pass the following courses or their equivalents:

                  Math     1300 (130)                                   Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1
                                2300 (230)                                   Analytic Geometry and Calculus 2
                                2400 (240), and                           Analytic Geormetry and Caculus 3
                  APPM   2360 (A.Math 236) or both         Linear Algebra & Differential Eq
                  Math      3130 (313)                                  Introduction of Linear Algebra
                                4430 (443)                                   Ordinary Differential Equation         
                  Chem     1111 (103) and 1131 (106) or    General Chemistry
                                1151 (107) and 1171 (108)         Honors General Chemistry
                  Phys       1110 (111), 1120 (112), and      General Physics
                                1140 (114)                                   Experimental Physics
                  Phys       2130 (213)                                  General Physics
                                 2140 (214), and                          Methods of Theoretical Physics
                                 2150 (215)                                  Experimental Physics
                  Phys       3330 (317), 3340 (318)              Junior Laboratory
                                 3210 (321)                                  Analytical Mechanics
                                 3220 (322)                                  Quantum Mechanics
                                 3310 (331), 3320 (332), and      Prin. Of Electricity & Magnetism
                                 4230 (341)                                  Thermodynamics & Stat. Mech.

                  At least 3 hours from

                  Phys       3340 (318)                                  Junior Laboratory
                                 4340 (446)                                  Solid-State Physics
                                 4510 (451)                                  Optics
                                 4610 (461), 4620 (462)              Physics Honors
                                 4410 (491)                                  Atomic and Nuclear Physics
                                 4430 (495)                                  Senior Laboratory
                                 4810/4820/4830 (497, 498, 499)Special Topics in Physics
                                 5010 (501)                                  Health Physics
                                 5030 (503), 5040 (504)              Intermediate Math-Physics I, II
                                 5770 (585)                                  Gravitational Physics
                                 4840/4850/4860 (940)               
                                 APAS 5700 (560)                      Intro. To Stellar Astronomy
                                                                                     & Stellar Interiors

                  or another course approved by a departmental advisor.
        

                  Two additional laboratory courses, not necessarily in Physics.
                  An additional 12 hours of interdisciplinary courses approved by the departmental A& S advising committee.

                  3.  B.A. in Physics (College of Arts and Sciences)  - Plan 3
                       This degree program is intended to prepare a student for a State secondary education teaching certificate.  The student must pass the following courses or their equivalents:

                            31 hours in Education, as required for certification
                      
                  Math     1300 (130)                                   Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1
                                2300 (230)                                   Analytic Geometry and Calculus 2
                                2400 (240), and                           Analytic Geormetry and Caculus 3
                  APPM   2360 (A.Math 236) or both         Linear Algebra & Differential Eq
                  Math      3130 (313)                                  Introduction of Linear Algebra
                                4430 (443)                                   Ordinary Differential Equation         
                  Chem     1111 (103) and 1131 (106) or    General Chemistry
                                (1151 (107) and 1171 (108))       Honors General Chemistry
                  Phys       1110 (111), 1120 (112), and      General Physics
                                 1150 (115)                                  Experimental Physics
                  Phys       2130 (213)                                  General Physics
                                 2140 (214), and                          Methods of Theoretical Physics
                                 2160 (216)                                  Experimental Physics
                  Phys        3330 (317),                                Junior Laboratory
                                 3210 (321), and                          Analytical Mechanics
                                 3310 (331)                                  Prin. Of Electricity & Magnetism

                        Two semesters of Biology
                        Two semesters of Earth Science (Geology or Physical Geography)

                  4.  B.A. in Computer Applications (College of Arts and Sciences)

                        A distributed studies program called “Computer Applications in Physics” is available.  This program consists of a total of 61 semester hours – 30 hours in Computer Science and 31 hours in Physics.  The grade-point average in Physics must be at least 2.0; 31 hours of work must carry grades of “C” or better; 15 hours must be in upper-division courses in which grades of “C” or better have been obtained.  (Similar requirements apply for Computer Science.  Please consult the Computer Science Department.)  The required Physics courses are as follows:

         Phys 1110-4 (111)                                  General Physics
         Phys 1120-4 (112)                                  General Physics
         Phys 1140-1 (114)                                  Experimental Physics
         Phys 2130-3 (213)                                  Methods of theoretical Phys.
         Phys 2150-1 (215)                                  Experimental Physics
         Phys 3330-2 (317)                                  Junior Laboratory
         Phys 3210-3 (321)                                  Analytical Mechanics
         Phys 3310-3 (331)                                  Electricity & Magnetism
         Phys 4230-3 (341)                                  Thermodynamics & Stat. Mechanics

