Approved Courses by Category

This list of approved courses gives students the freedom to structure their PACS program of study in ways that focus on aspects of the field that best address their interests and career plans. To do this most effectively, students are urged to work closely with their advisors to select courses that complement and reinforce one another. Departments offer new and special topics courses each semester, so please check with the PACS Director if you wish to include courses that are not listed here.

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  • ANTH 1100 -- Exploring a Non-Western Culture: The Tamils
    Exploring a Non-Western Culture: The Tamils. Surveys the social and economic patterns, ideas and values, and aesthetic achievements of the Tamils, a Hindu people who live in South India and Sri Lanka. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ANTH 1105 -- Exploring a Non-Western Culture: Tibet
    Exploring a Non-Western Culture: Tibet. Introduction to Tibetan culture, history, religion, and society from an anthropological perspective, including traditional as well as contemporary dimensions. Topics will include Tibetan Buddhism, politics, nomadism, gender, refugee issues, and the global Tibetan diaspora, all framed within the larger methods and concepts of cultural anthropology. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ANTH 1110 -- Exploring a Non-Western Culture: Japan
    Exploring a Non-Western Culture: Japan. Examines modern Japan in terms of cultural styles, social patterns, work practices, aesthetic traditions, ecological conditions, and historical events that shape it as both a Non-Western culture and a modern industrial state. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ANTH 1115 -- The Caribbean in Post-Colonial Perspective
    The Caribbean in PostColonial Perspective. Introduces the student to the varied peoples and cultures in the Caribbean region, emphasizing the historical, colonial, and contemporary politicaleconomic contexts of their social structure and cultural patterns. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ANTH 1120 -- Exploring a Non-Western Culture: Hopi and Navajo
    Exploring a Non-Western Culture: Hopi and Navajo. Explores two American Indian cultures, Hopi and Navajo, and cultural interrelationships from the prehistoric through the contemporary period, using an integrated, holistic, and humanistic viewpoint. Same as ETHN 1123. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ANTH 1140 -- Exploring a Non-Western Culture: The Maya
    Exploring a Non-Western Culture: The Maya. Explores the culture of the Maya of Central America, emphasizing their material adaptations, social organizations, ideals and values, and artistic achievements in the past and the present. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ANTH 1145 -- Exploring a Non-Western Culture: The Aztecs
    Exploring a Non-Western Culture: The Aztecs. Explores the culture of the Aztec people of Central Mexico: their subsistence, society, religion, and achievements, as well as the impact of the Aztec empire in Mesoamerica. Also reviews the clash of a Non-Western society with the western world with the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ANTH 1150 -- Exploring a Non-Western Culture: Regional Cultures of Africa
    Exploring a Non-Western Culture: Regional Cultures of Africa. Explores a small number of cultures in a specific subregion of Africa from an integrated holistic viewpoint, emphasizing material adaptations, social patterns, ideas and values, and aesthetic achievements. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ANTH 1170 -- Exploring Culture and Gender through Film
    Exploring Culture and Gender through Film. Uses films and written texts to explore the concepts of culture and gender, as well as ethnicity and race. By looking at gender, ethnicity, and race crossculturally, students will know how these concepts are constructed in their own society, as well as in others. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ANTH 1200 -- Culture and Power
    Culture and Power. Compares contemporary sociopolitical systems across cultures, from Non-Western tribal groups to modern states. Introduces students to anthropological approaches for understanding and analyzing political forces, processes, and institutions that affect cultures such as colonialism, warfare, violence,ethnicity, migration, and globalization. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • ANTH 2009 -- Modern Issues, Ancient Times
    Modern Issues, Ancient Times. Considers issues of vital importance to humans, both now and in ancient times. Topics such as food, death, sex, family, literacy, or power are explored to consider how ancient societal norms and attitudes evolved, and how they relate to modern culture. Draws on material and literary evidence to develop an understanding of the complexities of ancient life. Same as CLAS 2009. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

  • ANTH 3010 -- The Human Animal
    The Human Animal. Identifies genetic, anatomical, physiological, social, and behavioral characteristics humans share with other mammals and primates. Explores how these characteristics are influenced by modern culture. Prereq., ANTH 2010 or equivalent. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • ANTH 3100 -- Africa: Peoples and Societies in Change
    Africa: Peoples and Societies in Change. Examines culture and politics in Africa through works by anthropologists and historians, as well as novels, films, and journalistic accounts. Special attention is devoted to the ways in which various African cultures have creatively and resiliently responded to the slave trade, European colonialism, and postcolonialism.

  • ANTH 3110 -- Ethnography of Mexico and Central America
    Ethnography of Mexico and Central America. A broad overview, focusing on Mexico and Guatemala. Major topics include ethnohistory, indigenous and mestizo peoples, and contemporary problems and issues.

  • ANTH 3130 -- North American Indians: Traditional Cultures
    North American Indians: Traditional Cultures. Comprehensive survey of native cultures of America north of Mexico, including a review of their natural environments, prehistory, languages, and major institutions for various culture areas. Restricted to sophomores/juniors/seniors. Same as ETHN 3133.

  • ANTH 3160 -- Peoples of the South Pacific
    Peoples of the South Pacific. Surveys traditional island cultures and contemporary changes in the Pacific, focusing on how the Pacific Islands were first settled, some of the great anthropologists who studied the islanders, and how current environmental changes, such as global warming, threaten the future existence of the islands. Restricted to juniors/seniors.

  • ANTH 3170 -- America: An Anthropological Perspective
    America: An Anthropological Perspective. Historical and contemporary aspects of American life are considered from an anthropological perspective. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context.

  • ANTH 3180 -- Gender, Culture, and Sexuality
    Gender, Culture, and Sexuality. Focuses on gender, that is, the making of men and women, and how gender is culturally constructed in different societies. Gender describes many areas of behavior, feelings, thoughts, and fantasies that cannot be understood as primarily biologically produced. Sexuality and sexual systems are sometimes viewed as products of particular genderizing practices, but recent theories suggest that sexual systems themselves constitute gender. Prereq., ANTH 2100. Similar to WMST 2080.

  • ANTH 3218 -- Peoples and Cultures of West Africa
    Peoples and Cultures of West Africa. Deals with the history and anthropology of selected west African societies in the period before the imposition of European colonial rule. Same as HIST 3218.

  • ANTH 3300 -- Elements of Religion
    Elements of Religion. Explores universal components of religion, as inferred from religions of the world, ranging from smallerscale oral to largerscale literate traditions. Restricted to sophomores/juniors/seniors. Same as ETHN 3301.

  • ANTH 4050 -- Anthropology of Jews and Judaism
    Anthropology of Jews and Judaism. Explores topics in Jewish anthropology. Course will use the lens of anthropological inquiry to explore, discover and analyze different concepts within Jewish culture. Topics explored will include customs, religious practices, languages, ethnic and regional subdivisions, occupations, social composition, and folklore. Courses will explore fundamental questions about the definition of Jewish identity, practices and communities. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours. Same as JWST 4050.

  • ANTH 4505 -- Globalization and Transnational Culture
    Globalization and Transnational Culture. Covers the historical foundations for contemporary global change, addressing colonialism, global outsourcing, and cultural imperialism, with a particular emphasis on gender, class, and consumerism. Prereq., ANTH 2100.

  • ANTH 4510 -- Applied Cultural Anthropology
    Applied Cultural Anthropology. Analysis of problems of cultural change due to contacts between people of different cultures. Restricted to senior ANTH or ETHN majors. Same as ETHN 4521 and ANTH 5510.

  • ANTH 4520 -- Symbolic Anthropology
    Symbolic Anthropology. Explores anthropological approaches to the study of symbolic systems, including cosmology, myth, religion, ritual, and art, as well as everyday patterns of metaphor and the presentation of self. Theoretical issues include semiotics, psychoanalysis, structuralism, liminality, and critical theory. Prereq., ANTH 2100 or instructor consent. Same as ANTH 5520.

  • ANTH 4530 -- Theoretical Foundations of Sociocultural Anthropology
    Theoretical Foundations of Sociocultural Anthropology. Critically examines the pivotal schools of 20th century social theory that have shaped modern sociocultural anthropology, including the ideas of cultural evolutionism, Marxism, Durkheim, Weber, Freud, structuralism, postmodernism, and contemporary anthropological approaches. Includes primary readings and seminarstyle discussion. Prereq., ANTH 2100 or instructor consent. Same as ANTH 5530.

  • ANTH 4560 -- North American Indian Acculturation
    North American Indian Acculturation. Comprehensive survey of changes in the native cultures of America north of Mexico caused by occupation of the continent by Old World populations, including a review of processes of contact, environmental changes, changes in major institutions, the nature of federal/state administration, the reservation system, and contemporary developments. Restricted to senior ANTH or ETHN majors. Same as ETHN 4563 and ANTH 5560. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ANTH 4580 -- The Holocaust: An Anthropological Perspective
    The Holocaust: An Anthropological Perspective. Focuses on the Holocaust during the Third Reich, which involved the murder of millions of people, including six million Jews. Reviews the Holocaust’s history, dynamics, and consequences as well as other genocides of the 20th century, using an anthropological approach. Restricted to juniors/seniors. Same as JWST 4580.

  • ANTH 4600 -- Human Ecology: Cultural Aspects
    Human Ecology: Cultural Aspects. Examines the relationship between environment and human behavior, emphasizing social organization. Special attention given to examining the extent to which the environment influences subsistence strategies, settlement patterns, social relationships among different groups, and family structure.

  • ANTH 4620 -- Nationalism and Cultural Citizenship
    Nationalism and Cultural Citizenship. Explores the nature of ethnic conflict, nationalism, and cultural citizenship in different contexts, including the United States. Is the nationstate dead? What effect do extranational and transnational organizations/institutions (e.g., European Union) have on the development of nationalism? Through the exploration of contemporary theory and case studies, this class will address these important contemporary concerns. Prereq., ANTH 2100.

  • ANTH 4630 -- Nomadic Peoples of East Africa
    Nomadic Peoples of East Africa. Examines the issues of current concern in the study of East African pastoral peoples. The first half of the course is devoted to historical perspectives and the second half explores the transition from subsistence to market oriented economies. Restricted to junior and senior ANTH majors. Same as ANTH 5630.

  • ANTH 4690 -- Anthropology of Tibet
    Anthropology of Tibet. Explores the culture of Tibet in both historical and thematic manners, considering the longterm development of Tibetan cultural practices and institutions as well as many of the abrupt changes introduced to Tibet in the 20th century. Topics covered include region, politics, gender, warfare, poetry and literature, and life under Chinese rule and as refugees around the world. Prereq., ANTH 2100.

  • ANTH 4730 -- Latin American Politics and Culture through Film and Text
    Latin American Politics and Culture through Film and Text. Introduces students to the political cultures and societies of Latin America. Through historical and ethnographic text, and documentary and nondocumentary cinema, this course will explore class relations, ideology, and resistance from the conquest to the present. Prereq., ANTH 2100. Same as ANTH 5730.

  • ANTH 4740 -- Peoples and Cultures of Brazil
    Peoples and Cultures of Brazil. Thematically surveys theoretical and ethnographic issues that have been important in understanding Brazil. Read and write critically about textual and visual representations of Brazil presented in the course. Prereq., ANTH 2100; three or more cultural anthropology courses recommended.

  • ANTH 4750 -- Culture and Society in South Asia
    Culture and Society in South Asia. Intensive analysis of major issues in anthropological research on South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka), including kinship, gender, marriage, caste system, religion and ritual, ethnic conflict, and social change. Prereq., ANTH 2100 or instructor consent. Same as ANTH 5750.

  • ANTH 4760 -- Ethnography of Southeast Asia and Indonesia
    Ethnography of Southeast Asia and Indonesia. Introduces the historical, political, and cultural dimensions of Southeast Asia, focusing primarily on Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Indonesia, with some coverage of mainland Southeast Asia. Prereq., ANTH 2100. Restricted to juniors or seniors. Same as ANTH 5760.

  • ANTH 4800 -- Language and Culture
    Language and Culture. Same as LING 4800.

  • ARAB 1011 -- Introduction to Arab Civilizations
    Introduction to Arab Civilizations. Provides an interdisciplinary overview of the cultures of the Arabicspeaking peoples of Southwest Asia and North Africa through historical readings, literature, and film. Texts include medieval literary and philosophical texts, modern novels, documentaries, and feature films. Taught in English.

  • ARAB 3230 -- Islamic Culture and the Iberian Peninsula
    Islamic Culture and the Iberian Peninsula. Examines Islamic, especially Arab, culture and history as it relates to the Iberian Peninsula from 92 A.H./711 C.E to the present. Taught in English. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

  • ARAB 3340 -- Representing Islam
    Representing Islam. Explores the cultural politics of representations of the Arab and Islamic worlds both with an emphasis on literary representations of the Islamic world in travel narratives and novels from both the West and the Arab world. Examines historical, anthropological, and visual texts to consider how Islam has been narrated in colonial European imaginings about the Islamic world as well as contemporary representations.

  • ASIA 1000 -- Introduction to South and Southeast Asian Civilizations
    Introduction to South and Southeast Asian Civilizations. Interdisciplinary survey course, emphasizing cultural developments in the Indian subcontinent that influenced Indonesia and mainland Southeast Asia. Foundation course required for the Asian studies major. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity or historical context.

