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undergraduate courses

The University Catalog contains a complete list of courses taught in the Philosophy Department. Undergraduate courses are those numbered in the 1000s, 2000s, 3000s, and 4000s. Upper division courses (3000s and 4000s) are listed below. All upper division courses have prerequisites; please check the catalog.

Spring 2015

PHIL 3000: History of Ancient Philosophy
SEC 001, TR 2:00-3:15, HLMS 137
Prof. Bailey

PHIL 3010: History of Modern Philosophy
SEC 001, MWF 12:00-12:50, HLMS 229
Prof. Hanna
What is the nature of the State, what is political authority, and how do these relate to religion? Does God exist, and can we prove it? What is the nature of reality, and how does it relate to God? What is the relation of the mind to the body, and to reality more generally? And what is knowledge--especially logical, mathematical, or natural scientific knowledge--and how does it relate to faith? In this course, which is essentially a more advanced version of PHIL 1020, we'll address all of these fundamental political, theological, metaphysical, and epistemological questions by reading and critically discussing parts of some classic texts of modern (i.e., 17th & 18th century, 1600-1800) philosophy, by Hobbes, Descartes, Pascal, Spinoza, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, and Hume.

SEC 002, TR 9:30-10:45, CLRE 209
Prof. Kaufman

PHIL 3100: Ethical Theory
SEC 001, TR 9:30-10:45, HLMS 237
Prof. Heathwood

PHIL 3110: Feminist Practical Ethics
SEC 001, MWF 12:00-12:50, CLUB 13
Dr. Warren

PHIL 3140: Environmental Ethics
SEC 001, TR 11:00-12:15, BESC 185
Dr. Youkey
SEC 002, MWF 10:00-10:50, RAMY N1B31
Dr. Sturgis
SEC 003, TR 2:00-3:15, RAMY N1B31
Dr. Youkey

PHIL 3160: Bioethics
SEC 001, TR 9:30-10:45, KOBL 230
Dr. Colvin
SEC 002, TR 11:00-12:15, RAMY N1B31
Dr. Colvin
There are no prerequisites for this course other than an open and critical mind. We will begin with an overview studying three main approaches in contemporary ethics and apply them to current controversies in bioethics.

The point of this course is not to establish the "truth" about any of these controversies but rather to develop critical thinking and writing skills. We will learn how to think philosophically, that is, how to recognize and construct arguments rather than mere opinions. The course covers traditional topics in bioethics such as abortion, euthanasia, and the doctor/patient relationship, but also examines the ethical aspects of emerging technologies (such as gene therapy), and the way the science of medicine is reshaping its social role.

PHIL 3200: Social and Political Philosophy
SEC 001, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 229
Dr. Sturgis
SEC 880, TR 2:00-3:15, HLMS 196
Prof. Wingo

PHIL 3260: Philosophy and the International Order
SEC 001, TR 9:30-10:45, CLRE 302
Dr. Chamorro
SEC 002, TR 11:00-12:15, HLMS 237
Dr. Chamorro

PHIL 3410: History of Science: Ancients to Newton
SEC 880, TR 9:30-10:45, HLMS 177
Dr. Brindell

PHIL 3480: Critical Thinking and Writing in Philosophy
SEC 001, TR 12:30-1:45, HLMS 177
Dr. Potter
SEC 002, TR 11:00-12:15, HLMS 177
Dr. Potter

PHIL 3600: Philosophy of Religion
SEC 001, TR 3:30-4:45, HLMS 237
Prof. Fileva

PHIL 3700: Aesthetic Theory
SEC 001, TR 2:00-3:15, HLMS 177
Prof. Oddie
The primary focus of this course is to explore the philosophy of art. Creating, enjoying and appreciating art is one of the most distinctive features of human beings. Artworks are among the most valued entities in our culture, but also in most human cultures. But what is art, and why do we, or why should we, value it so highly? These are the core questions that we will address in this course. We will explore a variety of answers that philosophers have given to these basic questions. Perhaps unsurprisingly, it turns out to be difficult to formulate a coherent and consistent theory of art and of its value. One aim of the course is to become familiar with the main answers to these questions, and the arguments for and against them. The range of theories we will explore include: the representational theory, the expression theory, formalism, neo-Wittgensteinianism, and the institutional theory. But aesthetic theory encompasses more than the domain of art. A secondary aim of the course will be to locate art within the wider domain of aesthetic objects, aesthetic properties, and aesthetic experiences. We will examine a general account of aesthetic value, one that resurfaces from time to time, and was most explicitly expounded by Francis Hutcheson in An Inquiry into the Original of Our Ideas of Beauty and Virtue (1725). The concept of beauty, which was once thought to be central to the understanding of art, was pretty much sent into exile in twentieth century philosophy of art, but recently some philosophers of art have begun to pay attention to it again. Hutcheson's thesis is that beauty is unified complexity. We will explore how far this idea can give us a general theory of art and its value, and how that might fit in to a general theory of value.