                        In addition, one of the following two courses is required:

         Phys 3220-2 (318)                                  Quantum Mechanics
         Phys 3220-3 (332)                                  Electricity and Magnetism

                        In addition, a minimum of 1 hour must be taken from the following list:
                       
            Phys 3340-2 (318)                               Junior Laboratory
            Phys 3220-3 (322)                               Analytical Mechanics & Quantum Mechanics
                                                                        (if not presented as a required cours)
            Phys 3320-3 (332)                               Electricity & Magnetism
                                                                        (if not presented as a required course)
            Phys 4340-3 (446)                               Solid State Physics
            Phys 4510-3 (451)                               Light
            Phys 4610-2 (461), 4620-2 (462)        Physics Honors
            Phys 4410-3 (491)                               Atomic & Nuclear Physics I
            Phys 4430-2 (495)                               Senior Laboratory
            Phys 4810, 4820, 4830          
               (497, 498, 499)                                 Special Topics in Physics
            Phys 5010-3 (501)                               Health Physics
            Phys 5030-3 (503), 5040-3 (504)        Intermediate Math-Physics
                                                                        (Same as Math 5030 (553), 5040 (554))
            APAS 5700-3 (560)                            Intro to Astrophysics
            Phys 5770-3 (585)                               Gravitational Theory
            Phys 4840, 4850, 4860 (940)              Independent Study


                  5.  B.S. in Engineering Physics (College of Engineering and Applied Science) – Plan 4
                       These requirements also apply to students earning double degrees.  The student must successfully complete 30 semester hours of courses on the Boulder Campus, including 12 semester hours in upper-division Physics courses.  A minimum of 128 semester hours is required.  Students must pass the following courses, or their equivalents:

                       APPM 1350 (135)                                Calculus for Engineers 1
                       APPM 1360 (136)                                Calculus for Engineers 2
                       APPM 2350 (235)                                Calculus for Engineers 3
                       (APPM 2360 (236) and                       Linear Algebra & Differential Equations
                            And U.D. Math electrive) or          U.D. Math elective
                       (MATH 3130 (313) and                       Intro. To Linear Algebra
                       MATH 4430 (443))                              Ordinary Differential Equations
                       CSCI 1200 (120) or                             Introduction to Programming I
                       CSCI 1300 (130) or                             Intro to Computing for Majors
                       CACI 1700 (115)                                 Intro to Scientific Programming
                       CHEM 1111 (103) and 1132 (106) or General Chemistry
                       CHEM 1151 (107) and 1171 (108)     Honors General Chemistry

                       22 hours of Engineering courses, including GEEN 1017 or MCEN 1025 and one upper-division laboratory course.        
                       Phys 1110 (111) and 1120 (112)          General Physics
                       Phys 1140 (114)                                   Experimental Physics
                       Phys 2130 (213)                                   General Physics
                       Phys 2140 (214)                                   Methods of Theoretical Physics
                       Phys 2150 (215)                                   Experimental Physics
                       Phys 3330 (317) and 3340 (318)          Junior Laboratory
                       Phys 3210 (321)                                   Analytical Mechanics
                       Phys 3220 (322)                                   Quantum Mechanics
                       Phys 3310 (331) and 3320 (332)          Prin. Electricity & Magnetism
                       Phys 4230 (341)                                   Thermodynamics & Stat Mech
                       Phys 4410 (491) and 4420 (492)          Atomic & Nuclear Physics
                       Phys 4430 (495)                                   Senior Laboratory

                        Plus one of the following courses:
                        Phys 4340 (446)                                 Solid-State Optics
                        Phys 4510 (451)                                 Optics
                        Phys 4530 (455)                                  Optics Lab
                        Phys 4610 (461) and 4620 (462)        Physics Honors
                        Phys 5010 (501)                                  Health Physics
                        Phys 5030 (503) and 5040 (504)        Intermediate Mathematical Physics
                        Phys 5150 (515)                                  Introductory Plasma Physics
                        Phys 5210 (621)                                  Theoretical Mechanics
                        Phys 5220                                           Nonlinear Dynamics
                        Phys 5250 (625)                                  Quantum Mechanics
                        Phys 5770 (585)                                  Gravitational Theory

                  A total of 18 semester hours of Social-Humanistic courses is required from the following three areas1.  At least six of those semester hours must be at or above the 3000-level.  As part of this requirement, either UWRP 3050-3 or GEEN 3100 and 3200 must be completed.

                  a.  Humanities:  Courses in Literature, Philosophy, Fine Arts2,  Music and all courses listed in the “Humanities” section of the Arts and Sciences College List, except those under Communication Disorders and Speech Science.

                  b.  Social Sciences:  Courses in Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology and all courses listed in the “Social Sciences” section of the Arts and Sciences College list, except those under Linguistics.  Courses on the History of Science listed under Philosophy in the Natural Science Section of the College List are also acceptable.

                  c.  Language and Communication:  Any reading or conversation courses in a language other than the student’s native tongue; any courses in expository writing, including those listed under the University Writing Program (UWRP).