  • CHIN 1012 (3) -- Introduction to Chinese Civilization
    Introduction to Chinese Civilization. An interdisciplinary introduction from ancient to modern times. Arts, literature, politics, social relations, religion, and material culture are studied in terms of significant themes and ideas pertaining to the civilization of China. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • CHIN 1061 -- Boudoirs, Books, Battlefields: Voices and Images of Chinese Women
    Boudoirs, Books, Battlefields: Voices and Images of Chinese Women. Explores narrative and visual representations of women throughout Chinese history. Emphasizes how modern values of freedom and equality have transformed women’s lives and shaped their aspirations in the 20th century. Course materials include memoirs, novels, ethnographies, documentaries, and feature films. No knowledge of Chinese is necessary. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • CHIN 3441 -- Chinese Language and Society
    Chinese Language and Society. Deals with major linguistic characteristics of Chinese as a medium of communication. Discusses complex linguistic processing of social status and empathy relationships, for example, with reference to the structure of Chinese society and political system. Requires no knowledge of Chinese. Prereq., junior standing or instructor consent.

  • COMM 2400 -- Discourse, Culture and Identities
    Discourse, Culture and Identities. Examines how aspects of talk (e.g., turntaking, speech acts, narratives, dialect, and stance indicators) link with identities (e.g., ethnic and racial, age, gender, workrelated, and personal). Considers how communication is central to constructing who people are and examines social controversies related to talk and identities. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • COMM 3410 -- Intercultural Communication
    Intercultural Communication. Explores complex relationships between culture and communication processes from various conceptual perspectives, such as social, psychological, interpretive, and critical. Considers the important role of context (e.g., social, historical, and cultural) in intercultural interactions. Recommended prereqs., COMM 1210 and 1600. Restricted to juniors or seniors only. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • COMR 1800 -- Visual Literacy: Images and Ideologies
    Visual Literacy: Images and Ideologies. Explores the relationship between visual images and cultural values, including how we process visual information, the evolution of conventions in various media, common visual portrayals, and ethical issues. Restricted to students in the COMM RAP program. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (formerly the Department of Environmental, Population, and Organismic Biology) offers two general biology sequences.

  • EDUC 3013 (3) -- School and Society
    School and Society. Introduces the real world of schools, teaching, and learning. Examines issues of diversity and equity from different disciplinary lenses, including history, philosophy, sociology, and anthropology. Restricted to sophomores, juniors, or seniors only. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies or human diversity.

  • ENGL 3217 -- Topics in Gender Studies
    Topics in Gender Studies. Studies special topics in gender studies; specially designed for English majors. Topics vary each semester. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours for different topics. Prereq., sophomore standing.

  • ENGL 3796 -- Queer Theory
    Queer Theory. Surveys theoretical, critical, and historical writings in the context of lesbian, bisexual, and gay literature. Examines relationships among aesthetic, cultural, and political agendas, and literary and visual texts of the 20th century. Prereq., sophomore standing. Same as LGBT 3796.

  • ETHN 1025 -- Introduction to Asian American Studies
    Introduction to Asian American Studies. Examines the various factors that define minority groups and their positions in American society using Asian Americans as a case study. Emphasizes the perspectives and methodologies of the discipline of ethnic studies. Formerly AAST 1015. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies or human diversity.

  • ETHN 1123 -- Exploring a Non-Western Culture: Hopi and Navajo
    Exploring a Non-Western Culture: Hopi and Navajo. Explores two American Indian cultures, Hopi and Navajo, and cultural interrelationships from the prehistoric through the contemporary period, using an integrated, holistic, and humanistic viewpoint. Same as ANTH 1120. Formerly AIST 1125. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ETHN 2002 -- Introduction to Africana Studies
    Introduction to Africana Studies. Overview of Africana studies as a field of investigation, its origins, and history. Formerly BLST 2000. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ETHN 2003 -- Introduction to American Indian Studies
    Introduction to American Indian Studies. Explores the attainments of various American Indian civilizations in the period immediately prior to first contact with Europeans. Examines agriculture, architecture, governance and social organization, medicine, mathematics, and population. Formerly AIST 2000. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ETHN 2013 -- Critical Issues in Native North America
    Critical Issues in Native North America. Explores a series of issues including regulations of population, land and resource holdings, water rights, education, religious freedom, military obligations, the sociopolitical role of men and women, selfgovernance, and legal standing as these pertain to American Indian life. Formerly AIST 2015. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity or United States context.

  • ETHN 2064 -- Topics in American Studies
    Topics in American Studies. Critically examines American identity and experiences, past and present, focusing on ethnicity, gender, popular culture, and political culture. Formerly AMST 2060.

  • ETHN 2242 -- African American Social and Political Thought
    African American Social and Political Thought. Introductory course designed to acquaint students with historical and contemporary thinking, writings, and speeches of African Americans. Formerly BLST 2210. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity or contemporary societies.

  • ETHN 2432 -- African American History
    African American History. Surveys African American history. Studies, interprets and analyzes major problems, issues, and trends affecting African Americans from about 1600 to the present. Same as HIST 2437. Formerly BLST 2437. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity or United States context.

  • ETHN 2536 -- Survey of Chicana/o History and Culture
    Survey of Chicana/o History and Culture. Through historical and social scientific studies, novels, autobiographies, testimonies, films, music, and art, this course will provide students a survey of Chicana/o history and culture. Historical overviews of Chicana/o peoples from Mesoamerica; the Spanish Conquest; the historical presence of Chicana/o peoples in the Southwest; the rise of the Chicana/o student and community movements; immigration issues; and the gender, sexuality, and criminalization issues. Formerly CHST 2537. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity or United States context.

  • ETHN 2703 -- American Indian Religious Traditions
    American Indian Religious Traditions. Introduces religions of the peoples indigenous to the Americas. Concerns include ritual, mythology, and symbolism occurring throughout these cultures in such areas as art, architecture, cosmology, shamanism, sustenance modes, trade, and history. Same as RLST 2700. Formerly AIST 2700. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values or human diversity.

  • ETHN 3015 -- Asian Pacific American Communities
    Asian Pacific American Communities. Covers the concepts, methods, and theories commonly used in community research, as well as substantive information on selected Asian/Pacific American communities. Emphasizes the ethical/political dimensions of community studies. Prereq., ETHN 2001 or 1025. Formerly AAST 3013. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context or contemporary societies.

  • ETHN 3026 -- Women of Color: Chicanas in U.S. Society
    Women of Color: Chicanas in U.S. Society. Critically explores the Chicana experience and identity. Examines issues arising from the intersection of class, race, and gender. Focuses on controversies surrounding culture and gender through an analysis of feminism and feminismo. Prereq., ETHN 2001 or 2536 or equivalent. Formerly CHST 3026.

  • ETHN 3201 (3) -- Multicultural Leadership: Theories, Principles and Practices
    Multicultural Leadership: Theories, Principles and Practices. Focuses on leadership theories and skills necessary for effectiveness in multicultural settings. Students gain understanding of traditional and culturally diverse approaches to leadership and change through comparative analyses of western and Non-Western theories and practices. Community service required. Prereq., ETHN 2001 or equivalent. Formerly ETHN 3200. Same as INVS 3100 and LDSP 3100. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ETHN 4006 -- Chicana/Chicano Native American Cultures of the U.S.
    Chicana/Chicano Native American Cultures of the U.S. Theoretically engaged seminar considers intersections of Chicana/o and Native American studies to shape our scholarly understanding of the U.S. and Mexico borderlands. Ethnographies, historical studies, novels, film, and music will be used to understand the processes of Spanish and EuroAmerican colonization, neocolonialism, identity formation, gender, syncretism, and mestizaje. Prereq., ETHN 2001 or 2536 or equivalent. Formerly CHST 400.

  • ETHN 4252 -- African American Urban History
    African American Urban History. Fosters a better understanding and appreciation of the role African Americans have played in the evolution and shaping of urban America. Employs techniques of urban studies to more effectively assess the many dimensions, subtitles, and insensitivities of life in the city. Prereq., ETHN 2001 or 2002 or equivalent. Recommended prereq., a working knowledge of U.S. and AfroAmerican history. Restricted to juniors/seniors. Formerly BLST 4250.

  • ETHN 4306 -- The Chicana and Chicano and U
    The Chicana and Chicano and U.S. Social Systems. Gives special attention to ways U.S. institutions (i.e., legal, economic, educational, governmental and social agencies) affect Chicanas and Chicanos. Discusses internal colonialism, institutional racism, assimilation and acculturation, and identity. Prereq., ETHN 2536 or equivalent. ETHN 4306 and 5306 are indentical courses. Formerly CHST 4303.

  • ETHN 4521 -- Applied Cultural Anthropology
    Applied Cultural Anthropology. Analyzes problems of cultural change due to contacts between people of different cultures. Restricted to senior ANTH or ETHN majors. Same as ANTH 4510. Formerly ETHN 4520.

  • FRSI 1011 -- Introduction to Persian Civilization
    Introduction to Persian Civilization. An introduction to the history, literature and art of Iranian (Persian) civilization with a focus on the social and cultural aspects of contemporary Iran. Taught in English.

  • GEOG 1992 -- Human Geographies
    Human Geographies. Examines social, political, economic, and cultural processes creating the geographical worlds in which we live, and how these spatial relationships shape our everyday lives. Studies urban growth, geopolitics, agricultural development and change, economic growth and decline, population dynamics, and migration exploring both how these processes work at global scale as well as shape geographies of particular places. Meets MAPS requirement for social science: geography.

  • GEOG 2002 -- Geographies of Global Change
    Geographies of Global Change. Familiarizes students with spatial and ecological perspectives on economic, political, social, cultural, and environmental changes. Examines roles of transnational corporations, global media, world cities, food security, labor, migration, human rights, ethnicity, nationalism, resources, environmental degradation, and sustainable development in global change. Meets MAPS requirement for social science: geography.

  • GEOG 2412 -- Environment and Culture
    Environment and Culture. Examines natureculture interactions and the effects of development and resource use on environmental quality, as well as practical efforts to manage and protect the environment. Meets MAPS requirement for social science: geography.

  • GEOG 3742 -- Place, Power, and Contemporary Culture
    Place, Power, and Contemporary Culture. Presents a radical reexamination of the geography of culture. Examines the relationship between places, power, and the dynamics of culture. Explores how the globalization of economics, politics, and culture shapes local cultural change. Looks at how placebased cultural politics both assist and resist processes of globalization. Recommended prereq., GEOG 1982, 1992, or 2002. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • GEOG 4292 -- Migration, Immigrant Adaptation, and Development
    Migration, Immigrant Adaptation, and Development. Examines historical and current patterns of migration with an emphasis in international movement. Looks at leading migration theories related to both origin- and destinationbased explanations while critically looking at the role of development as a potential cause and consequence of population movement. Finally, covers some aspects of immigrants’ social and economic adaptation to their host society. Recommended prereqs., GEOG 1982, 1992, 2002, or 2412. Same as GEOG 5292 and ECON 4292.

  • GEOG 4742 -- Environments and Peoples
    Environments and Peoples. Studies the interaction of people and the environment, including human adaptation and modification of environments, cultural interpretation and construction of landscapes, and natural resources and land management. May be taken twice. Topics vary. Recommended prereqs., GEOG 1982, 1992, 2002 or 2412. Restricted to juniors/seniors.

  • GSLL 1108 -- Introduction to Jewish History
    Introduction to Jewish History. Surveys Jewish history from the earliest times to the present. Includes biblical history; Judaism in late antiquity, medieval, and early modern times; and special emphasis on the 19th century to the present, including American Judaism, the Holocaust, antiSemitism, Zionism, and Israel. Taught in English. Same as HIST 1108 and JWST 1108. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

  • HIST 1308 -- Introduction to Middle Eastern History
    Introduction to Middle Eastern History. Interdisciplinary course that focuses on medieval and modern history of the Middle East (A.D. 600 to the present). Introduces the Islamic civilization of the Middle East and the historical evolution of the region from the traditional into the modern eras. Covers social patterns, economic life, and intellectual trends, as well as political development. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

  • HIST 1408 -- Introduction to South Asian History
    Introduction to South Asian History. Introduction to South Asian History is a survey of the history of the South Asian subcontinent from prehistoric times to the present. Lectures and readings deal with political, economic, social, and intellectual history. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

  • HIST 1608 -- Introduction to Chinese History
    Introduction to Chinese History. Introduces students to Chinese civilization and to its historical evolution, from Neolithic period to present. Focuses on social patterns, economic structure, intellectual trends, and political developments. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

  • HIST 1708 -- Introduction to Japanese History
    Introduction to Japanese History. A broad interdisciplinary survey of the history of Japan from earliest times to the 20th century. Explores the development of political institutions, social structures, cultural and religious life, economic development, and foreign relations in an historical perspective. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

  • HIST 1800 -- Introduction to Global History
    Introduction to Global History. Applies a broad perspective to the global past in order to illuminate how common historical patterns and processes as well as unique elements shaped the human experience. Using a thematic approach, this introductory course highlights crosscultural interactions among societies, and, when relevant, how historical processes that began centuries ago still impact the contemporary world. Topic will vary by semester. Restricted to HIST BA and HIST Additional majors only.

  • HIST 2002 -- Introduction to Central and East European Studies
    Introduction to Central and East European Studies. Examines major themes in the history of Russia and EastCentral Europe since the early modern era, introduces the literature and arts of the region, and presents current political, social, and economic issues. Same as CEES 2002. Approved for arts and sciences core requirement: historical context.

  • HIST 4258 -- Africa under European Colonial Rule
    Africa under European Colonial Rule. Focuses on the political, economic, and social dimensions of colonialism, as well as African nationalism and decolonization. Prereq., HIST 1208. Restricted to sophomores/juniors/seniors.