PHIL 4010: Single Philosopher: Aquinas
SEC 001, MWF 12:00-12:50, HLMS 177
Prof. Pasnau

PHIL 4010: Single Philosopher: Leibniz
SEC 002, TR 12:30-1:45, CLRE 302
Prof. Kaufman

PHIL 4120: Philosophy and Animals
SEC 001, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 245
Prof. Norcross

PHIL 4250: Marxism
SEC 001, TR 12:30-1:45, HLMS 181
Dr. Bredeson
If we consider the sheer breadth of his influence across diverse academic disciplines--in philosophy, political theory, economics, historiography, and literary theory--there is a strong case to be made that Marx was the most influential thinker to emerge from modern Europe. Granted, Marx himself, were he alive today, might regard his achievement with a measure of embarrassment. As he famously put it, the point is not to interpret the world, but to change it. Despite the countless revolutions, large and small, that have been launched in his name, the jury is very much still out on the power of Marxist critique to bring about the kind of material change that Marx he sought. To try to come to grips with Marx's legacy, we will examine Marx's critique of capitalism both in its historical context and in the context of today's world. We will being with the philosophical background to Marx's thought; readings will be drawn from Kant, Novalis, Hegel, and Feuerbach. We will then turn to Marx's early philosophical, economic, and political writings. The most intensive part of the course will involve a close reading of (most of) Marx's monumental critique of capitalism, the first volume of Capital. Finally, we will turn to several important appropriations of (and challenges to) Marx's thought in the twentieth century and beyond; readings will be drawn from Angela Davis, G.A. Cohen, Jon Elster, and Thomas Piketty.

PHIL 4340: Epistemology
SEC 001, TR 3:30-4:45, HLMS 177
Prof. Huemer

PHIL 4360: Metaphysics
SEC 001, MWF 2:00-2:50, HLMS 177
Prof. Cleland
SEC 002, TR 2:00-3:15, HLMS 181
Instructor TBA

PHIL 4490: Philosophy of Language
SEC 001, TR 11:00-12:15, ATLS 1B25
Prof. Forbes
The course will focus on the difference between semantic and pragmatic aspects of meaning in language.

The central concept of semantics is that of compositionality, which goes back to Frege: the meaning of a complex phrase is derived in a systematic way from the meanings of its syntactic constituents. In the first part of the course we will work through an elementary version of a compositional semantic theory, based on type theory. The text for this is a short introduction to semantics, Formal Models of Fregean Compositionality, by the instructor, and will be available in the campus bookstore in January.

The central concept of pragmatics is that of conversational implicature, due to Grice. Grice's original paper, Logic and Conversation, will be distributed during the semester, as will several other readings.

The course grade will be based on homework problems set in the first part of the course, and a paper set at the end of the second.

Fall 2014

PHIL 3000: History of Ancient Philosophy
SEC 001, TR 11:00-12:15, FLMG 103
Prof. Bailey
SEC 002, TR 2:00-3:15, HLMS 196
Prof. Bailey

PHIL 3010: History of Modern Philosophy
SEC 002, TR 11:00-12:15, HLMS 267
Prof. Kaufman
SEC 003, MWF 1:00-1:50, CLUB 4
Dr. Potter

PHIL 3100: Ethical Theory
SEC 001, TR 12:30-1:45, HLMS 241
Prof. Norcross

PHIL 3140: Environmental Ethics
SEC 002, MWF 9:00-9:50, HUMN 250
Dr. Youkey
SEC 003, MWF 11:00-11:50, HALE 240
Dr. Sturgis
SEC 004, MWF 12:00-12:50, MUEN E064
Dr. Youkey

PHIL 3160: Bioethics
SEC 001, MWF 12:00-12:50, CLUB 4
Dr. Purves
SEC 002, MWF 2:00-2:50, HLMS 141
Dr. Purves

PHIL 3190: War and Morality
SEC 002, MWF 1:00-1:50, CLUB 13
Dr. Youkey

PHIL 3200: Social and Political Philosophy
SEC 002, MWF 11:00-11:50, CLUB 4
Prof. Wingo

PHIL 3260: Philosophy and the International Order
SEC 001, MWF 10:00-10:50, CLUB 13
Dr. Chamorro
SEC 002, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 211
Dr. Chamorro

PHIL 3310: Cognitive Science
SEC 001, MWF 2:00-2:50, ECCR 105
Prof. Eisenberg

PHIL 3480: Critical Writing and Thinking in Philosophy
SEC 001, TR 3:30-4:45, HLMS 177
Prof. Chwang
SEC 003, TR 12:30-1:45, HLMS 177
Prof. Monton