1These requirements apply to students first entering CU in the Fall of 1989 and thereafter.  Students who attended CU while other Social-Humanistic Requirements for the Engineering  Physics Degree were in effect may elect to satisfy those requirements.

2Critical or Historical courses only.

              6.   B.S. in Engineering Physics, Applied Physics Option (College of Engineering and Applied Science) – Plan 5
                    No new applications for this program will be considered after September 1, 1986.  The requirements for this degree are the same as for the Engineering Physics degree (above), except as noted below:

                    Deletions:            PHYS 3340 (318), Junior Lab 
                                                4230 (341), Thermodynamics & Statistical Mechanics
                                                4410 (491), 4420 (492), Atomic and Nuclear Physics
                                                4430 (495),  Senior Laboratory
                                                 and the Physics elective (Phys 4340 (446) etc.)
                    Additions:           Any upper-division thermodynamics course
                                                4 hours of upper-division laboratory
                                                5 hours of Physics electives from list*
                                                24 hours of approved** applied natural science electives.

                  *Phys. 3340 (318),               Junior Laboratory
                    4230 (341),                         Thermodynamics & Stat. Mech.
                    361, 365, 366, 367, 440     These don’t exist
                    4340 (446)                          Solid-State Physics
                    4510 (451),                         Optics
                    4530 (455),                         Optics Lab
                    4610 (461), 4620 (462),     Physics Honors
                    4410 (491), 4420 (492),     Atomic & Nuclear Physics
                    4430 (495), 4440 (496)      Senior Laboratory
                   And 5000 level physics courses.

 

**The 24 hours of natural science electives must, in the opinion of the Engineering Physics
Advising Committee, form a sound curriculum for an applied physics degree in the students
area of interest.  Thirty hours of credit must be earned after obtaining committee approval. 
They must also include 4 hours of Upper Division labs and sufficient Engineering courses to
 meet the 22 hour requirement.

      B.    Graduate Curricula and Requirements

             The following are particular requirements of the Department of Physics.  Additional requirements are imposed by the Graduate School.

             1.   Advisors

                  The Graduate Committee will assign each incoming Graduate student both a faculty advisor and a Graduate student advisor who has been in residence for one or more years.

During the registration period the student’s faculty advisor must be consulted concerning the courses that should be taken.  A student may request a change of advisor through the Graduate Committee.

When thesis work is begun, the student’s thesis supervisor will be appointed as his/her advisor.

             2.   Qualifying Examination
                  
The Graduate Record Examination aptitude tests and advanced test in Physics are normally used as the qualifying examination for the Master’s and Ph.D. degrees.

             3.   Preliminary Examination (deleted December 29, 1987)

             4.   The Master’s Degree in Physics

                        There are two separate plans for obtaining the Master’s Degree.  Plan I includes a thesis (4 hours); Physics 621, 625, 631, 632; electives (5 hours) and mathematics (3 hours), both at the 500- or 600-level.  This is a total of 24 semester hours.  Plan II (without thesis) includes Physics 621, 625, 631, 632, and 626 or 656; a 600-level elective (3 hours); electives (6 hours) and mathematics (6 hours) both at the 500- or 600-level.  This is a total of 30 semester hours.

                        To obtain a Master’s degree in Physics, a student must:

                        a.   satisfy the Graduate School residence requirements for the Master’s Degree;

                        b.   file an Application for Admission to Candidacy at least ten weeks before the final oral examination is given, as required by the Graduate School;

                        c.   through preliminary evaluation by the Graduate Committee, satisfy the faculty that the student is qualified to study for the Ph.D. degree.

                        d.   meet the departmental course requirements for the Master’s Degree, each with a grade of C or better;

                        e.   pass a final oral examination given by a committee nominated by the departmental Graduate Committee and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School.  For Plan I, this oral exam will cover the thesis.  The thesis must be submitted in typewritten form for approval of the student’s thesis advisor at least 30 days before the final oral examination.  Once approved by the advisor, the thesis must be given to all members of the oral committee at least 15 days before the date of the oral exam.  The thesis defense must be scheduled in the department office at least two weeks in advance—and cannot be scheduled until a complete word processed version of the thesis is available for distribution.  If the general oral part of the Ph.D. Comprehensive Exam has been passed by a student in Plan II, that exam may substitute for the Master’s oral examination.