  • HIST 4546 -- Popular Culture in the Modern United States
    Popular Culture in the Modern United States. Traces the history of cultural expression in the United States since the late nineteenth century. From art, fiction, and music to the movies, amusement parks, shopping, and sports, popular culture offers clues to decipher shifting patterns of consumption, globalization, race, gender, politics, technology, and media. Includes instruction and practice interpreting cultural materials in historical context. Prereq., HIST 1025. Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

  • HONR 2251 -- Introduction to the Bible
    Introduction to the Bible. Studies the major works, figures, and genres of the Bible and attempts to understand what they meant to their own time and why they became so important to Western civilization and contemporary America. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical content.

  • HUEN 2010 -- Tradition and Identity
    Tradition and Identity. Explores the place and possibility of personal identity both within and against the influence of tradition, including family, culture, language, and social, political and economic institutions. Via literature and film, wrestles with the nature of freedom, selfdetermination, and belonging.

  • HUMN 2100 -- Arts, Culture, and Media
    Arts, Culture, and Media. Promotes a better understanding of fundamental aesthetic and cultural issues by exploring competing definitions of art and culture. Sharpens critical and analytical abilities by asking students to read and compare different theories about arts, culture, media, and identity, and then to apply and assess those theories in relation to a selection of visual and verbal texts from a range of cultural and linguistic traditions. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

  • INVS 3100 (3) -- Multicultural Leadership: Theories, Principles and Practices
    Multicultural Leadership: Theories, Principles and Practices. Focuses on leadership theories and skills necessary for effectiveness in multicultural settings. Students gain understanding of traditional and culturally diverse approaches to leadership and change through comparative analyses of Western and Non-Western theories and practices. Community service required. Same as ETHN 3201 and LDSP 3100. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • JWST 2600 -- Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
    Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Introduces literature, beliefs, practices, and institutions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, in historical perspective. Same as RLST 2600. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • JWST 3312 -- The Bible as Literature
    The Bible as Literature. Surveys literary achievements of the JudeoChristian tradition as represented by the Bible. Restricted to sophomores/juniors/seniors. Same as ENGL 3312.

  • LGBT 3796 -- Queer Theory
    Queer Theory. Surveys theoretical, critical, and historical writings in the context of lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and gay literature. Examines relationships among aesthetic, cultural, and political agendas, and literary and visual texts of the 20th century. Prereq., sophomore standing. Same as ENGL 3796.

  • MUSC 2772 -- World Musics
    World Musics. Study of music outside western art tradition, using current ethnomusicological materials and methodologies. Spring semester focuses on musical cultures of Africa, the Americas, and Europe; fall semester focuses on musical cultures of Asia and Oceana.

  • MUSC 4012 -- African Music
    African Music. Studies the musics, dances, and cultures of various peoples of Africa. Includes African diaspora music and Afropop. Offered fall only.

  • MUSC 4112 -- Ethnomusicology
    Ethnomusicology. Examines the definition, scope, and methods of ethnomusicology, the discipline that focuses on approaches to the study of music theory, history, and performance practices of world cultures. Prereq., MUSC 2772. Restricted to juniors/seniors.

  • MUSC 4142 -- American Indian Music
    American Indian Music. Examines Native North American musical cultures, with an emphasis on music as an integral part of religious expression and community life. Restricted to juniors/seniors.

  • MUSC 4892 -- Latin American Music
    Latin American Music. Explores music of cultures south of the United States, emphasizing the relationships of music and culture in folk, popular, and art styles. Restricted to juniors/seniors Music majors only. Same as MUSC 5892.

  • PHIL 1200 -- Philosophy and Society
    Philosophy and Society. Introduces philosophical thought through critical analysis of our own society, its institutions, and principles. Meets MAPS requirement for social science: general. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context or ideals and values.

  • PSYC 2456 -- Social Psychology of Social Problems
    Social Psychology of Social Problems. Examines social psychological aspects of a variety of issues, ranging from problems of poverty or minority status to topics such as prejudice, drug use, student protest, and patterns of sexual behavior.

  • PSYC 2606 -- Social Psychology
    Social Psychology. Covers general psychological principles underlying social behavior. Analyzes major social psychological theories, methods, and topics, including attitudes,conformity, aggression, attraction, social perception, helping behavior, and group relations. Prereq., PSYC 1001. Credit not granted for this course and PSYC 4406. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • RLST 1620 -- Religious Dimension in Human Experience
    Religious Dimension in Human Experience. Studies religion as individual experience and social phenomenon. Examines varieties of religious language (symbol, myth, ritual, scripture) and of religious experience (Asian, Western, archaic). Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • RLST 2400 -- Religion and Contemporary Society
    Religion and Contemporary Society. Studies the nature of contemporary American society from various theoretical perspectives in religious studies. Gives attention to the impact of secularization and to the religious elements found in aspects of secular life (e.g., politics, literature, education, and recreation). Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • RLST 2500 -- Religions in the United States
    Religions in the United States. Explores the development of various religions within the shaping influences of American culture, including separation of church and state, the frontier experience, civil religion, and the interaction of religions of indigenous peoples, immigrants, and African Americans. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context or ideals and values.

  • RLST 2600 -- Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
    Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Introduces literature, beliefs, practices, and institutions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, in historical perspective. Same as JWST 2600. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • RLST 2610 -- Religions of South Asia
    Religions of South Asia. Introduces the literature, beliefs, practices, and institutions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism, in historical perspective. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • RLST 2620 -- Religions of East Asia
    Religions of East Asia. Introduces literature, beliefs, practices, and institutions of Daoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, and Shintoism in historical perspective. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • RLST 2700 -- American Indian Religious Traditions
    American Indian Religious Traditions. Introduces religions of the peoples indigenous to the Americas. Concerns include ritual, mythology, and symbolism occurring throughout these cultures in such areas as art, architecture, cosmology, shamanism, sustenance modes, trade, and history. Same as ETHN 2703. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values or human diversity.

  • RLST 3100 -- Judaism
    Judaism. Explores Jewish religious experience and its expression in thought, ritual, ethics, and social institutions. Same as JWST 3100. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

  • RLST 3200 -- Hinduism
    Hinduism. Studies literature, beliefs, practices, and institutions of Hinduism, in historical perspective.

  • RLST 3300 -- Foundations of Buddhism
    Foundations of Buddhism. Introduction to Buddhist thought and practice in the variety of its historical and cultural contexts. The course begins with an exploration of narrative, cosmology, doctrine and ritual in early Buddhism and the Theravada of South and Southeast Asia. Through case studies, we then trace diverse conceptions of the Buddhist path in Tibet and East Asia where the Mahayana spread. Restricted to sophomores, juniors and seniors.

  • RLST 3400 -- Japanese Religions
    Japanese Religions. Studies the literature, beliefs, practices, and institutions of Shinto, Buddhism, and Confucianism within the development of Japanese culture.

  • RLST 3600 -- Islam
    Islam. Introduces Islamic beliefs and practices through an examination of the Qur’an, Muhammad’s life, ritual duties, law and theology, mysticism, and social institutions.

  • RLST 3800 -- Chinese Religions
    Chinese Religions. Studies classical Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and NeoConfucianism within the historical context of Chinese culture.

  • RLST 4030 -- Religions in America
    Religions in America. Studies various religious movements in the U.S. and other parts of the Americas. Includes American religion and religions, religion and nationalism, revitalization and religion, and Asian religions in America. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours within a term as topics change. Prereq., 6 hours RLST or instructor consent. Same as RLST 5030.

  • RLST 4650 -- Islam in the Modern World
    Islam in the Modern World. Globally surveys Islam, covering religion and politics; Islam and the West; the Islamic revival and its varied forms in Iran, Indonesia, Libya, and Pakistan; development and change; the status of women; and media and academic stereotyping. Prereq., 6 credit hours of religious studies at any level or instructor consent. Same as RLST 5650.

  • RLST 4800 -- Critical Studies in Religion
    Critical Studies in Religion. Focuses on a current issue or area of research in the study of religion. Students analyze the way theories develop and learn to develop their own critical analysis. Topics vary, e.g., comparative kingship, colonialism, ritual theories, feminist analysis. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Restricted to RLST majors.

  • SOCY 4121 -- Sociology of Religion
    Sociology of Religion. Examines complex interactions between religious and other social structures, such as the economy, government, and the family, and how globalization is affecting religious traditions across the globe. Includes discussion of how various religions are used or misused to justify terrorism and other acts of violence. Prereqs., SOCY 1001, and SOCY 3001 or 3011. Restricted to junior/senior SOCY majors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • WMST 3210 -- American Indian Women
    American Indian Women. Explores the experiences, perspectives, and status of American Indian women in historical and contemporary contexts. Examines representations of indigenous women in mainstream culture. Emphasizes the agency of American Indian womentheir persistence, creativity, and activism, especially in maintaining indigenous traditions. Prereq., WMST 2000, 2600 or ETHN 2001 or 2003. Restricted to sophomores/juniors/seniors. Same as ETHN 3213. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • WMST 3220 -- Women in Islam
    Women in Islam. Examines the historical and contemporary relation between women, gender, and Islamic cultures in different parts of the world. We will consider the role and rights of women in Islam, historical and literary representations of Muslim women, and the historically changing constructions of gender and sexuality in Muslim societies. In addition, we will critically explore the construction of Muslim women in western discourses, including liberal feminist discourse, and ask whether the representation of Muslim women in these discourses achieves or undermines ends that we might consider "feminist." In attending to the wide range of Muslim women’s lived experiences in Islamic communities and cultures, as well as the selfrepresentations of Muslim women themselves, our readings will urge U.S. to reexamine our presumptions about piety, secularism, modernity and feminism. Prereq., WMST 2000, 2050, or 2600.

  • WMST 3400 -- Gender, Personality, and Culture
    Gender, Personality, and Culture. Explores the relationship among gender, culture, and personality. Brings together the disciplines of psychology and sociology in the study of gender and personality formation through investigation of psychoanalytic theory and the social environment. Prereqs., WMST 2000 or 2700, and junior or senior standing.

  • HIST 2100 -- Revolution in History
    Revolution in History. Examines the causes, character, and significance of political revolution in world history. Concentrating on one of the major revolutions of modern history, it examines why revolutions occur, who participates in revolution, and to what effect. Specific course focus varies. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

  • HIST 2220 -- History of War and Society
    History of War and Society. Focuses on war and society in a variety of global contexts. Explores the character, origins, and social, political, and intellectual impacts of war in contexts ranging from several centuries of international conflict to the experience of individual nations in specific wars. Topic varies in any given semester; contact Department of History for details. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: historical context.

  • HIST 4146 -- Military History
    Military History. Examines America’s national defense and war efforts from the Spanish American War to the present, emphasizing causes and consequences of modern conflicts, and the impact of military activities on American society. Restricted to juniors/seniors.

  • IAFS 4500 -- The Post–Cold War World
    The Post–Cold War World. Capstone course for international affairs majors. Examines the ways in which the end of the Cold War, the collapse of failed states, and the rise of global terrorism changed the world. Studies how peoples, governments and nongovernmental organizations face new social, political, economic and security challenges in an era of globalization. Includes discussion, oral reports, critical book reviews, and research papers. Restricted to junior/senior IAFS majors.

  • AIRR 2010 -- The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power 1
    The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power 1. One 1-hour lecture and one 2-hour lab per week. Studies air power from balloons and dirigibles through the jet age and historically reviews air power employment in military and nonmilitary operations in support of national objectives. Looks at the evolution of air power concepts and doctrine and introduces the development of communicative skills.

  • AIRR 2020 -- The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power 2
    The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power 2. A continuation of AIRR 2010. One 1-hour lecture and one 2-hour lab per week.

  • NAVR 3101 -- Evolution of Warfare
    Evolution of Warfare. Traces the development of warfare, focusing on the impact of military theorists and technical developments. Assists students to acquire a sense of strategy, develop an understanding of military alternatives, and see the impact of historical precedent on military actions.

  • PSCI 4122 -- The Military in Politics: Latin America and the U.S.
    The Military in Politics: Latin America and the U.S. Analyzes the causes and consequences of military intervention in politics, contrasting patterns of civilmilitary relations, and the problem of democratic control of the armed forces. Focuses on the Latin American military, with secondary attention to U.S. military. Prereq., PSCI 2012 or IAFS 1000, and PSCI or ROTC major. 

  • ARSC 2000 -- Ways of Knowing: Constructions of Knowledge in the Academy and Beyond
    Ways of Knowing: Constructions of Knowledge in the Academy and Beyond. Explores different ways of knowing from interdisciplinary, crosscultural perspectives. Course begins with personal interrogations of students’ primary learning modes. It goes on to examine cultural assumptions about schooling, learning and knowledge, juxtaposing western and eastern philosophies of knowing and looking at how gender, race, class, and other categories of identity shape and interpret concepts of knowledge. Same as NRLN 2000. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • ENVS 1000 -- Introduction to Environmental Studies
    Introduction to Environmental Studies. Surveys environmental studies, examining ecological, socioeconomic, political, aesthetic, and technological factors that influence the quality of life on Earth. Required for ENVS majors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • ENVS 2100 -- Topics in Applied Environmental Studies
    Topics in Applied Environmental Studies. Covers a variety of topics not currently offered in the curriculum: offered depending on instructor availability and student demand. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours, provided the topics vary. Prereq., ENVS 1000.

  • PSYC 4376 -- Research Methods in Social Psychology
    Research Methods in Social Psychology. Designed primarily for psychology majors interested in learning about research methodology. Topics include research design, data collection and data analysis,and written research reports. Prereqs., PSYC 1001, 2606, and 3101.