PHIL 3600: Philosophy of Religion
SEC 001, MWF 2:00-2:50, HUMN 125
Prof. Heathwood

PHIL 3800: Open Topics in Philosophy: Buddhism as Philosophy
SEC 001, TR 11:00-12:15, MCOL E155
Prof. Zimmerman

PHIL 3800: Open Topics in Philosophy: Existentialism
SEC 002, MWF 4:00-4:50, HUMN 1B70
Prof. Fileva

PHIL 4010: Single Philosopher: Kant
SEC 001, MWF 12:00-12:50, VAC 1B90
Prof. Hanna

PHIL 4200: Contemporary Political Philosophy
SEC 002, TR 3:30-4:45, MCOL E186
Prof. Jaggar
Topic: Political authority and the international state system
Until the latter part of the twentieth century, the central questions of Western political philosophy concerned internal legitimacy of the state and the limits of its authority. However, the emergence of an international human rights order since World War II has raised new challenges for traditional conceptions of state sovereignty. This course will study some of these challenges with a view to rethinking the future of the state. Topics include:

  • State regulation and personal liberty
  • Democracy and economic inequality
  • Nationalism
  • Responsibility for global poverty
  • International aid
  • Humanitarian military intervention
  • Migration
  • Self-determination and secession

PHIL 4340: Epistemology
SEC 002, MWF 11:00-11:50, HLMS 177
Prof. Huemer

PHIL 4360: Metaphysics
SEC 002, TR 3:30-4:45, HLMS 237
Prof. Tooley

PHIL 4400: Philosophy of Science
SEC 002, TR 2:00-3:15, MCOL E186
Prof. Cleland

PHIL 4450: History and Philosophy of Physics
SEC 001, TR 11:00-12:15, DUAN G2B47
Prof. Franklin


Spring 2014

PHIL 3000: History of Ancient Philosophy
SEC 001, MWF 11:00-11:50, HLMS 229
Prof. Lee

PHIL 3010: History of Modern Philosophy
SEC 001, TR 9:30-10:45, HUMN 125
Dr. Potter

PHIL 3100: Ethical Theory
SEC 001, MWF 12:00-12:50, CLUB 13
Prof. Mills

PHIL 3140: Environmental Ethics
SEC 001, TR 2:00-3:15, BESC 185
Dr. Youkey
SEC 002, MWF 10:00-10:50, MUEN E064
Dr. Warren
SEC 003, MWF 8:00-8:50, MUEN E064
Dr. Vance

PHIL 3160: Bioethics
SEC 001, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 229
Dr. Warren
SEC 002, MWF 3:00-3:50, MCOL E155
Dr. Purves

PHIL 3180: Critical Thinking: Contemporary Topics
SEC 001, MWF 9:00-9:50, HLMS 267

PHIL 3190: War and Morality
SEC 001, MWF 12:00-12:50, BESC 185
Dr. Waidler

PHIL 3200: Social and Political Philosophy
SEC 001, MWF 11:00-11:50, HLMS 237
Dr. Colvin

PHIL 3260: Philosophy and the International Order
SEC 001, TR 9:30-10:45, ECON 205
SEC 002, TR 12:30-1:45, CLRE 209
Dr. Chamorro

PHIL 3430: History of Science: Newton to Einstein
SEC 001, TR 9:30-10:45, HALE 260
SEC 880, TR 12:30-1:45, LIBR M498
Dr. Youkey

PHIL 3480: Critical Thinking and Writing in Philosophy
SEC 001, MWF 12:00-12:50, HLMS 177
Prof. Monton
SEC 003, TR 11:00-12:15, HLMS 177
Dr. Potter

PHIL 3600: Philosophy of Religion
SEC 001, MWF 10:00-10:50, HLMS 211
Prof. Heathwood

PHIL 4010: Single Philosopher: Nietzsche
SEC 001, TR 11:00-12:15, HLMS 251
Prof. Zimmerman
In this course, we will investigate a number of important themes from Nietzsche's writings, including: perspectivalism, nominalism, the idea that art is worth more than truth, the death of God, nihilism, the revaluation of morality, and the origins of morality. We begin with a few of Nietzsche's early essays (such as "On Truth and Lying in an Extra-Moral Sense"), which introduce themes that Nietzsche would continue to explore until the end of his working life. After reading portions of The Birth of Tragedy, as well as two essays from Untimely Meditations, we will read portions of Beyond Good and Evil. We conclude with The Genealogy of Morals. Secondary literature pertinent to these readings will be assigned. Graduate students will write a term paper exploring an area of Nietzsche's thought that we have explored in class.