                        f.   complete all of the above requirements within 3 years of the student’s first registration in Graduate School.  (This requirement applies to those in the Master’s Degree program.  A student in the Ph.D. program who has passed the Ph.D. comprehensive examination and who has fulfilled all of the requirements for the Master’s Degree may petition to obtain an M.S. degree within the time limit set by the Graduate School, which is, at present, five years.)

 

                  There is no foreign language requirement for the Master’s Degree.

                
              5.   The Ph.D. Degree in Physics

                   a.   To obtain a Ph.D. in Physics a Graduate student must:

                         (1)    through preliminary evaluation by the Graduate Committee, satisfy the faculty that the student is qualified to study for the Ph.D. Degree.

                         (2)   satisfy the Graduate School residence and course requirements for the Ph.D. degree;

                         (3)    meet the department hours requirement for the Ph.D.  (see Section d);

                         (4)    file a Ph.D. candidacy application at least two weeks before the Comprehensive Examination, as required by the Graduate School;

                         (5)    pass the Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination (Section b) given by the Department;

                         (6)    submit an acceptable thesis reporting original research performed by                                      the candidate;

                         (7)    pass a final oral examination (thesis defense) given by a committee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School.  The Department will recommend that the advisor and titular advisor (if any) be members of the committee and that the committee include at least three members of the Physics Faculty.

                   b.   Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination in Physics

                         The Comprehensive Examination is in three parts:  a general written part, a general oral part and a research part.  The general parts of the Comprehensive Examination will usually be taken for the first time at the beginning of the Spring semester and the second year of Graduate work in Physics.  The examination will be such that the average Graduate student in the department should be able to pass it on his/her first attempt.  It may be taken only by those whose preliminary evaluation by the Graduate Committee has been satisfactory.  If a student has had at least one year of Graduate work in Physics elsewhere, s/he will be expected to take the general part of the comprehensive examination in the Spring semester directly following the semester in which s/he was first enrolled as a Graduate student in this Department of Physics.  A student who has had few Graduate courses because s/he had to make up undergraduate deficiencies may petition to be allowed to take the Comprehensive Examination one year later than usual.  The Comprehensive Examination may be taken a second time no later than the next time it is regularly given.

              A student failing the examination for a second time may not continue as a candidate for a Ph.D.  With the approval of the Graduate Committee, selected first-year Graduate students may be allowed to take the general parts of the Comprehensive Examination without penalty in case they should fail.

               For Physics students, the written part will cover material from four major disciplines:  Electrodynamics (level of Physics 631-632), Quantum Mechanics (625-626), Classical Mechanics (621) and Statistical Mechanics (644).  There will also be “Quickies”—short-answer questions—to test general Physics knowledge.  Typically, there will be six questions in each examination and the student will be asked to answer no more than four of these (with no credit being given for attempts beyond this number).  A typical written part of the exam would have the following format:

                   Exam 1 – Electrodynamics
                   Exam 2 - Quantum Mechanics
                   Exam 3 – Classical Mechanics and “Quickies”
                   Exam 4 – Statistical Mechanics and “Quickies”

            The oral part of the Comprehensive Examination will be given shortly after the written part of the exam is completed.  All of the orals will be given on one or two days by three-person oral committees.  Each student will spend about one hour with each of two different committees.  Each oral question and answer will normally not exceed 10 minutes so that there will be at east five questions per session.

              The Department Faculty will meet following the orals to decide by majority vote who has passed the general parts of the Comprehensive Examination.  In addition to the total score, the student will be scored separately on each of the four major disciplines on the written part.  The total score on the general written examination is used to determine whether a student passes that examination.  A student might pass that examination but fail one or more of the four sections.  In such a case, if the student has not completed a course (or courses) in the failed discipline(s), s/he is required to take and pass the appropriate course(s) prior to admission to candidacy.

              In addition to the general parts of the Comprehensive Examination, there will be a third (research) part.  This will take the form of an oral presentation to the thesis committee (Section c.) of a proposed thesis topic or area.  Students will be required to make this presentation during the September following their passing of the general part of the Comprehensive Examination.

                    c.   Thesis Committee

                         In addition to the research advisor, the student must have a thesis committee of several faculty members—at least two of whom are members of the department and of the Graduate School Faculty.  This committee is to be chosen after the student passes the two general parts of the Comprehensive Examination and before the following September.  The committee is chosen by the student’s research advisor with the approval of the Chairman of the Department of Physics.