  • WRTG 3030 -- Writing on Science and Society
    Writing on Science and Society. Through selected reading and writing assignments, students consider ethical and social ramifications of science policy and practice. Focuses on critical thinking, analytical writing, and oral presentation. Taught as a writing workshop, the course addresses communication with professional and nontechnical audiences. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Restricted to junior and senior engineering/physical and biological science majors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: written communication.

  • WRTG 3040 -- Writing on Business and Society
    Writing on Business and Society. Through selected reading and writing assignments, students examine ethical and social issues in the context of business decisionmaking processes. Focuses on critical thinking, analytical writing, and oral presentation. Taught as a writing workshop, the course emphasizes effective communication with professional and nontechnical audiences. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Restricted to junior and senior business/economics IAFS majors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: written communication. 

  • GEEN 1510 -- Self Management and Leadership Principles 1
    Self Management and Leadership Principles 1. Develops group cohesiveness, mutual support, multicultural awareness, and leadership skills. Topics include collaborative learning, motivation, time management and study skills, personal assertiveness, and career awareness. Open to new freshmen and transfer students. Controlled enrollment. Fulfills 1 credit hour of the engineering social science requirement.

  • PSYC 4136 -- Judgment and Decision Making
    Judgment and Decision Making. One lab, three lectures per week. Introduces the study of judgment and decision making processes (estimation, prediction and diagnosis, choice under certainty, and risky decision making) and the methods that have been developed to improve these processes (statistical modeling, decision analysis, and expert systems). Prereqs., PSYC 1001, 2606, and 3101. 

  • ECON 3784 -- Economic Development and Policy
    Economic Development and Policy. Introductory course in Economic Development, designed for nonmajors. Students are introduced to the major issues in development economics. Students will explore empirical, theoretical, and policy issues in economic development. Emphasis is placed on the controversial issues in this literature, requiring students to explore competing, and often conflicting, perspectives of these issues. Prereqs., ECON 1000 or ECON 2010 and 2020. Restricted to nonmajors.

  • ECON 4221 -- Political and Public Choice Economics
    Political and Public Choice Economics. Explores decisionmaking in nontraditional market settings, specifically political market settings, using economic models. We investigate policy outcomes as the product of interactions among individuals in political markets, and analyze how governmental decisions are the result of rational optimizing behavior, even if they do not lead to policies that maximize national welfare. Prereqs., ECON 3070 and 3818.

  • ENVS 5000 -- Policy, Science, and the Environment
    Policy, Science, and the Environment. Introduction to methodologies of the policy sciences with emphasis on applications to environmental issues; role of science in decision making; professional roles and responsibilities as a policy analyst.

  • PSCI 2106 -- Introduction to Public Policy Analysis
    Introduction to Public Policy Analysis. Studies policymaking processes in American government, factors shaping public decision, and issues and questions relevant to political inquiry.

  • PSCI 3143 -- Problems in International Relations
    Problems in International Relations. Analyzes the various theoretical and policy challenges facing the postCold War world, with an emphasis on examining alternative conceptions of and approaches to such challenges. Pre-req., PSCI 2223. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • PSCI 3193 -- International Behavior
    International Behavior. Presents alternate theoretical frameworks for the explanation of international processes. Applies theories of conflict behavior and social organization to problems of war and peace. Prereq., PSCI 2223. 

  • BADM 4010 -- Sustainable Resort Tourism
    Sustainable Resort Tourism. Focuses on resort communities in the Western U.S. and Canada and the challenges they face in planning, development, management and sustainability. Course topics include, but may not be limited to, business development factors for tourism and nontourism businesses.

  • BAKR 1600 -- Creating a Sustainable Future
    Creating a Sustainable Future. Explores opportunities for moving toward a sustainable 21st century U.S. society. Evaluates socioeconomic institutions, values and forces in late 20th century U.S. society that are unsustainable, given 21st century environmental, economic and social challenges. Contemplates societal progress from reflective perspectives and leading visionaries, including CUgenerated documents. Explores actions you can adopt now that empower you to live a more sustainable lifestyle. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • ENVS 3070 -- Energy and the Environment
    Energy and the Environment. Examines contemporary issues in energy consumption and its environmental impact, including fossil fuel use and depletion; nuclear energy and waste disposal; solar, wind, hydroelectric, and other renewable sources; home heating; energy storage; fuel cells; and alternative transportation vehicles. Includes some basic physical concepts and principles that often constrain choices. No background in physics is required. Same as PHYS 3070. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • ENVS 3140 -- Environmental Ethics
    Environmental Ethics. Examines major traditions in moral philosophy to see what light they shed on value issues in environmental policy and the value presuppositions of the economic, ecological, and juridical approaches to the environment. Prereq., sophomore standing or PHIL 1100, 1200, 2200, 3100, or 3200. Same as PHIL 3140. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • ENVS 3621 -- Energy Policy and Society
    Energy Policy and Society. Examines how society makes decisions about energy, and how these decisions affect the environment and the economy. Uses tools from policy analysis, economics, and other disciplines to build an indepth understanding of energy’s role in U.S. contemporary society. Recommended prereqs., ENVS/PHYS 3070.

  • ENVS 4800 -- Critical Thinking in Environmental Studies
    Critical Thinking in Environmental Studies. Examines a specific environmental topic in depth, synthesizing information from complex and controversial issues. Different course sections present different topics. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Restricted to students with junior or senior status in environmental studies.

  • GEOL 4080 -- Societal Problems and Earth Sciences
    Societal Problems and Earth Sciences. Analyzes contemporary societal problems involving geoscience. One class period per week is generally devoted to lecture. During class discussions the professor acts as scientific advisor while students debate material they have researched. Prereqs., one year of calculus and one year of natural science (physics, chemistry, biology) or equivalent, or instructor consent. 

  • PHIL 2140 -- Environmental Justice
    Environmental Justice. Traditional and contemporary theories of justice are employed in order to critically analyze social and political issues that have important environmental dimensions. Assesses the relationship of justice and equity to the presuppositions of national and global environmental issues and policies.

  • ATOC 1050 -- Weather and the Atmosphere
    Weather and the Atmosphere. Introduces principles of modern meteorology for nonscience majors, with emphasis on scientific and human issues associated with severe weather events. Includes description, methods of prediction, and impacts of blizzards, hurricanes, thunderstorms, tornadoes, lightning, floods, and firestorms. Meets MAPS requirement for natural science: nonlab. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • ATOC 1060 -- Our Changing Environment: El Niño, Ozone, and Climate
    Our Changing Environment: El Niño, Ozone, and Climate. Discusses the Earth’s climate for nonscience majors, focusing on the role of the atmosphere, oceans, and land surface. Describes the water cycle, atmospheric circulations, and ocean currents, and how they influence global climate, El Niño, and the ozone hole. Discusses human impacts from climate change. Prereq., ATOC 1050. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • ATOC 3300 -- Analysis of Climate and Weather Observations
    Analysis of Climate and Weather Observations. Discusses instruments, techniques, and statistical methods used in atmospheric observations. Covers issues of data accuracy and analysis of weather maps. Provides application to temperature and precipitation records, weather forecasting, and climate change trends. Uses computers to access data sets and process data. Prereqs., ATOC 1050 and 1060, or ATOC 3600/GEOG 3601/ENVS 3600, or GEOG 1001 and one semester of calculus. Same as GEOG 3301. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • CHEM 1011 -- Environmental Chemistry 1
    Environmental Chemistry 1. Lect. Introduces basic principles of chemistry with applications to current environmental issues including toxic chemicals, air and water pollution, energy sources and their environmental impact, and climate change resulting from the greenhouse effect. No credit given to chemistry or biochemistry majors for CHEM 1011 if students already have credit in any collegelevel chemistry course numbered 1113/1114 (formerly 1111) or higher. Meets MAPS requirements for natural sciences: chemistry or physics. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • CHEM 1031 -- Environmental Chemistry 2
    Environmental Chemistry 2. Lect., rec., and lab. Applications of chemical principles to current environmental issues including acid rain, stratospheric ozone depletion, the Antarctic ozone hole, solar energy conversion and fuel cells, and the environmental consequences of nuclear war. Laboratory experience is included. No credit given to chemistry or biochemistry majors for 1031 if students already have credit in any collegelevel chemistry course numbered 1113/1114 (formerly 1111) or higher. Prereq., CHEM 1011 with a grade of C- or higher. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • CHEM 3151 -- Air Chemistry and Pollution
    Air Chemistry and Pollution. Examines the composition of the atmosphere, and sources of gaseous and particulate pollutants: their chemistry, transport, and removal from the atmosphere. Applies general principles to acid rain, smog, and stratospheric ozone depletion. Prereqs., two semesters of chemistry. Same as ATOC 3500.

  • CHEN 1000 -- Creative Technology
    Creative Technology. Lect. Introduces undergraduate arts and sciences students to the most recent concepts in technology and how these concepts impact all aspects of life, such as health, the health of the planet, and social structures. Engineering students should consult an advisor before registering for this course. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • CVEN 3424 -- Water and Wastewater Treatment
    Water and Wastewater Treatment. Introduces design and operation of facilities for treatment of municipal water supplies and wastewater. Provides an engineering application of physical, chemical, and biological unit processes and operations for removal of impurities and pollutants. Involves an integrated design of whole treatment systems combining process elements. Prereq., CVEN 3414.

  • CVEN 3434 -- Introduction to Applied Ecology
    Introduction to Applied Ecology. Emphasizes the integration of physical, chemical, and biological processes in controlling terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Ecosystem concepts are applied to current environmental and water quality problems. Includes field trips and a group project. Prereq., CHEM 1111 or CHEN 1211 and 1221. Restricted to junior/senior CVEN, EVEN, or AREN majors. Same as ENVS 3434.

  • CVEN 4323 -- Water Resource Engineering Design
    Water Resource Engineering Design. Design of urban water supply, wastewater, and supply stormwater management system, with demand management as an option. Exploration of the feasibility of recycling and reuse of treated wastewater and stormwater. Prereqs., CVEN 3227 and 4147. Same as CVEN 5423.

  • CVEN 4474 -- Hazardous and Industrial Waste Management
    Hazardous and Industrial Waste Management. Evaluates processes used for treatment of wastes requiring special handling and disposal: toxic organic chemicals, heavy metals, and acidic, caustic, and radioactive waste material. Discusses techniques for destruction, immobilization, and resource recovery and assessment of environmental impact of treatment process end products. Prereq., CVEN 3414. Same as CVEN 5474.

  • CVEN 4700 -- Sustainability and the Built Environment
    Sustainability and the Built Environment. Introduces fundamental concepts of sustainability and sustainable development. Special emphasis on understanding the interaction of the built environment with natural systems and the role of technical and nontechnical issues in engineering decisions. Open to engineering and nonengineering students. Same as CVEN 5700.

  • EBIO 2590 -- Plants and Society
    Plants and Society. Acquaints students with the plants that are both essential and desirable to human survival, wellbeing, and quality of life. Topics include plants and world cultures, food plants, commercial products (beverages, extracts, herbs, and spices, etc.), cosmetics, textiles, wood products, medicinal plants, psychoactive plants, poisonous plants, plants used in horticulture and landscape architecture, wood products, musical instruments, etc.

  • EBIO 3040 -- Conservation Biology
    Conservation Biology. Applies principles of population ecology, population genetics, biogeography, animal behavior, and paleobiology to the maintenance of biodiversity and natural systems. The resulting theory is then applied to conservation policy and management techniques. Prereq., EBIO 2040 or 2640. Same as ENVS 3040.

  • EBIO 3110 -- Population and Community Ecology
    Population and Community Ecology. Presents principles of ecology that relate to the niche, population growth, metapopulations, population interactions (within and between trophic levels), community structure and development, landscape ecology and species diversity. Prereq.,

  • EBIO 3180 -- Global Ecology
    Global Ecology. Lect. Involves study of ecological principles and problems at the biosphere level. Presents a worldwide approach to populations, biotic resources, ecologic interactions, land use, deforestation, desertification, species extinctions, pollution, environmental quality, global change, and environmental ethics. Prereqs., EBIO 1210 and 1220 or equivalent. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • EBIO 4180 -- Ecological Perspectives on Global Change
    Ecological Perspectives on Global Change. Discusses evolutionary and recent geological history of modern environmental problems, using natural changes in climate, biotic diversity, drought, desertification, flood, forest destruction, etc., to show the range and frequency of such events as a perspective on modern reports. Prereq., minimum 14 hours of EBIO course work, including EBIO 2040, EPOB 2050 or 3020.

  • ECEN 1500 -- Sustainable Energy
    Sustainable Energy. Explores how energy is created and used in today’s society. Through collaborative discussion and handson data collection, students will analyze the engineering challenges, fundamental limits, and potential solutions to meeting our energy needs sustainably. Students will learn to analyze numerical data, estimate orders, of magnitude, and apply mathematical methods in their own lives and in the ongoing energy debate. Basic algebra required. Restricted to nonengineering majors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: quantitative reasoning and mathematical skills.

  • ENVS 3434 -- Introduction to Applied Ecology
    Introduction to Applied Ecology. Emphasizes the integration of physical, chemical, and biological processes in controlling terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Ecosystem concepts are applied to current environmental and water quality problems. Includes field trips and a group project. Prereq., CHEM 1111 or CHEN 1211 and 1221. Same as CVEN 3434.