PHIL 4010: Single Philosopher: Plato
SEC 002, MWF 2:00-2:50, VAC 1B90
Prof. Lee
This course will be an advanced survey of Plato's views on metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and political philosophy. We will be carefully reading dialogues such as the Meno, Phaedo, Republic, Parmenides, Theaetetus, Timaeus, plus important pieces of secondary literature on Plato. The course presupposes prior acquaintance with Plato.

PHIL 4040: Studies in 20th Century Philosophy
SEC 001, MWF 12:00-12:50, MCOL E186
Prof. Oddie
This course will concentrate on the work of four central thinkers, all of whom were writing at the beginning of the twentieth century - Frege, Russell, Meinong and Husserl - and whose work shaped much of the landscape for twentieth century philosophy. The work of Frege and Russell profoundly shaped the analytic tradition for the remainder of the twentieth century. And although Meinong and Husserl worked on a very similar range of problems, and can both be happily located in the analytic tradition, their work shaped what is often thought of as a quite different - perhaps even opposing - tradition: that of phenomenology, existentialism and so-called continental philosophy more generally. We will be examining and evaluating their different proposed solutions to some basic problems in ontology - the basic nature of the entities that we think about, talk about, and experience.

PHIL 4070: Existentialist Philosophy
SEC 001, TR 3:30-4:45, HLMS 177
Prof. Morriston

PHIL 4110: Contemporary Moral Theory
SEC 001, MWF 2:00-2:50, VAC 1B88
Prof. Heathwood
What makes a person's life go well or badly for her? Which things are of ultimate benefit or harm to us? What is it in our interest to get? If someone is well off, or enjoying a high quality of life, what makes this the case? These are various ways of asking the philosophical question of well-being, which is the focus of this course. We'll begin by trying to answer the question ourselves, before reading what other philosophers have written on the matter. Then we'll study some important philosophical theories and doctrines about well-being, such as hedonism, subjectivism, objectivism, internalism, eudaimonism, perfectionism, and pluralism. We'll devote special attention to desire satisfactionism, including some of the work-in-progress of your humble instructor. We will also investigate controversies about the very concept of well-being, or over what this class is even about.

We will read journal articles and book chapters by contemporary analytic philosophers, which I will make available.

Course requirements will include term papers, exams, class presentations, regular attendance, and participation in discussion. Specific requirements will be settled after the class composition (i.e., number of graduate students and number of undergraduates) has been determined.

Prerequisites for undergraduates: 12 hours philosophy course work, including PHIL 3100, and junior standing.

PHIL 4260: Philosophy of Law
SEC 001, TR 2:00-3:15, CLRE 104
Prof. Hosein
"Philosophy of Law" can refer to a wide range of philosophical topics related to the law. In this course we will be especially concerned with moral questions that arise when thinking about the law, especially the constitutional law of the United States. We will look at how important philosophical debates about the values of democracy, freedom and equality can affect central legal debates about constitutional interpretation in general and discussions of particular clauses. And we will think about whether the existing legal framework best promotes those values. Some questions we will consider include:

  1. Is judicial review undemocratic? How should judges interpret the constitution? Are certain approaches to judicial interpretation more democratic than others?
  2. What is the "freedom of speech"? What is the relationship between democracy and freedom of speech? Would stricter campaign finance regulations enhance people's liberties and the democratic process or be serious blows to freedom and the democratic process? What about other regulations of political speech, such as equal time requirements?
  3. What is discrimination? What does it mean for a state, or the federal government, to deny someone "the equal protection" of its laws? Is there a plausible moral principle that captures this requirement? How should we think about the moral and legal status of sex distinctions in hiring, affirmative action, educational inequalities, and gay-marriage?


PHIL 4340: Epistemology
SEC 001, MWF 1:00-1:50, CLRE 209
Prof. Rupert

PHIL 4360: Metaphysics
SEC 001, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 245
Prof. Cleland

PHIL 4440: Topics in Logic: Mathematical Logic
SEC 001, TR 2:00-3:15, HLMS 177
Prof. Forbes
The course is designed mainly with the needs of philosophy majors/ minors and graduates in mind. For philosophy majors or minors, a grade of at least B+ in Phil 2440 (Symbolic Logic) is recommended. Any other undergraduate who plans to enroll should seek the advice of the instructor.

Course Description: The aim of the course is to present proofs of soundness and completeness results for sentential and first-order systems of natural deduction of the kind commonly taught in Phil 2440. The particular focus will be the Gentzen-style systems of my Phil 2440 textbook Modern Logic (OUP 1994). As time permits, we will look at some first-order model theory beyond the completeness proofs, and also, I hope, the corresponding topics for certain rivals to classical logic, for example, intuitionistic logic and relevance logic.

Textbook: Logic and Metalogic for Philosophers, by Graeme Forbes (available in the bookstore in early January).