                         If the research advisor is not in the Department of Physics, a “titular” advisor in the Department must be chosen by the Department Chairman to serve as chairman of the committee and to oversee the thesis on the Department’s behalf.  Committee meetings are to be held at least once each academic year to assess thesis and research progress.  Students in joint programs can have their advisor in one of the departments involved—e.g., a Chemical Physics student can have his/her advisor from either the Department of Physics or from the Department of Chemistry.

                    d.   Courses

                         There is not a set of specific course requirements for the Ph.D. (except for Medical Physics).

                         Students entering the Ph.D. program after July 1, 1980, will be required to present a minimum of 66 semester hours of course work and dissertation credit combined.  Of that minimum, students must complete at least 36 hours of course work at or above the 500-level with a grade of B- or better and at least 30 hours of dissertation credit.  Of the 36 hours of course work, at least 27 must be Physics courses.  Courses presented as part of the required 36 hours that do not have a Physics Department course designation must be approved by the Graduate Committee.

                         (Students enrolled prior to July 1, 1980, will be required to complete a minimum of 36 hours of course work at the 500-level and above and 30 hours of dissertation credit.)

                          Although the material is not covered on the Comprehensive Examination, Graduate students are normally expected to take Physics 627 and one or more courses of the Mathematical Physics sequence (e.g., Physics 503 and 504 or Physics 603 and 604).

                          Course grades in all Graduate courses will be A through F and will have the following meanings:

                         A  =                                              outstanding          B-  =  below-average
                         A- =  well-above-average              C   =  failure to pass at the Ph.D. level
                         B   =  low average                  D & F    =  failure to pass at the Master’s level
                         B+ =   high average                                      and at the Ph.D. level                                    
                          These grades are to be kept on the records of the Department of Physics and will be used in evaluating a student’s performance.

                         Course offerings:

                          (1)   The core courses 621, 631, 632, 625, 626 and 644 will be offered       once every year.

                          (2)   The courses—603, 604, 627, 687, 690, 692—will be offered once every         year, provided there is sufficient demand.

                          (3)    All other Graduate Physics courses will be offered at most once every           two years and then only if there is sufficient demand.

                    e.              Ph.D. Thesis and Final Oral Exam

                                    The thesis must be submitted in typewritten form for approval of the student’s advisor at least 30 days before the final oral examination.  Once approved by the advisor, the thesis must be given to all members of the oral committee at least 15 days before the oral exam.  The thesis defense must be scheduled in the department office at least two weeks in advance—and cannot be scheduled until a complete word processed version of the thesis is available for distribution.

                        Whenever possible, the Ph.D. thesis defense will be scheduled as an open seminar, followed by a closed session with the oral examination committee.

                    f.    Time Limits

                         Graduate students who are unable to complete their thesis requirements within four years after passing their comprehensives are required—by the rules of the Graduate School—to retake a comprehensive examination.  If the Graduate School does not approve a time extension for completing the thesis, the Graduate Committee will appoint an examination committee that will administer an extensive oral comprehensive exam.  This committee shall not have as members any faculty from the thesis committee.  If a student should fail to pass this exam, the question of his/her status in this department will be referred to the faculty for a decision.

                   g.   Teaching Assistantships, Research Assistantships, Fellowships

                         Holders of TA’s, RA’s and fellowships must be full-time students.  For these purposes a student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester if the student is registered for not fewer than 5 semester hours in work numbered 500 or above, or for at least 8 semester hours of other Graduate work, or for the minimum number of thesis hours specified by the Graduate School.

                         The Department of Physics expects all students except those in special circumstances to teach for at least two semesters.

                         Teaching Assistantships are normally given to Graduate students only during their first two years.

                          h.   Ph.D. Degree in Physics with Specialization in Medical Physics

                               All of the departmental requirements apply, except for the course requirements.   In addition, the thesis research must be in an area of Medical Physics and members of the faculty of the Department of Radiology must be included on the thesis committee.