  • ENVS 3520 -- Environmental Issues in Geosciences
    Environmental Issues in Geosciences. Addresses current environmental problems that need an understanding of geology. Topics include energy resources, climate modification, hydrology, waste disposal, and mining resources. Uses specific examples to illustrate restrictions imposed by nature and man on solutions to these problems. Prereq., a twocourse sequence in any natural science. Same as GEOL 3520. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • ENVS 3600 -- Principles of Climate
    Principles of Climate. Describes the basic components of the climate system: the atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, and lithosphere. Investigates the basic physical processes that determine climate and link the components of the climate system, including the hydrological cycle and its role in climate, climate stability, and global change. Covers forecasting climate, its applications, and human dimensions. Prereqs., ATOC 1050 and 1060, or ATOC 3300/GEOG 3301, or GEOG 1001 and 1 semester of calculus. Same as GEOG 3601 and ATOC 3600. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • GEOG 1001 -- Environmental Systems 1: Climate and Vegetation
    Environmental Systems 1: Climate and Vegetation. MLect. and lab. Introduces the atmospheric environment of the Earth: elements and controls of climate and their implications for hydrology, vegetation, and soils. Emphasizes distribution of physical features across the Earth’s surface and interactions between humans and their environment, especially those leading to global change on the decade to century time scale. Meets MAPS requirement for natural science: nonlab or lab. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • GEOG 1011 -- Environmental Systems 2: Landscapes and Water
    Environmental Systems 2: Landscapes and Water. MLect. and lab. Introduces landscapes and flowing water, emphasizing the formation and geographic distribution of mountains, volcanoes, valleys, and deserts, and their shaping by rivers and glaciers. Includes field trips. Meets MAPS requirement for natural science: nonlab or lab. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • GEOG 3601 -- Principles of Climate
    Principles of Climate. Describes the basic components of the climate system: the atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, and lithosphere. Investigates the basic physical processes that determine climate and link the components of the climate system, including the hydrological cycle and its role in climate, climate stability, and global change. Covers forecasting climate, its applications, and human dimensions. Prereqs., ATOC 1050 and 1060, or GEOG 3301/ATOC 3300, or GEOG 1001 and 1-semester calculus. Same as ATOC/ENVS 3600. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • GEOL 3130 -- Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast
    Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast. Uses the example of manmade climate change to develop an analytical understanding of the Earth system (solid, fluid, and living) that can be used to interpret the complex and uncertain forecast. Emphasis is given to the concepts of forcing, feedback and response in order to examine natural vs. manmade environmental changes and climate change mitigation strategies.

  • GEOL 3500 -- Earth Resources and the Environment
    Earth Resources and the Environment. Examines Earth’s most important natural resources and their impact on society and the environment. Addresses the geology, occurrence, production, and use of petroleum, coal, mineral, and water resources. Future world energy supply and demand, conservation, and the transition from fossil fuels to nonpolluting renewable resources are discussed. Prereq., GEOL 1010 or 1060. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • GEOL 3520 -- Environmental Issues in Geosciences
    Environmental Issues in Geosciences. Addresses current environmental problems in which an understanding of geology is needed. Topics include energy resources, climate modification, hydrology, waste disposal, and mining resources. Specific examples used to illustrate restrictions imposed by nature and man on solutions to these problems. Prereq., a twocourse sequence in any natural science. Same as ENVS 3520. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science.

  • PHYS 3070 -- Energy and the Environment
    Energy and the Environment. Contemporary issues in energy consumption and its environmental impact, including fossil fuel use and depletion; nuclear energy and waste disposal; solar, wind, hydroelectric, and other renewable sources; home heating; energy storage; fuel cells; and alternative transportation vehicles. Included are some basic physical concepts and principles that often constrain choices. No background in physics is required. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: natural science. Same as ENVS 3070. 

  • BCOR 3000 -- Business Law, Ethics, and Public Policy
    Business Law, Ethics, and Public Policy. Surveys major topics and case studies in business law, business ethics, and government policy. Business law topics include the American legal system, constitutional law, common law, contract principles, criminal and tort law, intellectual property, employment law, and personal and real property law. Ethics topics include the philosophy of law, legal versus moral issues, and professional responsibility. Public policy topics include the roles of business and government, types of government intervention, and the nature and theory of governmental policy formulation. Prereq., 52 hours completed.

  • BCOR 3010 -- Business Applications of Social Responsibility
    Business Applications of Social Responsibility. Explores alternative views of the role of business in our global society through detailed case analyses, beginning with the free market view. This is a crossfunctional area course that helps students to isolate and articulate their personal values that will shape business conduct. Emphasizes individual and organizational responsibility for business behavior in the broader social context. Prereq., BCOR 1010, 1020, 2000, 2200, 2300, 2400, 2500 and 59 hours completed.

  • ECON 4626 -- The Economics of Inequality and Discrimination
    The Economics of Inequality and Discrimination. Examines the unique insights available through economic analysis regarding the causes, mechanisms, and consequences of inequality and discrimination. Examines the extent of inequality, the varieties and extents of discrimination, and explores the economic models that suggest explanations. Prereq., ECON 3070. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • ECON 4774 -- Economic Reform in Developing Countries
    Economic Reform in Developing Countries. Explores competing paradigms of economic development, emphasizing the confrontation between the structuralist/dirigiste paradigm and the neoclassical public choice paradigm. Analyzes economic reforms under way in developing countries, including stabilization policy and structural adjustment. Also explores political reforms, including the pluralist revolution and the design of a constitutional framework in developing societies. Prereqs., ECON 3070 or 3080.

  • ENVS 4027 -- Inequality, Democracy, and the Environment
    Inequality, Democracy, and the Environment. Focuses on the structural forces affecting environmental degradation and environmental behavior by examining the relationships between (a) inequality and democratic decision making and (b) undemocratic decision making; U.S. and corporate food and energy policy; and global environmental degradation. The course also focuses on the role that global inequality plays in fostering environmental degradation. Restricted to juniors/seniors. Same as SOCY 4027.

  • FARR 1562 -- Gandhi’s Satyagraha: Love in Action for Humans and Other Creatures
    Gandhi’s Satyagraha: Love in Action for Humans and Other Creatures. Class texts and films explore social justice and structural violence in regard to humans, animals, and the environment in the light of a Gandhian approach to these issues. Outreach work in the community is included.

  • GEOG 3662 -- Economic Geography
    Economic Geography. Presents several theories of location of economic activity: general theory of land use, agricultural location theory, plant location theory, central place theory, location of systems of cities, and geographical organization of industries. Studies aggregate geographical structure of regions as the geography of three major markets: labor, product, and capital, including the banking system. Explores the economic growth of regions and policies designed to influence regional growth and welfare.

  • GEOG 3672 -- Gender and the Global Economy
    Gender and the Global Economy. Examines the role of gender in global economy. Explores the impacts of colonialism and modern global economy on gender relations, with particular emphasis on third world societies. Also focuses on related issues of population politics, environmental crisis, women’s sexual exploitation, and women’s social movements worldwide. Prereqs., GEOG 1982, 1992,2002, 2412, WMST 2000 or 2050. Same as WMST 3672. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • LDSP 2400 -- Understanding Privilege and Oppression in Contemporary SocietyLeadership
    Understanding Privilege and Oppression in Contemporary SocietyLeadership. Broadbased, multicultural, multidisciplinary course. Covers the interaction of privilege and oppression in the U.S., focusing on race, socioeconomic class, sexual orientation, and physical ability, as well as leadership skills needed to function in a multicultural, global society. Same as FARR 2400. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity or contemporary societies.

  • NAVR 4020 -- Leadership and Ethics
    Leadership and Ethics. Studies the ethics and laws of armed conflict, analyzing the leadership responsibilities of officers in conflict. Studies the military justice system and Naval legal administrative procedures, comparing military law with civilian criminal and civil law. Defines the responsibilities of junior officers within the military justice system.

  • PHIL 1100 -- Ethics
    Ethics. Introductory study of major philosophies on the nature of the good for humanity, principles of evaluation, and moral choice as they apply to contemporary moral problems. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • PHIL 3100 -- Ethical Theory
    Ethical Theory. Studies major issues and theories in ethics. Prereq., 6 hours of philosophy course work. Prereq. or coreq., PHIL 3480. Restricted to juniors/seniors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • PHIL 3140 -- Environmental Ethics
    Environmental Ethics. Examines major traditions in moral philosophy to see what light they shed on value issues in environmental policy and the value presuppositions of the economic, ecological, and juridical approaches to the environment. Prereq., sophomore standing or PHIL 1100, 1200, 2200, 3100, or 3200. Same as ENVS 3140. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • PHIL 3160 -- Bioethics
    Bioethics. Analysis of ethical problems involved in such issues as abortion, euthanasia, organ transplants, eugenics, treatment of the patient as a person, and the institutional nature of the health care delivery system. Prereq., 6 hours of philosophy course work. Restricted to sophomores/juniors/seniors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • PHIL 3190 (3) -- War and Morality
    War and Morality. Focuses on moral issues raised by war as a human institution. What are the justifications, limits, and alternatives? Does the advent of nuclear weapons change the nature of war? Prereq., 6 hours of philosophy course work. Restricted to sophomores,juniors and seniors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • PHIL 3200 -- Social and Political Philosophy
    Social and Political Philosophy. Systematic discussion and analysis of such philosophic ideas as community, freedom, political power, and violence. Prereq., 6 hours of philosophy course work. Restricted to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • PHIL 3260 -- Philosophy and the International Order
    Philosophy and the International Order. Considers philosophical topics concerning the international economic, political, and legal systems. Topics that may be considered include the nature of international law, war and peace, humanitarian intervention, international justice, world hunger, and human rights. Prereq., 6 hours PHIL course work. Restricted to sophomores/juniors/seniors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • PRLC 1810 -- Leadership and Ethics
    Leadership and Ethics. Introduces fundamental principles of leadership and ethics. Emphasizes application of the principles for selfdevelopment and organizational effectiveness. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • SEWL 2000 -- America, the Environment, and the Global Economy
    America, the Environment, and the Global Economy. Examines the debate over globalization and the global environmental crisis. Does increasing global economic development threaten to undermine the environment? What role should America play in the development of a sustainable economy? Credit not granted for this course and SOCY 1002. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • SOCY 2021 -- Nonviolence and the Ethics of Social Action
    Nonviolence and the Ethics of Social Action. Examines nonviolence as a strategy of social action. Focuses on ethics and dynamics of nonviolent action; racial and economic justice movements; civil disobedience; and conscientious objection to war.

  • SOCY 3034 -- Perspectives on Violence
    Perspectives on Violence. What counts as violence? Who decides what is violence and what is not? In what contexts does violence occur? This course critically examines different criminological and social science perspectives on violence. Prereq., SOCY 1001 or 1004.

  • SOCY 4027 -- Inequality, Democracy, and the Environment
    Inequality, Democracy, and the Environment. Focuses on the structural forces affecting environmental degradation and environmental behavior by examining the relationships between (a) inequality and democratic decision making and (b) undemocratic decision making; U.S. and corporate food and energy policy; and global environmental degradation. The course also focuses on the role that global inequality plays in fostering environmental degradation. Restricted to juniors/seniors. Same as ENVS 4027.

  • WMST 3730 -- Third World Women and the Politics of International Development
    Third World Women and the Politics of International Development. Examines the history, characteristics, problems, status and role of Third World women in development itself. Includes the interrelationships between development and population growth, transnational economics, migration, education, agriculture, health, urbanization, development policy and planning, and their impact on women and men in urban and rural areas in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia, and Melanesia. Prereq., WMST 2000 or 2600. Restricted to juniors/seniors. 

  • ANTH 4500 -- Cross-Cultural Aspects of Socioeconomic Development
    CrossCultural Aspects of Socioeconomic Development. Examines goals of international agencies that support development in underdeveloped countries. Anthropological perspective is provided for such issues as urban planning, health care and delivery, population control, rural development, and land reform. Same as ANTH 5500.

  • CESR 4820 -- Business Solutions to Global Poverty: Learning Through Service
    Business Solutions to Global Poverty: Learning Through Service. Provides students with practical knowledge and handson experience in developing sustainable business strategies to meet the realworld needs of small business entrepreneurs in developing countries. Students teams work with Peace Corps volunteers and other social entrepreneurs who are addressing social and environmental issues.

  • CVEN 3414 -- Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering
    Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering. Emphasizes chemical, ecological, and hydrological fundamentals and importance of mass and energy balances in solving environmental engineering problems related to water quality, water and wastewater treatment, air pollution, solid and hazardous waste management, sustainability, and risk assessment. Prereqs., CHEN 1211 and APPM 1360.

  • ENVD 2001 -- Human Behavior in Design and Planning
    Human Behavior in Design and Planning. Examines reciprocal relationships between people and their built and natural environments, tracing major issues and approaches in design research to understand how people are influenced by the environment and how they can create healthy, just, and livable places.

  • ENVD 3001 -- Environment and Behavior
    Environment and Behavior. Examines the social and behavioral aspects of relationships between people and the designed environment. Gives special attention to antecedent factors (why we have the environments we do), implications of given arrangements for special population groups, and responses to incongruent environments. Open to nonmajors on a space available basis.

  • ENVS 3001 -- Sustainable Solutions Consulting
    Sustainable Solutions Consulting. Introduces students to green design, industrial ecology, and life cycle analysis. Students use basic techniques of environmental auditing to analyze the CUBoulder campus. Prereq., any twosemester science sequence. Restricted to junior and senior ENVS majors.

