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Student Interest Survey, Fall 2000 and Fall 1999

In 1999 and 2000, the office of Planning, Budget and Analysis assisted A Matter of Degree program in surveying new freshmen and transfer students at orientation and into the first month of classes. The purpose of the survey was to encourage incoming students to become involved with various extracurricular activities and organizations on the CU-Boulder campus, and to help them become involved with student groups and activities early on in their CU career. As a result of the surveys, CU-Boulder student organizations and clubs were given lists of names of students who were interested in that particular organization and asked to contact them. 

In 1999, the questionnaire was a scannable form that was distributed at orientation to incoming students, and non-respondents were aggressively followed up and encouraged to reply through assistance from resident hall advisors during the first month of classes.  In 2000, however, the questionnaire was a web-based instrument and it was not administered until the first month of classes, at which time students were already busy and less likely to respond.  See the Survey methods and response rates section below for a summary of the two survey administrations and to view both questionnaires.

Given the major differences in the design of the questionnaires, the differences in response rates, survey methods and timing, we did not compare results from 2000 to those of 1999. The data from 1999 served primarily as a pilot to determine how to proceed in surveying this same constituent in 2000; no formal report was issued. Both the 1999 and 2000 data were also used to assist A Matter of Degree Program in setting up a system whereby entering freshmen and transfers could be linked up with UCB student organizations and clubs in their first semester at CU-Boulder.

Initially, there were plans to repeat the survey in 2001 with an enhanced web-based questionnaire. ITS and A Matter of Degree Program had hoped to produce a web interface that could provide immediate feedback on the student organizations of interest to those students completing the survey. However, because of limited resources in these departments, the plans for re-administering this enhanced survey were never implemented.

Results from the 2000 survey are summarized in the tables listed below. For further information about the results of this survey, contact Bob Maust, principal investigator for the A Matter of Degree Program .

Survey methods and response rates

  • In 1999, the survey was distributed at three different time points: at two separate orientation periods: one mid-summer, one at the end, in August., and one last attempt to get feedback in the dorms the first week of school, with assistance from the RA’s. The response rate was quite good, given the captive audience at Orientation and the RA-assistance. 2,008 new freshmen and transfers responded (out of an approximate 5,500), which was over 1/3 responding.
    • The 1999 questionnaire was a scannable form, and the questions were worded and analyzed differently. For EACH activity, organization or sport, students were asked to respond on a scale from 1 to 4 (A to D), where 1= "Interested in the activity for college, but never participated in it in high school," 2=" participated 1-2 years in high school," 3=" participated 3-4 years in high school," and 4="participated in a leadership role, regardless of number of years involved."
  • In 2000, the survey was administered completely via the Web, but it was not done until the fall semester was well underway, near the end of September. Pre-notification letters were sent to all new freshmen and transfer students, and then an email invitation to complete the survey on the Web was sent to 6,047 new freshmen/transfers, who had current email addresses. The RA’s help was also enlisted, and they were asked to encourage students in their dorms to fill out the survey. The response rate was quite low, with only 655 unique individuals responding -- an 11% response rate.
    • The 2000 web-based questionnaire was designed quite differently from that of the 1999 questionnaire. The college activities were listed separately, and students checked off all activities they were interested in. They were asked about high school activities and their leadership involvement in these in a separate section that was open-ended in format. For instance, they were asked to write in the TOP 3 activities they participated in in high school, and then to mark whether they had held a leadership role in that activity.
    • Issues encountered during the 2000 web survey administration: The Web is certainly an easier and faster way to collect survey data. However, we have since discovered that many students do not use their CU email accounts, and so we estimate that anywhere from 1/4 to 1/3 of the sample members may not have even seen the student e-memo invitation to fill out the survey. Also, the timing of the survey may have been another factor in lowering the response rate: e.g., students may have already felt "connected" to various extracurricular activities and been too busily involved in the semester to respond; and the length of the survey instrument may have also been a deterrent. For example, we noticed there were about 1400 hits to the survey entrance page, but only 712 completed surveys.

    Results from the Fall 2000 Web survey

    Demographics of the respondents

    The tables below show certain characteristics of respondents, including the number who responded from each residence hall. The following summarizes some major findings from these tables. (We did not try to determine response rates by residence hall, but list this information here to provide another characterization of the respondents.)