                               In place of the general departmental requirement of 27 semester hours of courses in Physics, the following specific courses are required for a Ph.D. in Physics with a specialization in Medical Physics, totaling 24 semester hours in Physics and 18 in Radiology:

                                       Theoretical Mechanics (Physics 5210-3)
                                       Electricity and Magnetism (Physics 7310-3, 7320-3)
                                       Quantum Mechanics (Physics 5250-3, 5260-3)
                                       Statistical Mechanics (Physics 7230-3)
                                       Mathematical Physics (6 hours at the 5000 or higher level)

                                       The following courses taught by the Department of Radiology at the School of Medicine, Health Sciences Center (Denver) totaling 27 quarter hours (equivalent to 18 semester hours) are also required:

                                       Clinical Experience (Radiology 600-2, 601-2 and 602-2)
                                       Clinical Radiology (Radiology 608-1, 609-1 and 610-1)
                                       Basic Radiological Physics (Radiology 613-2, 614-2 and 615-2)
                                       Physics of Radiation Therapy (Radiology 621-2 and 622-2)
                                       Physics of Medical Imaging (Radiology 616-2, 617-2 and 618-2)
                                       Radiopharmacy, Anatomy and Physiology (Radiology 623-2)

                          Note that the Graduate School requires a total of 66 semester hours of course work and dissertation credit combined.

                   6.   Deviations

                         Permission to deviate from any of the Department of Physics Graduate regulations may be requested from the Graduate Committee, whose decisions are subject to review by the Graduate faculty.  Such decisions may be changed by a simple majority vote of the Graduate faculty.
            

      B.    Departmental Committees
                 
              1.   Departmental Committees, General
              2.   Standing Committees
                   a.  Chairman’s Advisory
                   b.  Evaluation Panel (changed 4-10-90)
                   c.  Arts and Sciences Advising
                   d.  Engineering Physics Advising
                   e.  Graduate
                   f.  Comprehensive Examination
                   g.  Colloquium
                   h.  Computing
                   i.   Library
                   j.   Chemical Physics
                   k.  Mathematical Physics
                   l.   Geophysics
                   m. Medical Physics
                   n.  Course
                   o.  Schedule
                    p.  Teaching Evaluation
                   q.  Honors
                   r.   International and Cooperative Education
                   s.  Public Relations
                   t.   Chairmanship Election

      1.     Departmental Committees, General
              a.   Standing Committees may be established or abolished by a majority vote.
              b.  Ad hoc Committees may be established by a majority vote or by the Chairman.  Unless another expiration date is specified, all ad hoc committees expire automatically each June 30.
              c.   Members of committees (both faculty and student members) and the chair of each committee will be appointed by the Departmental Chairman to terms that expire each June 30.
              d.  Typical sizes of committees are given in parentheses below.

      2.     Standing Committees
              a.   Chairman’s Advisory Committee (CAC) (Seven)
                   The Departmental Chairman and the Associate Chairman both serve on the CAC, which is chaired by the Department Chairman.  The CAC reviews personnel and policy proposals and makes recommendations to the Chairman and/or to the Faculty.  The topics reviewed include:  appointment, promotion, tenure, procedures used to set salaries, Graduate faculty matters, long-range planning, priorities in the assignment of building space, staff personnel policies and other matters of importance to the Department.

             b.   Evaluation Panel (Five)
                         Each year the Chair picks five members of the regular faculty to serve on the Department of Physics Evaluation Panel.  At no time may the Panel contain fewer than three tenured faculty, one of whom will be selected by the Department Chair to chair the Panel.  The Evaluation Panel serves two essential functions:  (1) It carries out the first-level review in all cases involving reappointment, promotion or tenure, and submits its recommendations in such cases to the Chairman’s Advisory Committee, which in turn makes a recommendation for specific action to the appropriate subset of the Voting Faculty.  (2) In addition, the Evaluation Panel is responsible for carrying out annual performance evaluations of the Regular Faculty and Attendant Rank members of the Special Faculty and for transmitting the results of its deliberations to the Department Chair.  (Changed 4-10-90.)

              c.  Arts and Sciences Advising Committee (Seven)
                   The Committee advises students, maintains records of students’ academic progress; certifies that students have met the Physics requirements for graduation; evaluates transfer credits for courses taken at other institutions; receives, evaluates and approves or rejects student petitions requesting minor exceptions to departmental requirements; has the responsibility for the currency of the text in the College of Arts and Sciences; recommends students for scholarships and awards; makes recommendations to the Voting Faculty with regard to changes in the Physics curricula.

              d.  Engineering Physics Advising Committee (Seven)
                   The Committee advises students, maintains records of students’ academic progress, certifies that students have met the Physics requirements for graduation; evaluates transfer credits for courses taken at other institutions; receives, evaluates or rejects student petitions requesting minor exceptions to departmental requirements; has the responsibility for the currency of the text in the university catalog describing the Engineering Physics degree programs; recommends students for scholarships and awards; and makes recommendations to the voting faculty with regard to changes in the Engineering Physics curricula.