Homework assignments will be set on a regular basis and graded, course grades being based on these. The assignments for those taking the course at the 4440 level are (often) different from those for the 5440 level.

PHIL 4800: Open Topics in Philosophy: Gender and Global Justice
SEC 001, TR 2:00-3:15, HLMS 104
Prof. Jaggar
This course highlights the gendered aspects of some contemporary transnational moral wrongs. These are often overlooked in mainstream discussions of global justice. Topics likely to be addressed in this course include:

  1. Human rights, moral relativism, and adaptive preferences
  2. Assessing wellbeing, poverty, and quality of life
  3. Food justice
  4. Gendered divisions of global labor.
  5. Labor migration, including global care chains and sex trafficking
  6. Health including reproductive and mental health.
  7. Fertility and adoption
  8. Gender and militarism
  9. Responsibility, aid, and development
  10. Moral repair and transnational responses to gendered wrongs.

Fall 2013

PHIL 3000: History of Ancient Philosophy
SEC 001, TR 2:00-3:15, HLMS 229
SEC 003, TR 11:00-12:15, MCOL E155
Prof. Lee

PHIL 3010: History of Modern Philosophy
SEC 002, TR 3:30-4:45, ECON 205
Prof. Kaufman

PHIL 3100: Ethical Theory
SEC 001, TR 3:30-4:45, HLMS 211
Prof. Norcross

PHIL 3140: Environmental Ethics
SEC 002, MWF 9:00-9:50, RAMY N1B23
Dr. Purves
SEC 003, MWF 10:00-10:50, CLUB 13
Dr. Sturgis
SEC 004, TR 8:00-9:15, KTCH 234
Dr. Youkey
SEC 005, TR 3:30-4:45, VAC 1B20
Prof. Hale
SEC 006, TR 9:30-10:45, DUAN G2B47
Dr. Youkey
SEC 007, MWF 2:00-2:50, KTCH 234
Dr. Kopec

PHIL 3160: Bioethics
SEC 001, TR 3:30-4:45, HALE 240
SEC 002, TR 2:00-3:15, CLUB 13
Dr. Vance

PHIL 3190: War and Morality
SEC 002, TR 12:30-1:45, RAMY N1B23
Dr. Youkey

PHIL 3200: Social and Political Philosophy
SEC 002, MWF 11:00-11:50, HLMS 229
Prof. Wingo

PHIL 3260: Philosophy and the International Order
SEC 001, TR 9:30-10:45, HLMS 237
SEC 002, TR 11:00-12:15, HLMS 229
Dr. Chamorro

PHIL 3310: Cognitive Science
SEC 001, MWF 2:00-2:50, CLUB 4
Prof. Kim, Prof. Rupert

PHIL 3410: History of Science: Ancients to Newton
SEC 001, TR 9:30-10:45, HLMS 229
Dr. Brindell

PHIL 3480: Critical Thinking and Writing in Philosophy
SEC 001, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 177
Dr. Potter
SEC 002, TR 12:30-1:45, HLMS 196
Prof. Monton

PHIL 3600: Philosophy of Religion
SEC 001, MWF 2:00-2:50, HLMS 229
Dr. Vance

PHIL 3800: Open Topics in Philosophy: Buddhism as Philosophy
SEC 001, MWF 2:00-2:50, HLMS 237
Prof. Zimmerman

PHIL 4010: Single Philosopher: St. Augustine
SEC 001, MWF 12:00-12:50, HLMS 245
Prof. Pasnau

PHIL 4010: Single Philosopher: Rousseau
SEC 003, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 247
Prof. Mills

PHIL 4200: Contemporary Political Philosophy
SEC 001, TR 12:30-1:45, HLMS 263
Prof. Jaggar

PHIL 4210: Classical Greek Political Thought
SEC 001, MWF 12:00-12:50, KTCH 301
Prof. Schutrumpf

PHIL 4250: Marxism
SEC 001, TR 11:00-12:15, MCKN 112
Prof. Pickford

PHIL 4340: Epistemology
SEC 002, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 245
Prof. Huemer

PHIL 4360: Metaphysics
SEC 001, TR 3:30-4:45, HLMS 245
Prof. Tooley

PHIL 4400: Philosophy of Science
SEC 001, TR 2:00-3:15, HLMS 177
Prof. Cleland

PHIL 4460: Modal Logic
SEC 001, TR 12:30-1:45, HLMS 177
Prof. Forbes

Spring 2013

PHIL 3000: History of Ancient Philosophy
SEC 001, TR 12:30-1:45, HLMS 229
Prof. Lee

PHIL 3010: History of Modern Philosophy
SEC 001, MWF 12:00-12:50, HUMN 125
Dr. Potter