    • Females were more likely than males to respond to the survey.
    • Residents more likely than non-residents to respond.
    • About ¼ of respondents did NOT want their names posted to lists with other students interested in the same activities.
    Fall 2000 Student Interest Inventory Results - Demographics of Respondents   
    
    RESPONDENTS:                          POPULATION:
                                    
    ENTRLVL    Frequency   Percent        ENTRY LEVEL  
    ------------------------------   
    Freshman        576      88%          Freshmam  --  92%
    Transfer         79      12%          Transfers --   8% 
    
    
                                    
    GENDER     Frequency   Percent        GENDER
    ------------------------------        
    Female          401      61%          Female    --  48% 
    Male            253      39%          Male      --  52%
    
    Frequency Missing = 1
    
    
    REPORTING RESIDENCY
                                        
    SCD_RES       Frequency   Percent     RESIDENCY
    ---------------------------------
    Non-Residents      228      37%       Non-RES   --  45%
    Residents          395      63%       Residents --  55% 
    
    Frequency Missing = 32
    
                                                                      Cumulative  Cumulative
    RESIDENCE HALL  (Self-Reported)               Frequency   Percent   Frequency    Percent
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Baker Hall                                         43       7.3          43        7.3
    Cheyenne Arapaho Hall                              35       6.0          78       13.3
    College Inn                                         5       0.9          83       14.1
    Farrand Hall                                       37       6.3         120       20.4
    Hallett Hall                                       39       6.6         159       27.1
    Kittredge Halls: Andrews                           32       5.5         191       32.5
    Kittredge Halls: Arnett                            29       4.9         220       37.5
    Kittredge Halls: Buckingham                        32       5.5         252       42.9
    Kittredge Halls: Kittredge West                    21       3.6         273       46.5
    Kittredge Halls: Smith                             38       6.5         311       53.0
    Libby Hall                                         37       6.3         348       59.3
    OTHER (Kensington, Timber Ridge, Sterling)         35       6.0         383       65.2
    Reed Hall                                           4       0.7         387       65.9
    Sewall Hall                                        32       5.5         419       71.4
    The Quad: Aden Hall                                13       2.2         432       73.6
    The Quad: Brackett Hall                            16       2.7         448       76.3
    The Quad: Cockerell Hall                            9       1.5         457       77.9
    The Quad: Crosman Hall                             14       2.4         471       80.2
    Will Village: Darley North                         29       4.9         500       85.2
    Will Village: Darley South                         12       2.0         512       87.2
    Will Village: Stearns East                         35       6.0         547       93.2
    Will Village: Stearns West                         31       5.3         578       98.5
    Willard Hall                                        9       1.5         587      100.0
    
    Frequency Missing = 68
    
    
    OK To Post Name to List?
                                    Cumulative  Cumulative
    OKTOPST    Frequency   Percent   Frequency    Percent
    ------------------------------------------------------
    No              157      24.2         157       24.2
    Yes             492      75.8         649      100.0
    
    Frequency Missing = 6
    

    Number of activities selected by respondents

    • On average, the 655 respondents picked about 10 college activities they were interested in.
    • The most frequently selected number of activities was between 8. and 9.
    • However, these new freshmen and transfer students chose anywhere from 0 to 31 activities.
      • 25% of respondents selected 0 to 6 activities,
      • 50% selected 0 to 9 activities,
      • and 75% of respondents selected up to 12 college activities.

    The top 5-6 activities selected by respondents

    • There was much overlap in the top 5-6 activities selected by all students, and by each of the sub-groups.
    • All groups (students, females, males, residents and non-residents) selected Study Abroad, Skiing/Snowboarding, and Habitat for Humanity as ONE of their top 5 choices, but the proportion selecting each activity varied greatly across groups. (See the table below for detailed comparisons.)

    TOP 5-6 College Activities

     


    TOP 6 FOR ALL

    ALL RESPONDENTS

    Study Abroad

    59%

    Skiing/Snowboarding

    45%

    Habitat for Humanity

    38%

    Volunteer out of school/own time

    35%

    Hiking

    31%

    Volunteer Clubs Key Club, etc

    30%

       

    TOP 5 for FEMALES

    FEMALES

    Study Abroad

    68%

    Habitat for Humanity

    47%

    Volunteer out of school/own time

    44%

    Skiing/Snowboarding

    41%

    Volunteer Clubs Key Club, etc

    36%

       

    TOP 6 for MALES

    MALES

    Skiing/Snowboarding

    54%

    Study Abroad

    46%

    Hiking

    35%

    Frisbee

    33%

    Habitat for Humanity

    26%

    Fraternities or Sororities

    26%

       

    TOP 5 for RES

    RESIDENTS

    Study Abroad

    54%

    Habitat for Humanity

    39%

    Skiing/Snowboarding

    38%

    Volunteer out of school/own time

    35%

    Volunteer Clubs Key Club, etc

    31%

       

    TOP 6 for NON-RES

    NON-RESIDENTS

    Study Abroad

    68%

    Skiing/Snowboarding

    61%

    Hiking

    39%

    Habitat for Humanity

    37%

    Volunteer out of school/own time

    34%

    Outward Bound* (rock clmb, camping)