              e.  Graduate Committee (Graduate Faculty—seven from Boulder, one from Denver, one from Colorado Springs and four Graduate students)
                   The Committee reviews and approves or rejects applications for admission to the Graduate Program in Physics; awards teaching assistantships; assigns students to faculty and Graduate student advisors; maintains records of students’ academic progress; certifies that students have met the Physics requirements for graduation; evaluates transfer credits for courses taken at other institutions; receives, evaluates and approves or rejects student petitions requesting minor exceptions to departmental requirements; recommends students for scholarships and awards; has the responsibility for the currency of the text in the university catalog describing the Graduate degree programs in Physics; reports regularly to the Graduate Physics faculty with regard to petitions for significant deviations from departmental rules or procedures; makes recommendations for changes in the Graduate Physics curricula.

             (Preliminary examination eliminated in minutes of April 14, 1987.)

             f.    Comprehensive Examination (Eight Faculty, Two Students)
                         The Committee prepares, schedules, administers and supervises the grading of the Comprehensive Examinination.  It recommends to the Voting Faculty passing levels for the examination.

             g.   Colloquium Committee (Three)
                   The Committee arranges regular and special colloquia.

             h.   Computing (Five)
                         The Committee assists faculty in obtaining technical and financial support for computing.

             i.    Library (Three)
                         The Committee is concerned with the Oliver C. Lester Library of Mathematics and Physics.  The Committee works with the staff of the Library, recommending books and periodicals to be acquired and recommending improvements in the Library.

             j.    Chemical Physics (Four from Physics, Four from Chemistry)
                   The Committee oversees the Graduate program in Chemical Physics.

             k.   Mathematical Physics (Six from Physics, Six from Mathematics)
                   The Committee oversees the Graduate program in Mathematical Physics.)

             l.    Geophysics (Three)
                   The Committee oversees the Graduate program in Geophysics.

             m.  Medical Physics (Three)
                   The Committee oversees the Graduate program in Medical Physics.

             n.   Course (Five)
                   The Committee reviews the adequacy and currency of Physics course offerings, reviews proposals for new courses, reviews the syllabi of Physics courses and chooses the texts for use in the elementary Physics course.

      C.    Departmental Committees (continued)

             o.   Schedule Committee (Three)
                   The Committee prepares the departmental text for the University’s Schedule of Courses, assigns recitations and teaching laboratory duties to faculty members (regular and volunteer) and assigns duties to teaching assistants and graders.  All assignments are subject to review by the Chairman.

             p.   Teaching Evaluation (Four)
                   The Committee supervises the preparation and administration of the departmental teaching evaluations that are filled out by students each semester; evaluates (through classroom visits) the teaching of untenured faculty, conducts exit interviews with graduating students concerning teaching, reviews all evaluations of the teaching of each member of the faculty, and prepares a summary of the comments on the department’s recitation and laboratory teaching evaluation forms for review by the Evaluation Panels and for inclusion in the department’s teaching evaluation records.

             q.   Honors (Two)
                   The Committee maintains the Departmental Honors Program.

             r.    International and Cooperative Education (Two)
                   The Committee works to advance the opportunities for International study, exchange and scientific collaboration for faculty and students; serves as a liaison between the department and the University’s Cooperative Education Program.

              s.   The Committee seeks to improve public understanding of the work of the department through media releases, etc., nominates faculty for various awards both within the University and within the Physics community, and maintains regular communication with alumni of the Department.