  • GEOG 3682 -- Geography of International Development
    Geography of International Development. Compares and contrasts global characteristics and processes of development, emphasizing the developing countries of the world. Integrates theories of development, specific development topics, and case studies to explore the problems of development. Recommended prereqs., GEOG 1982, 1992, 2002, or 2412.

  • INVS 4302 -- Critical Thinking in Development
    Critical Thinking in Development. Exposes students to current issues in the political economy of development. Subjects range from globalization, democratization, and economic development. Specifically, the course explores the international and domestic determinants of economic development with special reference to currency markets, foreign direct investment, trade, and democratization. Prereqs., PSCI 2012 or IAFS 1000, ECON 2010 and 2020, and one upperdivision PSCI course. Same as PSCI 4732. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • OPIM 6930 -- Assessing Sustainable Energy Technologies
    Assessing Sustainable Energy Technologies. Focuses on the commercialization prospects of emerging energy technologies, including solar, wind, biomass, oceanic, geothermal, hydropower, fuel cell (hydrogen), nuclear, and other more exotic energy sources. Investigates the technology feasibility, economic viability and progress of each technology, as well as its economic opportunities and challenges.

  • PSCI 4012 -- Global Development
    Global Development. Analyzes development theory, case studies in development strategies, and the problems and promises of development: specifically issues of gender, environment, labor, corruption and poverty. The primary focus is on explanations for variation in level of development over time and across countries. Prereq., PSCI 2012, ECON 2020, IAFS 1000, or one upperdivision PSCI course. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies. 

  • COMM 2500 -- Interpersonal Communication
    Interpersonal Communication. Focuses on basic processes in facetoface interaction, including verbal and nonverbal messages, coordination in conversation, messages about self and others, and communication in personal relationships. Emphasizes theory and concepts rather than skills. Recommended prereqs., COMM 1210 and 1600. Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

  • COMM 2600 -- Organizational Communication
    Organizational Communication. Provides a communicatively based definition of formal organization and deals with individualorganizational relationships. Addresses topics such as organizational theory, organizational culture, power, technology, decision making, teamwork, leadership, diversity, gender, socialization, and ethics. Recommended prereqs., COMM 1210 and 1600. Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

  • COMM 4300 -- Senior Seminar: Rhetoric
    Senior Seminar: Rhetoric. Reviews current theory and research on topics such as rhetoric and publics, rhetoric as an interpretive social science, and rhetoric of social movements and political campaigns. May be taken twice for credit on different topics. Prereqs., COMM 3210 and 3300. Restricted to junior or senior Communication majors. Same as COMM 5300.

  • COMM 4510 -- Senior Seminar: Interpersonal Communication
    Senior Seminar: Interpersonal Communication. Reviews current theory and research on topics such as strategic interaction, relationship formation and maintenance, and identity and selfpresentation. May be taken twice for credit on different topics. Prereqs., COMM 3210 and 3300. Restricted to junior or senior Communication majors.

  • COMM 4600 -- Senior Seminar: Organizational Communication
    Senior Seminar: Organizational Communication. Reviews current theory and research on topics such as communication and organizational decision making, organizational culture, gender relations, communication technology, and power and control in organizations. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours on different topics. Prereqs., COMM 3210 and 3300. Restricted to junior or senior Communication majors. Same as COMM 5600.

  • GEOG 1982 -- World Regional Geography
    World Regional Geography. Involves an intellectual journey around the globe, stopping at major regions to study the people, their environments, and how they interact. Topics include the political/economic tensions in changing Europe, conflicts in Brazilian rain forests, transitions facing African peoples, and rapid changes in China. Meets MAPS requirement for social science: geography.

  • HUMN 4835 -- Literature and Social Violence
    Literature and Social Violence. Provides a theoretical understanding of heightened awareness arising from literary and sociological investigations of contemporary sources of social violence (gang culture, racism, domestic violence), combined with the concrete knowledge offered by an internship in a social service agency. Optional internship credit is available. Restricted to sophomores/juniors/seniors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • INVS 4932 -- Community Leadership in Action, Part 2
    Community Leadership in Action, Part 2. Develops students’ expertise as community leaders working for a just and sustainable world. Under the supervision of an instructor and a community advisor, students learn organizational and leadership skills by designing, implementing and evaluating a communitybased project. Firsthand experience provides students with a deepened understanding of the complex issues facing humanity, and competence with solutionbased strategies. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Same as LDSP 4932.

  • LING 1000 -- Language in U.S. Society
    Language in U.S. Society. Nontechnical exploration of the ways that language is used in America. Emphasizes language as a social institution and how values and goals of both public institutions and private groups shape and are shaped by language and its use. Meets MAPS requirement for social science: general. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context or contemporary societies.

  • LING 2400 -- Language and Gender
    Language and Gender. Familiarizes students with the effects of gender on language use; discusses popular beliefs and scholarly theories about language and communication. Provides students with tools for exploring the role of language and gender. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • LING 3500 -- Language and the Public Interest
    Language and the Public Interest. Studies language in public and private use, concentrating on semantic devices as found in language of political propaganda, advertising, business, and government, as well as everyday use of language between people.

  • MKTG 4650 -- Institutional Relationships and Strategy
    Institutional Relationships and Strategy. Focuses on the management of a firm’s relationships with other businesses. Addresses businesstobusiness marketing strategies, relationships with channel members, and strategic alliances/partnerships. Topics include relationship structures, power, conflict, negotiation, industry analysis, selection of business partners, and managing for longterm stability. Prereqs., MKTG 3250 and 3350.

  • PACS 3800 -- Topics in Peace and Conflict Studies
    Topics in Peace and Conflict Studies. Content varies depending on instructor. May provide an overview of the field, cover scientific, philosophical, or historical approaches, or analyze a specific substantive topic.

  • PHIL 2200 -- Major Social Theories
    Major Social Theories. Introductory study of major philosophies of the past in relation to political, economic, and social issues. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • PRLC 1820 -- Community Issues in Leadership
    Community Issues in Leadership. Explores challenges to leadership at the community level such as drug abuse, poverty, decline of infrastructure, care of the aged, etc. Gives particular attention to the development of effective leadership responses to community difficulties at university, city, state, and national levels. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • PRLC 2810 -- Global Issues in Leadership
    Global Issues in Leadership. Examines the challenges of leadership posed by change and major global issues affecting everyone. Explores issues such as human rights, hunger, disease, largescale collective violence, and environmental deterioration with a special emphasis on effective, longterm leadership strategies.

  • PRLC 2820 -- Multilevel Issues in Leadership
    Multilevel Issues in Leadership. Studies multilevel issues that originate in organizational settings but carry community and global implications. Encourages students to fully explore the complexity and interrelatedness of issues with a special emphasis on leadership and ethical implications.

  • PRLC 3810 -- Global Issues in Leadership
    Global Issues in Leadership. Examines the challenges to leadership posed by major global issues. Problems in the areas of human rights, hunger, disease, largescale collective violence, and environmental deterioration are explored with a special emphasis on the development of effective,longterm leadership strategies. Prereqs., PRLC 1810, PRLC 1820, and PRLC 2820.

  • PSCI 3062 -- Revolution and Political Violence
    Revolution and Political Violence. Studies and evaluates alternative theoretical frameworks for the analysis of revolution and political violence. Theoretical material is firmly couched in case situations, such as ethnic, class, colonial, urban, racial, and religious conflicts. Prereq., PSCI 1101, 2012, or IAFS 1000.

  • RLST 4450 -- Religion and Nonviolence
    Religion and Nonviolence. Studies theories of nonviolence developed by major thinkers and movements, especially in the U.S., in the context of their religious commitments and beliefs and their historical circumstances.

  • SEWL 2020 -- Civic Engagement
    Civic Engagement. Explores the concept of citizenship and develops students’ leadership skills through discussions and servicelearning. Working with Sewall faculty mentors, students discuss citizenship and related topics and learn concretely about aspects of the larger community by choosing a local community organization, becoming actively involved in its programs, and presenting their work at a culminating symposium. May be repeated up to 4 total credit hours.

  • SOCY 1004 -- Deviance in U.S. Society
    Deviance in U.S. Society. Examines the social construction of deviance in the U.S., the process of acquiring a deviant identity and managing deviant stigma, and the social organization of deviant act, lifestyles, relationships and careers. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • SOCY 2041 -- The Social Construction of Reality
    The Social Construction of Reality. Analyzes the human environment as a human product. Studies how all things that construct the objective social facts of our social world are created, reproduced, maintained, and distributed by specific human interaction processes.

  • SOCY 3151 -- Self in Modern Society
    Self in Modern Society. Explores how modern social institutions and culture shape our personal experiences, how personal experiences can affect the nature of those, institutions and culture, and how strategies can be developed for achieving balance between the individual and society. Prereqs., SOCY 1001 and SOCY 3001 3011. Restricted to junior/senior SOCY majors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context or ideals and values.

  • SOCY 4021 -- Conflict Management in Social Systems
    Conflict Management in Social Systems. Explores conflict resolution theory and method as applied to interpersonal, intergroup, and interorganization conflict. Prereqs., SOCY 1001, and SOCY 3001 or 3011.

  • SOCY 4047 -- Topics in Environment and Society
    Topics in Environment and Society. Variety of courses taught by visiting and regular faculty. See current departmental announcements for specific content. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours for different topics. 

  • COMM 3000 -- Issues in Communication
    Issues in Communication. Explores select issues in communication. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours on different issues. Prereqs., COMM 1210 and 1600 or instructor consent. Restricted to juniors or seniors only.

  • ETHN 4324 -- Media Institutions and Economics
    Media Institutions and Economics. Introduces the institutions and practices of the media industries. Surveys the histories, structures, and activities of these organizations and the contemporary issues surrounding them. Prereq., ETHN 2001, 2004,or 2064. Restricted to juniors/seniors. Same as JOUR 4321. Formerly AMST 4321.

  • GEEN 1100 -- Social Impact of Technology
    Social Impact of Technology. Introduces undergraduate students to the social impact of technology and how technology impacts all aspects of life, the health of planet Earth, and how people interact with each other. Fulfills Engineering social science requirements. Restricted to freshmen and sophomore engineering majors.

  • JOUR 2011 -- Media and Public Culture
    Media and Public Culture. Introduces the rise and development of mediated communication and its impact on and role within the formation of modern culture and public life. Restricted to journalism majors.

  • JOUR 4201 -- Media, Culture and Globalization
    Media, Culture and Globalization. Surveys the political and economic structures of media systems in developed and developing countries and discusses the impact of privatization, ownership consolidation, and globalization on the flow of information across national borders. Also looks at how global media flows and counterflows affect conceptions of nationhood and cultural identity.

  • JOUR 4211 -- Media Criticism
    Media Criticism. Introduces the critical perspectives most often employed in qualitative media analysis: semiology, structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalytical criticism, sociological criticism, etc. Texts from contemporary print and broadcast media. Same as JOUR 5311.

  • JOUR 4301 -- Media Ethics
    Media Ethics. Provides students with an overview of the theories, ethics codes, and analytical models that are used in journalism, public relations, and advertising. Introduces students to a variety of ethical issues that can arise across media professions, as well as the industry practices that can lead to ethical lapses, and teaches students how to challenge those practices. Restricted to junior/senior journalism students. Same as JOUR 5301.

  • JOUR 4311 -- Mass Communication Criticism
    Mass Communication Criticism. Introduces students to the critical perspectives most often employed in qualitative media analysis: semiology, structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalytical criticism, sociological criticism, etc. Texts from contemporary print and broadcast media. Same as JOUR 5311.

  • JOUR 4341 -- International Media and Global Crises
    International Media and Global Crises. Examines strengths and limits on media’s role in globalized crises (e.g., financial, climate change, health) in light of changing distribution of global power. Introduction to current crises; contextanalytical approach to media technologies, financing, and uses; application to national cases.

  • JOUR 4371 -- Media and Religion
    Media and Religion. Examines the way religion uses media as a social and political force. Introduces the major themes and trends in the mediation of religion and the religious inflection of the media in professional, popular, and emerging media contexts. Same as JOUR 5371, RLST 4371.

  • JOUR 4711 -- Media and Culture
    Media and Culture. Examines culture in the form of discourse, symbols, and texts transmitted through the media. Explores the relationship between such mediated culture and social myth and ideology. Same as JOUR 5711.

  • JOUR 4791 -- Media and the Public
    Media and the Public. Provides an overview of how publishing in print and electronic forms has been tied closely to democratic ideals for centuries. Explores how the idea of the public is central to the theory and practice of media politics, and how the contested concepts of "the public sphere" and "public opinion" have long been linked to debates about the proper relationship between media and democratic citizenship. Same as JOUR 5791. 

  • ECON 2020 -- Principles of Macroeconomics
    Principles of Macroeconomics. Provides an overview of the economy, examining the flows of resources and outputs and the factors determining the levels of income and prices. Explores policy problems of inflation, unemployment, and economic growth. Prereq., ECON 2010. Credit not granted for this course and ECON 1000 and 1001. Meets MAPS requirement for social sciences: general. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • ECON 3403 -- International Economics and Policy
    International Economics and Policy. Examines national and supranational policies that affect the international economy, with attention to trade barriers, economic nationalism and regionalism, international political economy, exchange market intervention, and international transmission of economic perturbations. Prereqs., ECON 1000, or ECON 2010 and 2020. Restricted to nonmajors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • ECON 3535 -- Natural Resource Economics
    Natural Resource Economics. Integrates economic analysis with life science aspects of natural resource systems to develop social policies for use of natural resources. Studies economists’ approaches to resources policy analysis and applies them to energy, forestry, fisheries, mineral, and water systems. Prereq., ECON 1000 or 2010. Restricted to nonmajors. Credit not granted for this course and ECON 4535. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • ECON 3545 -- Environmental Economics
    Environmental Economics. Highlights causes of excessive environmental pollution and tools for controlling it through economic analysis, values of preservation, and distribution of costs and benefits from environmental protection programs. Prereq., ECON 1000 or 2010. Restricted to nonmajors. Credit not granted for this course and ECON 4545. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • ECON 4211 -- Economics of the Public Sector
    Economics of the Public Sector. Focuses on taxation and public expenditures. Topics include economic rationale for government action, economic theory of government behavior, and effects of government policies on allocation of resources and distribution of income. Prereqs., ECON 3070 and 3818.