    33%



    COLLEGE ACTIVITIES -- Overall Findings

    • Over half (59%) of all respondents (N=655) mentioned they were interested in Study Abroad, while almost half (46%) of freshmen/new transfers said they were interested in skiing and/or snowboarding.
    • 30% or more of all respondents selected the following top 5 activities as ones they were most interested in (See Table B-1 for a complete listing).
      • Study Abroad (59%)
      • Skiing/Snowboarding (46%)
      • Habitat for Humanity (38%)
      • Volunteering out of school/own time (34%)
      • Hiking (31%)
    [an error occurred while processing this directive]

    COLLEGE ACTIVITIES -- Differences by Residency

    • Non-residents (N=228) were much more likely than residents (N=395) to say they were interested in participating in the following activities (See Table B-2 for the complete listing):
      • Skiing/Snowboarding (61% of Non-Res versus 38% of Res)
      • Study Abroad (68% of Non-res versus 54% of Res)
      • Hiking (39% of Non-Res versus 27% of Res)
      • Outward Bound* (rock climbing, etc.) (33% Non-Res versus 22% Res)

    COLLEGE ACTIVITIES -- Differences by Gender

    There were many differences by gender, including expected ones, e.g., types of sports, and other ones that were less expected. Some of the activities showing the largest differences by gender are listed below. (See Table B-3 for the complete listing.)

    • Females were much more interested in the following than were males.
      • Study Abroad (68% of females versus 45% males)
      • Habitat for Humanity (46% females vs. 25% males)
      • Volunteering out of school/own time (43% vs. 21%)
      • Volunteer Clubs, Key Club, etc. (36% vs. 22%)
      • Dance (28% vs. 4%)
      • School Newspaper/Yearbook (24% vs. 9%)
      • Peer Counseling (22% vs. 7%)
    • Males were much more interested in the following activities than were females.
      • Frisbee (33% of males, 12% of females)
      • Football (18% of males vs. 3% of females)
      • Skiing/snowboarding (54% of males vs. 41% of females)
      • Hockey (15% males, 3% females)
      • Golf (14% males, 2% females)
      • Cycling (16% males, 4% females)
      • Basketball (20% males, 9% females)
      • Personal band outside of school (17% of males vs 6% of females)
    • In general, it appears that the activities chosen more frequently by females than males are ones that have a more ‘working group’ focus, whereas those chosen more by males than females are primarily sports-related.

    High School Activities, including whether they held a leadership role

    • The two final questions in the survey asked about high school activities. One item asked students to list up to THREE activities or organizations in which they had participated. And a subsequent question asked them to note -- FOR EACH ACTIVITY -- whether:
      • they had held a leadership role
      • they did NOT hold a leadership role
      • a leadership role was not applicable to that activity
    • 96% of ALL respondents mentioned participating in AT LEAST ONE high school activity, 85% mentioned two, and 72% mentioned participation in three activities. Females were more likely than males to list more than one activity.
      • 90% of females listed two activities, whereas only 77% of males listed two.
      • 78% of females listed three activities, and only 62% of males did.
    • Of the 631 (96%) respondents who mentioned ANY high school activity, 11% mentioned ONLY ONE, 14% listed TWO high school activities, and 75% mentioned THREE different activities.
    • About 1/4 of the 631 respondents reported they did NOT have a leadership role in any of the one to three activities they listed. Of these students, over half reported they did NOT hold a leadership role because it was not available for the activity they mentioned.
    • 76% of the 631 respondents said they held one or more leadership roles amongst the three activities they reported.
      • 28% said they held ONE leadership role
      • 31% said they held TWO roles
      • 17% reported THREE leadership roles

    The top 16 most mentioned high school activities

    Of the total 631 respondents who mentioned ANY high school activity, a minimum of 30 or more students mentioned the following 16 activities, and the proportion of these respondents who listed each activity ranged from 5% to 17%. Across the 3 open-ended "high school activity" questions, there were 1,718 individual responses and 334 unique "write-in" categories.

    • National Honor Society (17%)
    • Student Government (14%)
    • Soccer (9%)
    • Swimming (8%)
    • Choir (8%
    • Theatre (8%)
    • Tennis (6%)
    • Track and Field (6%)
    • Volleyball (6%)
    • Band (6%)
    • Baseball/Softball (6%)
    • Cross County (6%)
    • Dance (5%)
    • Key Club (5%)
    • Yearbook (5%)
    • Cheerleading (5%)

    See Table C for a list of all High School activities – sorted by most to least frequently mentioned activity. This list also shows the proportion of students for each activity who held a leadership role in that activity.


    Open-ended write-in comments

    Questions 6 through 10 contained the option of 'Other, Please Specify'. Below are links to the 'Other' responses for each of these questions

    IR@colorado.edu csk--W:\pba\surveys\special\stuint\index.htm -- updated 9/23/04

Last revision 07/08/05


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