              t.   Chairmanship Election Committee (Three)
                   1)   The Committee will be named approximately 10 months in advance of the expiration of the term of office of the Chairman or will be named a soon as possible after receipt of notification that the chairmanship will become vacant in advance of the expiration of the term of office.
                    2)  The Committee will conduct the election of a new chairman according to the following procedures:
                         a)   Each member of the voting faculty will be asked to nominate two candidates from the regular faculty.
                         b)  Nomination of candidates from outside the department shall be by a petition carrying ten or more signatures of the regular faculty. 
                         c)   The Committee will announce an alphabetical slate consisting of the five candidates with the largest number of nominations who are willing to serve.
.                         d)  After the slate is announced, other members of the regular faculty may be added to the slate—provided they are willing to serve if elected—by nomination by petitions signed by ten or more members of the voting faculty.
                         e)   Candidates will be listed alphabetically on all ballots.
                         f)   Each member of the voting faculty will be asked to cast a written ballot vote for one candidate.  (See Rule 12.)
                         g)   To be elected, a candidate must receive two-thirds of the eligible votes (Rules 12, 4, g and j).
                         h)   If no one is elected, voting will be conducted in accord with f) and g) (above) in the following steps in sequence until someone is elected:
                                i)     a ballot will list the top three candidates in the outcome of the voting of f);
                               ii)    a ballot will list the top two candidates in the outcome of the voting of  i);
                              iii)    a ballot will list only the top candidate in the outcome of the voting of ii) and each member of the voting faculty will be asked to vote “yes” or “no”for that candidate;
                               iv)   a ballot will list only the second candidate in the outcome of the voting of ii) and each member of the voting faculty will be asked to vote “yes” or “no” for that candidate.
                         i)   If no candidate is elected, the process will be repeated starting with step                                  2), a).
                         j)   If possible, the elections should be conducted on a schedule that will allow the new chairman to work approximately one semester with the outgoing chairman.
                   3)   The Associate Chairman is appointed by the Chairman.  Ordinarily the Associate Chairman administers the department if the Chairman is temporarily absent.  For a longer absence, the Chairman may appoint an Acting Chairman.  For an extended absence, the Chairman may call for the election of a replacement according to the procedures above.  The person so elected should have the title “Chairman” and not “Acting Chairman” or “Chairman pro tem”.

      D.   General

              1.  DISTRIBUTION OF THE “RULES, POLICIES AND PROCEDURES”
                         The Rules, Policies and Procedures shall be reviewed and updated annually.  Updated copies shall be available at the start of each academic year and a copy shall be included with the minutes of each academic year.

              2.   MINUTES OF DEPARTMENT MEETINGS
                   The minutes of each meeting of the faculty should be kept, numbered sequentially and circulated to all who were eligible to attend the meeting.  If the faculty votes not to keep minutes of a particular meeting, a record of this action shall be entered in the minutes of the next meeting for which minutes are kept.

              3.   APPOINTMENT OF SPECIAL FACULTY
                   a.    Excepting Emeritus Professors, all Special Faculty are expected to be continuously and actively involved in the department’s programs of teaching and research and may serve on departmental committees.
                         b.        Excepting Emeritus Professors and faculty on joint appointment,     appointment to the Special Faculty will be for a term not exceeding three years.

              4.  FACULTY ANNUAL REVIEW
                   After the Evaluation Panels A and B have completed their evaluations of the performance of all members of the Faculty and have given their evauations to the Chairman, the Chairman will meet individually with each Faculty member to discuss the Faculty Member’s performance, the evaluations of the Panels, and the Faculty Member’s goals and plans (including distribution of time) for the coming year.

                           5.  POST-TENURE REVIEW
                                Recognizing that the intent of the post-tenure review is facilitation of continued  faculty development, the Department of Physics adopts the following guidelines:
                                a.    Post-tenure review will be incorporated into the annual salary evaluation procedure.
                                b.    In order to have the review every 5-7 years, five tenured faculty will be reviewed each year, beginning with the most senior department members.
                                c.    These faculty will be part of the group that are reviewed by both evaluation committees.
                                d.   A statement of future plans will be requested from each faculty member under review.
                                e.    Written comments will be forwarded to the Dean.
                                f.    The Chairman of the Department will work with the faculty member and with the University Administration to find the resources needed for implementation of individual plans.

                           6.  PREREQUISITE REQUIREMENTS
                   In order to enroll in a Physics course at the upper division or higher, a student must have a grade of C-minus or better in the prerequisite courses or have the permission of the instructor.

             7.   TEACHING RECITATION SECTIONS
                   Approximately one-half of the total number of recitation and laboratory sections in Physics 111, 112, 114, 212, 213 and 215 shall be taught by members of the  regular and Special Faculty.

             8.   USE OF “ATTENDANT RANK” PROFESSOR, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND ASSISTANT PROFESSOR TITLES
                         Appointments to the Special Faculty positions of Professor Attendant Rank, Associate Professor Attendant Rank and Assistant Professor Attendant Rank are for individuals whose qualifications are comparable to those of the corresponding regular faculty titles of Professor, Associate Professor and Assistant Professor, respectively, but who are supported by grant or contract or other non-general University funds.

                   Appointments to Assistant Professor Attendant Rank are intended to be of limited total duration.  Appointments to Associate Professor or Professor, Attendant Rank, can be of limited total duration or can carry with them the implication of “contract tenure.”  In the latter case it means the Department of Physics agrees that the appointment is intended to continue as long as sufficient funds are provided by the external grants/contracts supporting the individual at the time of appointment to one of these higher Attendant Rank positions.