PHIL 3100: Ethical Theory
SEC 001, TR 11:00-12:15, HLMS 237
Prof. Norcross

PHIL 3140: Environmental Ethics
SEC 001, MWF 9:00-9:50, HUMN 250
Dr. Sturgis
SEC 002, MWF 10:00-10:50, MUEN E431
SEC 003, MWF 11:00-11:50, MUEN E113
Dr. Zerella
SEC 007, MWF 8:00-8:50, HLMS 177
Dr. Colvin

PHIL 3160: Bioethics
SEC 001, TR 3:30-4:45, HLMS 237
Prof. Chwang
SEC 002, MWF 2:00-2:50, HLMS 237
Dr. Warren

PHIL 3190: War and Morality
SEC 001, TR 3:30-4:45, RAMY N1B23
Dr. Youkey

PHIL 3200: Social and Political Philosophy
SEC 001, MWF 11:00-11:50, HLMS 237
Dr. Sturgis

PHIL 3260: Philosophy and the International Order
SEC 001, TR 8:00-9:15, HLMS 177
Dr. Youkey

PHIL 3430: History of Science: Newton to Einstein
SEC 001, TR 11:00-12:15, KTCH 235
SEC 002, TR 9:30-10:45, VAC 1B88
Dr. Youkey

PHIL 3480: Critical Thinking and Writing in Philosophy
SEC 001, MWF 2:00-2:50, MUEN E130
SEC 002, MWF 10:00-10:50, HLMS 237
Dr. Potter

PHIL 3600: Philosophy of Religion
SEC 001, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 229
Prof. Morriston

PHIL 4010: Single Philosopher: Descartes
SEC 001, TR 12:30-1:45, CLUB 13
Prof. Kaufman

PHIL 4020: Topics in the History of Philosophy: Hellenistic Philosophy
SEC 001, TR 3:30-4:45, VAC 1B88
Prof. Bailey

PHIL 4200: Contemporary Political Philosophy
SEC 002, TR 2:00-3:15, HUMN 125
Prof. Vanderheiden, Prof. Hosein

PHIL 4260: Philosophy of Law
SEC 001, TR 11:00-12:15, GUGG 206
Prof. Hosein

PHIL 4340: Epistemology
SEC 001, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 245
Prof. Huemer

PHIL 4360: Metaphysics
SEC 001, TR 2:00-3:15, HLMS 245
Prof. Cleland

Fall 2012

PHIL 3000: History of Ancient Philosophy
SEC 002, TR 2:00-3:15, HLMS 177
Prof. Bailey

PHIL 3010: History of Modern Philosophy
SEC 002, TR 12:30-1:45, CLRE 104
Prof. Kaufman

PHIL 3100: Ethical Theory
SEC 001, MWF 2:00-2:50, HLMS 267
Prof. Norcross

PHIL 3140: Environmental Ethics
SEC 002, MWF 11:00-11:50, RAMY N1B23
SEC 003, MWF 9:00-9:50, MUEN E064
Dr. Youkey
SEC 004, MWF 3:00-3:50, KTCH 235
SEC 006, MWF 4:00-4:50, RAMY N1B31
Dr. Zerella
SEC 005, TR 3:30-4:45, EKLC E1B20
Prof. Hale

PHIL 3160: Bioethics
SEC 002, MWF 2:00-2:50, HLMS 229
SEC 003, MWF 4:00-4:50, HLMS 229
Dr. Lomelino

PHIL 3180: Critical Thinking: Contemporary Topics
SEC 002, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 177
Dr. Kopec

PHIL 3190: War and Morality
SEC 002, MWF 3:00-3:50, HLMS 211
Dr. Sturgis

PHIL 3200: Social and Political Philosophy
SEC 002, MWF 10:00-10:50, KTCH 118
Prof. Wingo

PHIL 3260: Philosophy and the International Order
SEC 001, TR 9:30-10:45, HLMS 229
SEC 002, TR 3:30-4:45, HLMS 177
Dr. Christian Lee

PHIL 3310: Cognitive Science
SEC 001, TR 11:00-12:15, MUEN D430
Profs. Eisenberg and Rupert

PHIL 3410: History of Science: Ancients to Newton
SEC 001, TR 12:30-1:45, HLMS 177
Dr. Brindell

PHIL 3480: Critical Thinking and Writing in Philosophy
SEC 001, MWF 11:00-11:50, HLMS 177
SEC 002, MWF 2:00-2:50, HLMS 177
Dr. Potter

PHIL 3600: Philosophy of Religion
SEC 880, TR 2:00-3:15, HLMS 196
Prof. Morriston

PHIL 3800: Open Topics in Philosophy: Heidegger and Technology
SEC 001, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 237
Prof. Zimmerman

PHIL 4010: Single Philosopher: Plato
SEC 001, TR 12:30-1:45, HLMS 229
Prof. Bailey