  • ECON 4242 -- Urban Economics: The Economics of Cities
    Urban Economics: The Economics of Cities. Considers the economic forces that drive households and jobs to congregate in metropolitan areas. It then considers the forces within the city that determine how the established cities "look" — how rents vary with location, the distribution of jobs and households within a city, urban sprawl, and the sorting of households between neighborhoods. Finally it considers some government policies relating to land use and housing. Prereqs., ECON 3070 and 3818.

  • ECON 4413 -- International Trade
    International Trade. Focuses on theories of international trade and its impacts on economic welfare. Analyzes commercial policy, including tariffs, nontariff barriers, retaliation, regional integration, and factor migration. Prereq., ECON 3070.

  • ECON 4535 -- Natural Resource Economics
    Natural Resource Economics. Analysis of problems associated with socially optimal use of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources over time. Problems of common property resources, irreversible forms of development, and preservation of natural areas. Prereq., ECON 3070. Credit not granted for this course and ECON 3535.

  • ECON 4545 -- Environmental Economics
    Environmental Economics. Examines the effects of economic growth on the environment; application of economic theory of external diseconomies, costbenefit analysis, program budgeting, and welfare economics to problems of the physical environment. Prereq., ECON 3070. Credit not granted for this course and ECON 3545.

  • ECON 4616 -- Labor Economics
    Labor Economics. Examines the influence of markets, unions, and government on labor allocation and remuneration. Analyzes human capital, discrimination, mobility and migration, productivity, unemployment, and inflation. Compares outcomes under competition with those in a world marked by shared market power and bargaining. Prereq., ECON 3070.

  • ECON 4646 -- Topics in Health Economics
    Topics in Health Economics. Growth in health expenditures worldwide over the past three decades has led to an increase in research in health economics and its importance in public policy in developed and developing countries. The purpose of this course is to encourage students to read, think, and do research on issues in health economics. This course will cover issues that are pertinent to the U.S., other developed and developing countries. It will cover the basics of health economics such as health production functions and the role for government as well as touching on topical issues such as health care reform. Prereq., ECON 3070. Recommended prereq., ECON 3818.

  • ECON 4784 -- Economic Development
    Economic Development. Explores empirical, theoretical, and policy issues in economic development. Examines topics with reference to the developing countries: income distribution and poverty, demographic change, labor force employment and migration, human capital, physical capital, natural resources and the environment, industrial structure, international trade, and finance. Prereqs., ECON 3070 or 3080.

  • ECON 4794 -- Economic Growth
    Economic Growth. Introduces theories explaining why differences in standards of living among countries are so large. Examines a variety of data on historical experiences of economic growth. Surveys recent research on why some countries are so rich and some are so poor, and why some countries grow so quickly and others grow so slowly. Prereqs., ECON 1088 or equivalent, and ECON 3070 or 3080. 

  • PSCI 4183 -- International Law
    International Law. Investigates the body of law that regulates relations between nation states and provides a framework for the solving of common problems. Explores its nature and effectiveness as well as its adaptability to a changing environment. Prereq., PSCI 2223.

  • PSCI 4241 -- Constitutional Law 1
    Constitutional Law 1. Focuses on the nature and scope of American constitutional principles as developed by the U.S. Supreme Court: federalism, jurisdiction of the federal courts, separation of powers, the taxing power, and the commerce power. Involves the case method. Prereq., PSCI 1101 and junior or senior standing.

  • PSCI 4251 -- Constitutional Law 2
    Constitutional Law 2. Continuation of PSCI 4241. Emphasizes war power, powers of the president, citizenship, the Bill of Rights, and the Civil War amendments. Involves the case method. Not open to freshmen. Prereq., PSCI 1101 or instructor consent. 

  • COMM 3340 -- Political Communication
    Political Communication. Provides an overview of the role of communication in contemporary political life. Topics include political communication theories, political campaign communication, media and political communication, and the role of political communication in promoting democracy and public policy. Prereqs., COMM 1210 and 1600.

  • GEOG 4712 -- Political Geography
    Political Geography. Systematic study of relations between geography and politics, especially as background for better understanding of international affairs. Includes topics such as frontiers and boundaries, power analysis, geopolitics, international political economy, and strategic concepts. Recommended prereqs., GEOG 1982, 1992, 2002, 2412, IAFS 1000, PSCI 2012 or 2223. Restricted to GEOG, IAFS, ENVS, junior/senior majors. Same as GEOG 5712.

  • GSAP 1000 -- World Politics and Society
    World Politics and Society. Explores the history leading up toand away from- the attacks of 9/11 within an American framework. Topics to be covered include: America’s relationship with key countries since 1945; the rise of Muslim extremism; modern terrorism and its meaning; the importance of oil; and the events of 9/11 and the Bush Administration’s response to it, at home and abroad. Restricted to G-RAP students.

  • HIST 2126 -- Modern U.S. Politics and Diplomacy
    Traces the development of contemporary U.S. politics and foreign relations. Analyzes subjects such as the Cold War, the relationship between foreign and domestic politics, the developing meaning of conservatism, liberalism, and radicalism. Explains the impact of race, gender, class, and immigration. Specific course focus may vary. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context or contemporary societies.

  • PHIL 4200 -- Contemporary Political Philosophy
    Contemporary Political Philosophy. Provides a survey of recent approaches to political philosophy: liberalism (Rawls, Disorkin); libertarianism (Nozick); communitarianism (Sandel, Macintyre); and feminism (Jaggar). Topics and readings vary with the instructor. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Prereqs., PHIL 2200, 3200, and 12 hours of philosophy course work. Restricted to juniors and seniors. Same as PHIL 5200.

  • PSCI 2012 -- Introduction to Comparative Politics
    Introduction to Comparative Politics. Most countries confront a variety of common political problems, including how to gain popular support, what kinds of political institutions are most appropriate, and how to distribute burdens and benefits to different segments of the population. Concentrates on learning how to compare different political systems and provides illustrative examples from several countries in both the industrialized and nonindustrialized world. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • PSCI 2223 -- Introduction to International Relations
    Introduction to International Relations. Introduces the field of international relations, with general survey of the theories, histories, and problems of historical and contemporary relations among state and nonstate actors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • PSCI 3031 -- Political Parties and Interest Groups
    Political Parties and Interest Groups. Highlights the practice of party politics in the United States, including the nature, structure, organization, and functions of political parties and interest groups. Analyzes interest group politics and political behavior. Prereq., PSCI 1101.

  • PSCI 3051 -- Public Opinion and Political Behavior
    Public Opinion and Political Behavior. Examines measurement of public opinion and evaluation of its impact on governmental policy formation, including survey research techniques and field work in opinion sampling. Prereq., PSCI 1101.

  • PSCI 3064 -- Environmental Political Theory
    Environmental Political Theory. Examines environmental discourses as conceptual means for theorizing environmental politics, and applies normative political theories to contemporary environmental policy issues. Considers the roles of political actors (individuals, groups, the state) in defining and addressing environmental problems on local, national, and global levels. Recommended prereq., PSCI 2004. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • PSCI 3071 -- Urban Politics
    Urban Politics. Examines the structure of political, social, and economic influence in urban areas. Focuses on the relationship of the political system to governmental, social, and economic institutions and the contemporary policy processes in American cities. Prereq., PSCI 1101. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context.

  • PSCI 3163 -- American Foreign Policy
    American Foreign Policy. Examines foundations, assumptions, objectives, dynamics, and methods of U.S. foreign policy since WW II. Gives special attention to domestic and external problems of adapting U.S. policy to the changing world environment. Prereq., PSCI 2223. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context.

  • PSCI 4092 -- Comparative Urban Politics
    Comparative Urban Politics. Comparatively analyzes major urban systems in different political/economic settings and ThirdWorld countries. Gives special attention to political and economic factors shaping urbanization processes and distinctive policy issues in these different settings. Prereqs., PSCI 1101 and 3071 recommended.

  • PSCI 4193 -- International Political Economy
    International Political Economy. Analyzes issues at the intersection of international politics and international economics. Utilizes theories and concepts from both economics and political science to understand issues in trade, finance, development and migration. Prereq., PSCI 2223. Recommended prereq., ECON 1000.

  • PSCI 4221 -- Political Psychology
    Political Psychology. Examines the psychological foundations of political decisionmaking among citizens and elites. Considers the role of political psychology in explaining political behavior and outcomes at the individual and collective level. Prereq., PSCI 1101.

  • PSCI 4252 -- Politics of Ethnicity and Nationalism
    Politics of Ethnicity and Nationalism. Analyzes ethnic identity as a factor in contemporary politics. Deals extensively with the role of ethnic groups in political mobilization, the development of national collective consciousness, nation building, and international relations. Explores the influence of religion, language, history, culture and class on ethnic group formation and behavior. Prereq., PSCI 2012.

  • PSCI 4341 -- Political Communication, Persuasion, and Public Policy
    Political Communication, Persuasion, and Public Policy. Addresses the idea of political communication as a central aspect of policy making and how the inability to develop persuasive political arguments in particular circumstances invites policy failure. Examines aspects of political communication as it applies to citizens, political decision makers, and specific public policies. Prereq., PSCI 1101 or instructor consent. Restricted to juniors and seniors.

  • PSCI 4701 -- Symbolic Politics
    Symbolic Politics. Introduces uses and abuses of symbols as instruments and indicators of political change. Prereq., PSCI 1101. Recommended prereq., junior or senior standing.

  • PSCI 4704 -- Politics and Language
    Politics and Language. Explores the use of language in politics. Examines in depth the political nature and meaning of language, including its significance, philosophy, and practice. Prereq., PSCI 2004. Restricted to juniors or seniors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies. 

  • COMM 2360 -- Campaigns and Revolutions
    Campaigns and Revolutions. Introduces concepts in rhetoric and argumentation that are used to explain significant social and political changes in our society. The goal is to show how social actors use rhetoric to promote some social goals and hinder others. Recommended prereqs., COMM 1210 and 1600. Restricted to sophomores/juniors/seniors.

  • ETHN 2232 -- Contemporary African American Social Movements
    Contemporary African American Social Movements. Examines selected case studies of African American collective behavior in a historical context. Emphasizes an indepth investigation of the continuing African American struggle for social/democratic rights. Formerly BLST 2200. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity or contemporary societies.

  • ETHN 3671 -- People of Color and Social Movements
    People of Color and Social Movements. People of color the world over are struggling for sovereignty, independence, civil and human rights, food security, decent wages and working conditions, healthy housing, and freedom from environmental racism and other forms of imperialism. Course analyzes and brings alive these struggles. Prereq., ETHN 2001 or equivalent. Restricted to juniors/seniors. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity. Formerly ETHN 3675.

  • HIST 2636 -- Women of Color and Activism
    Women of Color and Activism. Studies the history of social activism in the United States by women of color, with an emphasis on modes of social activism, issues that have organized specific communities of color, issues that have crossed ethnic/racial boundaries, and the interaction of women from different ethnic/racial groups, including women if color and white women. Recommended prereq., WMST 2000 or 2600. Same as WMST 2400. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context. GPA of 2. HIST majors.

  • HIST 4636 -- Lesbian and Gay History: Culture, Politics, and Social Change in the United States
    Lesbian and Gay History: Culture, Politics, and Social Change in the United States. Considers current theoretical approaches to the history of sexuality and traces the changing meaning of samesex sexuality in the United States through investigation of lesbian/gay identity formation, community development, politics, and queer cultural resistance. Prereq., HIST 1015 or 1025 or 1035 or 1045 or WMST 2000. Same as HIST 5636 and WMST 4636.

  • INVS 3302 -- Facilitating Peaceful Community Change
    Facilitating Peaceful Community Change. Students gain knowledge and skills that enable them to become effective facilitators of community goals. Focuses on understanding the processes of community building with a multicultural emphasis. Students are encouraged to apply concepts of life experiences and to examine themselves as potential change agents. Theory and summer experience are integrated. Prereq., admission to INVST. Coreq., INVS 3912. Same as WMST 3302.

  • INVS 3402 -- Implementing Social and Environmental Change
    Implementing Social and Environmental Change. Examines grassroots democracy as a means for creating comprehensive, solutionbased strategies to address social and environmental problems. Students develop an understanding of the use of democracy for positive social change, identify how changes are initiated within movements, and learn the theory and practice of effective and responsible change efforts.

  • INVS 4402 -- Nonviolent Social Movements
    Nonviolent Social Movements. Explores theories of democracy and development in relation to movements for nonviolent social change. Focuses on means and ends, spirituality, leadership, decisionmaking, civil society, cooperative economics, ecology and decentralized powers. Restricted to senior SOCY/PSCI majors. Same as SOCY 4111.

