Classical Mechanics/ Math Methods 1

About these materials

At CU Boulder, we are working on a long term project to help transform the first semester of our Classical Mechanics/Math Methods I course (generally taken by sophomores) to make better use of ideas and materials from the PER community.

Classical Mechanics/Math Methods I is the first course in a two-semester classical mechanics sequence. Content coverage is similar to the first half of most one-semester classical mechanics courses; this course concludes just before introducing the calculus of variations.

On this site, you will find a number of materials we have borrowed or developed. Feel free to use what you like - we would like to share materials, but also believe in giving credit to sources whenever possible.



How to obtain materials

Materials on this site are organized using the menu above. You can navigate this site as you would a typical webpage to view or download course materials.

You can view all materials by navigating to the "Source Documents" folder.

If you prefer, you can download the entire course archive in a zip format.



Review our Classical Mechanics Assessment?

As part of our research efforts into student learning in this course, we have developed an assessment of our Course Learning Goals. We are solicting feedback on this instrument.

If you are interested in reviewing the instrument and providing feedback, please do so using this survey. Alternatively, you can request a PDF copy of the intrument by contacting or through the secure download.



Are you using these materials?

Please contact us if you plan to use all or part of these course materials for your own classical mechanics course. If you have already used these materials, please fill out a short survey (~ 5 min.) about your experience. Your valuable feedback will help us understand where and how these materials are being used, and ways they might be improved.



Creative Commons License
Materials that were developed at CU Boulder are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Works borrowed or adapted from others are subject to their respective licenses.

This material is based upon work supported by the University of Colorado and the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers DUE 1023028 and DUE 0737118.
Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.