PHIL 4010: Single Philosopher: Hobbes
SEC 003, TR 3:30-4:45, HLMS 263
Prof. Kaufman

PHIL 4340: Epistemology
SEC 002, MWF 3:00-3:50, HLMS 229
Dr. Talbot

PHIL 4360: Metaphysics
SEC 001, TR 11:00-12:15, HLMS 237
Prof. Tooley

PHIL 4450: History and Philosophy of Physics
SEC 001, TR 9:30-10:45, DUAN G131
Prof. Franklin

PHIL 4470: Probability and Rational Choice
SEC 002, TR 12:30-1:45, HLMS 196
Prof. Chwang

PHIL 4490: Philosophy of Language
SEC 001, MWF 1:00-1:50, HLMS 229
Prof. Barnett

Spring 2011

PHIL 3100: Ethical Theory
SEC 001, MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, HLMS 229
Prof. Heathwood

We make value judgments – e.g., “You shouldn't litter,” “It's unfair that some children have no health care,” “Friendship makes life worth living,” “Abortion is wrong,” “Tiger Woods is a scumbag” – all the time. But what are we doing when we do this? Are we describing an objective moral reality, or just expressing our feelings? Are such statements ever true? Can we ever know one to be true? If there are moral facts, are they just a subclass of the natural facts about the world? Assuming that we do have moral obligations, why should we care about them? These are some questions in metaethics, to which the first part of this course will provide an introduction.

Then we will turn to normative ethics, where we attempt to figure out which moral claims – in particular, which fundamental moral principles – are actually true. Our main questions will be, What makes an act right or wrong?, and, What makes a state of affairs good or bad? Consequentialists believe that an act’s rightness or wrongness is to be explained solely in terms of how good or bad its outcome would be. We will explore this theory in detail, as well as theories about what makes an outcome good or bad. Deontologists reject the view that consequences are all that matter. They typically believe that we have special obligations (e.g., to our children, to people to whom we have made promises) that are not explained by the value of outcomes. Deontologists also often believe in constraints against certain kinds of behavior (e.g., killing) even when doing so would lead to the best outcome. We will explore deontology in detail as well.

PHIL 4120: Philosophy and Animals
12:30-1:45 TR
Prof. Norcross

We commonly assume that human beings have certain rights, prominent among which are the right to life and the right to self-determination. These general rights encompass the more specific rights not to be bred and killed for food, and not to be experimented on without our consent. The situation appears to be different with respect to nonhuman animals. Many animals are bred, often in quite unpleasant conditions, in order to be slaughtered and eaten by humans. Many other animals are forcibly subjected to experiments designed to test products or processes whose sole aim is to benefit humans. Very few of these animals sign consent forms. It appears to be a common assumption that animals don't have the same rights as humans, and even that they don't have rights at all. The topic of this course is whether the assumption can be justified. We will consider both the utilitarian approach of Peter Singer that animals deserve equal consideration with humans, and the deontological approach of Tom Regan that animals have equal moral rights with those of humans. In opposition to these views, we will also consider the work of philosophers such as Carl Cohen, Peter Carruthers, and Ray Frey. We will also study the work of some cognitive ethologists on the cognitive abilities of animals.

PHIL 4200/5200: Contemporary Political Philosophy: Race, Ethnicity, and Empire
SEC 001
Prof. Jaggar

This course will explore issues of racial/ethnic justice both in liberal democratic societies and at the global level. The first few weeks of the course will examine various conceptions of race, ethnicity, and racism, along with the philosophical assumptions that inform these conceptions. We will pay special attention to the relationships among biological, psychological, historical, and cultural approaches to understanding race/ethnicity. We will also explore the relationships between race/ethnicity, on the one hand, and, on the other hand, such social categories as gender, class, ability, and sexuality. The middle few weeks of the course will address issues of racial/ethnic justice in liberal democratic societies. Topics may include indigenous rights, cultural recognition, preferential treatment, and political representation. The last few weeks of the course will consider issues of racial/ethnic justice on a global scale. Topics may include global distributive justice, migration, environmental racism, and humanitarian intervention. The course may conclude by considering the topic of reparations and/or by seeking to imagine a post-racist but not necessarily post-racial future.

 

Fall 2010

PHIL 3010: History of Modern Philosophy
SEC 001, TuTh 2:00PM - 3:15PM, HLMS 237
Prof. Hanna

The fundamental problem of modern philosophy is this: How can the rational human subject's fully personal conception of herself and the world be reconciled with the fully impersonal conception of human beings and their world that is developed by modern science? In this course we will address this fundamental problem in various ways by carefully reading and critically studying several classic philosophical texts of the 17th and 18th centuries by Descartes, Pascal, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, & Reid. Topics to be considered include: rationalism vs. empiricism; skepticism, knowledge, & certainty; proofs for the existence of God & natural religion; the nature of reality; the nature of persons & freedom of the will; the problem of evil & theodicy; & the nature of human cognition.

NB. This course ALSO provides an excellent foundation for my PHIL 4010 Philosophy of Kant course, which will be taught by me in Spring 2011.

Primary text: F.E. Baird (ed.), Modern Philosophy.
Assignments: Weekly quizzes on the readings + two required 8-10 page papers + optional third 8-10 page paper

PHIL 3100: Ethical Theory
SEC 001, TuTh 11:00AM - 12:15PM, CLUB 13
Prof. Heathwood

We make value judgments – e.g., “You shouldn't litter,” “It's unfair that some children have no health care,” “Friendship makes life worth living,” “Abortion is wrong,” “Tiger Woods is a scumbag” – all the time. But what are we doing when we do this? Are we describing an objective moral reality, or just expressing our feelings? Are such statements ever true? Can we ever know one to be true? If there are moral facts, are they just a subclass of the natural facts about the world? Assuming that we do have moral obligations, why should we care about them? These are some questions in metaethics, to which the first part of this course will provide an introduction.

Then we will turn to normative ethics, where we attempt to figure out which moral claims – in particular, which fundamental moral principles – are actually true. Our main questions will be, What makes an act right or wrong?, and, What makes a state of affairs good or bad? Consequentialists believe that an act’s rightness or wrongness is to be explained solely in terms of how good or bad its outcome would be. We will explore this theory in detail, as well as theories about what makes an outcome good or bad. Deontologists reject the view that consequences are all that matter. They typically believe that we have special obligations (e.g., to our children, to people to whom we have made promises) that are not explained by the value of outcomes. Deontologists also often believe in constraints against certain kinds of behavior (e.g., killing) even when doing so would lead to the best outcome. We will explore deontology in detail as well.

PHIL 3140: Environmental Ethics

Dr. Sturgis

A central question we will focus on in this course is whether nature, understood as a biotic community, has intrinsic value (value beyond its usefulness to us). We will investigate just what intrinsic value is, and whether it makes sense to speak of it as existing apart from any valuers. If value does depend on valuers, what then can we say about the possibility of humans valuing things beyond their usefulness to humans?

While some of these philosophical questions will take us into abstract territory we will put them in a practical and personal context: the relationship of what we eat to our environment. We will consider questions like, What does it mean to say that organic food is too expensive? What are the societal benefits of only having to spend 20% of our income on conventional food? Are we obligated to eat locally grown food or does eating locally support wealthier farmers and harm those who need our support most?

PHIL 3260: Philosophy and the International Order: Global Justice
Prof. Hosein

In an increasingly globalized world we are often forced to consider moral questions about how to treat people who are not within our own political community. What should we do about global poverty? Are we entitled to exclude would-be immigrants? When is war justified?

In this class we will consider these and other important practical issues in light of some broader philosophical questions about the global sphere, such as whether there any limits on what states can do to secure their own security and whether we owe more to members of our state than to foreigners.

PHIL 3340: Epistemology
Prof. Huemer
The course will deal with such questions as the following: Do we know anything about the world outside us? Does empirical knowledge have a foundation? Are we directly aware of physical objects? How do we know about such things as good, bad, right, and wrong? Is there knowledge independent of experience? How should we deal with disagreement, especially among experts? When and why should we rely on testimony?

Most readings will be from Epistemology: Contemporary Readings. Also recommended: Skepticism and the Veil of Perception.

PHIL 4010: Single Philosopher: Nietzsche
SEC 003, 11:00 - 12:15 TR, HLMS 245
Prof. Zimmerman

In this course, we will read two major works by Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil and Thus Spoke Zarathustra, along with a few shorter works. One of Nietzsche’s major concerns was that European civilization would end in nihilism after the “death” of God and after the triumph of a scientific naturalism that depicts human life as an accidental event in a meaningless universe. As a possible antidote to nihilism, Nietzsche posited a new goal for European humanity: the Overman. Commentators often regard the Overman as a regulative ideal, an aesthetic vision needed to help justify human life. In recent decades, however, a number of influential people have begun to describe the Overman not as an ideal, but rather as an event that will come to fruition in the near future, as we redesign the human genome in ways that confer upon it much longer life spans; make possible exceptional aesthetic, moral, athletic, sensual, sensory, and intellectual capacities; and bring an end to many forms of suffering. This prospect is known as transhumanism. A major point of focus for this course will be whether Nietzsche’s Overman is consistent with the supposed near-reality of genetically-engineered super-humans. To allow for an informed judgment, we will also read essays by transhumanists and others who assert explicitly that Nietzsche’s ideal of the Overman anticipates efforts to transform humankind through breakthroughs in medicine, science, and technology.



  

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