  • SOCY 3141 -- Social Movements in the U.S.
    Social Movements in the U.S. Considers theory and research about American social movements. Emphasizes leadership, ideology, recruitment, strategy, organizational dynamics, public response, and reasons for success or failure. Prereqs., SOCY 1001, and SOCY 3001 or 3011. Restricted to junior/senior SOCY majors.

  • SOCY 4111 -- Nonviolent Social Movements
    Nonviolent Social Movements. Explores theories of democracy and development in relation to movements for nonviolent social change. Focuses on means and ends, spirituality, leadership, decision–making, civil society, cooperative economics, ecology, and decentralized power. Prereqs., SOCY 1001, and 3001 or 3011. Restricted to senior SOCY or PSCI majors. Same as INVS 4402.

  • WMST 2400 -- Women of Color and Activism
    Women of Color and Activism. Studies the history of social activism in the United States by women of color, with an emphasis on modes of social activism, issues that have organized specific communities of color, issues that have crossed ethnic/racial boundaries, and the interaction of women from different ethnic/racial groups, including women of color and white women. Recommended prereq., WMST 2000 or 2600. Same as HIST 2636. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context.

  • WMST 3656 -- History of Women in Progressive Social Movements
    History of Women in Progressive Social Movements. Explores women’s involvement in the United States, in international peace, feminist, and civil rights movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. Teaches research methods by using a variety of primary and secondary sources and writing an original research paper. Prereq., WMST 2000 or HIST 1015 or 1025. Same as HIST 3656. 

  • ARSC 3001 -- Reconciliation and Diversity in the 21st Century: The South Africa Model
    Reconciliation and Diversity in the 21st Century: The South Africa Model. Examines the concept of reconciliation from a multidimensional and multidisciplinary approach as it specifically contributes to subjects of difference, inequality, and historical legacies of intractable relations. Using an experiential approach, the study of reconciliation is situated in an international environment in which reconciliation is being practiced and later in the United States context. Recommended prereq., any course with substantive race, class, gender, difference, and inequality emphasis. Offered through Study Abroad Program. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity. GPA of 2.

  • SOCY 4024 -- Juvenile Delinquency
    Juvenile Delinquency. Examines the history, incidence and prevalence of delinquent behavior, as well as why children become involved in criminal activity. Prereq., SOCY 1001 or 1004. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • SOCY 4084 -- Punishment, Law and Society
    Punishment, Law and Society. Places the current state of punishment in the U.S. in historical and cross national context. It examines key features of penal systems, and key sociological theories about the relationship between punishment and society. Prereqs., SOCY 1001 or 1004. 

  • ECON 4292 -- Migration, Immigrant Adaptation, and Development
    Migration, Immigrant Adaptation, and Development. Examines historical and current patterns of migration with an emphasis in international movement. Looks at leading migration theories related to both origin- and destinationbased explanations while critically looking at the role of development as a potential cause and consequence of population movement. Finally, covers some aspects of immigrants’ social and economic adaptation to their host society. Prereq., ECON 3070. Same as GEOG 4292.

  • ETHN 2001 -- Foundations: Race and Ethnicity in the United States
    Foundations: Race and Ethnicity in the United States. Introduction to race, ethnicity and gender in the United States. Focuses on the five major racialized groups (African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanas and Chicanos, European Americans and Indigenous peoples) in the U.S. The course design centers on historical and contemporary ideologies and systems that have constructed and continue to define, shape, and impact the significance of race and ethnicity in our economic, political and social lives. Formerly ETHN 2000.

  • ETHN 3031 -- Racist Ideologies
    Racist Ideologies. Explores the origins and evolution of racism as a political and religious force in American life, beginning with Puritan ideology in colonial New England, proceeding through the era of Manifest Destiny, and ending in the present day. Special attention is paid to the history of organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan, and emergence of Christian identity doctrine. Prereq., ETHN 2001 or equivalent. Formerly ETHN 3013.

  • ETHN 4001 -- Screening Race, Class, and Gender in the U.S.
    Screening Race, Class, and Gender in the U.S. and the Global Borderland. Engaging with the ways in which racial, class, gender and sexual oppression intersect, this class examines several filmic productions by and about diasporic and subaltern subjects (especially children and women) in the U.S./Mexico borderlands, and the urban ethnic metropoles of the global borderlands. Prereq., ETHN 2001 or equivalent ETHN course. Same as ETHN 5001 and FILM 4001. Formerly ETHN 3001.

  • ETHN 4344 -- 20th Century American Intellectual History
    20th Century American Intellectual History. Addresses the impacts of political, social, and economic developments on ideas about democracy, science, race, gender, faith, the supposed mission of America, and the role of intellectuals in society. Prereq., ETHN 2001, 2004, or 2064. Restricted to juniors/seniors. Same as HIST 4346. Formerly AMST 4346.

  • FARR 1561 -- Nonviolence for Everyday: Meditation and Other Helpful Habits
    Nonviolence for Everyday: Meditation and Other Helpful Habits. Focuses on the challenge of achieving nonviolence on a daytoday basis by maintaining a peaceful, focused frame of mind. Explores ways to train the mind, including methods that may aid healing.

  • FARR 2400 -- Understanding Privilege and Oppression in Contemporary Society
    Understanding Privilege and Oppression in Contemporary Society. Through a focus on race, class, sexual orientation, and physical ability, this course explores privilege, oppression, and empowerment in the United States. Through community service, students learn how oppression and privilege interact, and apply classroom learning to community experiences. Same as LDSP 2400. Approved for the arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity or contemporary societies.

  • HIST 4640 -- Women, Gender and War
    Women, Gender and War. Study of how women experience war, and how the structure, practice and memory of war, and the rights and obligations of military service structure gender (masculinity and femininity) and are structured by the gender system. Prereq., HIST 1020 or 1025 or 1040 or 1045, or WMST 2000. Restricted to sophomores, juniors or seniors. Same as WMST 4640.

  • HONR 3810 -- Privilege and Modern Social Construction
    Privilege and Modern Social Construction. This course examines social constructions that lead to productive interactions between and among American social communities. Using case studies and humanistic accounts, students analyze the lived experiences of a unique group or successful citizens who routinely evidence productive practices of multicultural engagement. Through interactions with policy makers and community practitioners, students design and enact activities that allow them to reconstruct their personal patterns of privilege practices of their peer groups in various settings. Prereq., HONR 1810 or demonstrated academic study of race, class, and gender.

  • INVS 3000 (3) -- Innovative Approaches to Contemporary Issues through Service Learning
    Innovative Approaches to Contemporary Issues through Service Learning. Explores creative approaches for solving complex social and environmental issues, with a focus on peace and population. Students analyze the root causes of issues in theoretical and historical contexts, and develop their understanding of effective and innovative approaches to change. This course has a requirement of community service. Recommended prereq., upperdivision status. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • INVS 3304 -- Human Rights: Promotion and Protection, an NGO Perspective
    Explores the world of international human rights with a focus on the role of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in the evolution of human rights ideologies, social structures, technologies and strategies. Students examine the inter-relatedness and inter-dependence of human rights, and the work of non-governmental organizations as related to other institutions of civil society, national governments, and international bodies. Recommended prereq., INVS 1000. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • JOUR 4331 -- Gender, Race, Class, and Sexuality in Popular Culture
    Gender, Race, Class, and Sexuality in Popular Culture. Studies the construction, interconnections, and replications of gender, race, class, and sexuality in popular culture and how these constructs become cultural norms and mores. Uses critical methods with a focus on producing responsible viewers and readers. Same as JOUR 5331, WMST 4331.

  • LGBT 2000 -- Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
    Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies. Investigates the social and historical meanings of racial, gender, and sexual identities and their relationship to contemporary lesbian, bisexual, gay, and transgender communities. Same as WMST 2030. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • PSCI 3123 -- War, Peace, and Strategic Defense
    War, Peace, and Strategic Defense. Analyzes employment, or the threat of employing force, in securing American interests in the postCold War world. Gives special attention to utilities claimed for nuclear weapons, and alternatively, to weapons control and disarmament. Prereq., PSCI 2223.

  • PSCI 3206 -- The Environment and Public Policy
    The Environment and Public Policy. Considers constitutional, political, and geographic factors in development of public policy affecting the use of natural resources and management of the environment; organization, procedures, and programs for use of natural resources; and administration of environmental policies. Prereq., PSCI 1101. Restricted to sophomores/juniors/seniors.

  • PSCI 4173 -- International Organization
    International Organization. Analyzes international organizations to determine whether they are an effective instrument for achieving peace and security and for the promotion of human welfare. Prereq., PSCI 2223.

  • PSCI 4703 -- Alternative World Futures
    Alternative World Futures. Aims to help students think about the future of the world in a systematic way. Focuses on alternative projections and policies dealing with major problems. Prereq., PSCI 2223 and junior or senior standing.

  • PSCI 4771 -- Civil Rights and Liberties in America
    Civil Rights and Liberties in America. Implementation of rights and liberties in America. Examines fundamental issues of free speech, press, association, and religion along with rights to due process and equal protection under the law. Prereq., PSCI 2481. Restricted to juniors/seniors. GPA of at least 3.

  • PSCI 4783 -- Global Issues
    Global Issues. Studies the principal issues confronting humanity that affect stability and survivability and their economic, social, and political implications. Prereq., PSCI 2012 or 2223. Restricted to seniors.

  • SOCY 1016 -- Sex, Gender, and Society 1
    Sex, Gender, and Society 1. Examines status and power differences between the sexes at individual and societal levels. Emphasizes historical context of gender roles and status, reviews major theories of gender stratification. Same as WMST 1016. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • SOCY 1021 -- United States Race and Ethnic Relations
    United States Race and Ethnic Relations. An examination of race and minority problems in U.S. society, including the psychological, social, and cultural sources of prejudice and discrimination. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context.

  • SOCY 2011 -- Contemporary Social Issues and Human Values
    Contemporary Social Issues and Human Values. Explores contemporary societies on a global scale. Focuses on such issues as capitalism, socialism, race and ethnic problems, sex discrimination, poverty and the concentration of wealth, crime and deviance, human rights and human values, peace and war.

  • SOCY 2031 -- Social Problems
    Social Problems. Examines U.S. society from a normative perspective emphasizing theories of social change. Considers such problems as distribution of power, unemployment, poverty, racism and sexism, the changing role of the family, and drugs. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • SOCY 2077 -- Environment and Society
    Environment and Society. Examines how both natural and built environments influence human behavior and social organization. Focuses on microenvironments and their influence on individuals; the impact of macroenvironments on societal organization; and environmental movements. Credit not granted for this course and SOCY 3091. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

  • SOCY 3044 -- Race, Class, Gender, and Crime
    Race, Class, Gender, and Crime. Overview of race, class, gender, and ethnicity issues in offending, victimization, and processing by the justice system. Examines women and people of color employed in the justice system. Prereq., SOCY 1001 or 1004. Same as WMST 3044.

  • SOCY 3046 -- Topics in Sex and Gender
    Topics in Sex and Gender. Faculty present courses based on their area of expertise and specialization in the field of sex and gender. Students should check current sociology department notices of course offerings for specific topics. Students may receive credit for this course up to three times for different topics. Prereqs., SOCY 1001, and SOCY 3001 or 3011. Restricted to junior/senior SOCY majors. Same as WMST 3046.

  • SOCY 3161 -- Sociological Perspectives on Race and Ethnicity
    Sociological Perspectives on Race and Ethnicity. Addresses three subtopics of race from a sociological perspective: ethnic and racial identities, immigration, and race and ethnicity in Latin America. Recommended prereq., SOCY 1001.

  • SOCY 3314 -- Violence Against Women and Girls
    Violence Against Women and Girls. Focuses on aspects of the victimization of women and girls that are "gendered" — namely, sexual abuse and intimate partner abuse. Also explores the importance of race, class, and sexuality in gendered violence. Same as WMST 3314.

  • SOCY 4000 -- Gender, Genocide, and Mass Trauma
    Gender, Genocide, and Mass Trauma. Studies the persistence of genocide and the effects of mass trauma on women and girls. Within the framework of political and social catastrophe, the course examines cataclysmic world events and the traumatic consequences for women of religious persecution, colonialism, slavery, and the genocides of the twentieth and twenty first centuries. Prereq., SOCY 1016 or WMST 2000. Same as WMST 4010.

  • SOCY 4016 -- Sex, Gender, and Society 2
    Sex, Gender, and Society 2. Studies status and power differences between the sexes at individual, group, and societal levels. Examines empirically established sex differences, and reviews biological, psychological, and sociological explanations for gender differences. Prereqs., SOCY 1016 or WMST 2000. Restricted to junior/senior SOCY majors. Same as WMST 4016.

  • SOCY 4031 -- Social Psychology
    Social Psychology. Studies individuals in social context. Reviews philosophical and sociological treatments of the relation between the individual and society. More specific topics include the socialization process,theories of human development and personality formation, language acquisition, conformity, aggression, sex differences in personality and gender identity, and the relation between attitudes and overt behavior. Prereqs., SOCY 1001, and SOCY 3001 or 3011. Restricted to junior/senior SOCY majors.

  • SOCY 4071 -- Social Stratification
    Social Stratification. Studies theories of class, ethnic, sex, and age stratification. Examines social inequality in the United States and analyzes the resulting conflicts. Prereqs., SOCY 1001, and SOCY 3001 or 3011. Restricted to junior/senior SOCY majors. Same as SOCY 5071.

  • WMST 1016 -- Sex, Gender, and Society 1
    Sex, Gender, and Society 1. Same as SOCY 1016. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • WMST 2030 -- Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
    Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies. Same as LGBT 2000. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • WMST 2050 -- Gender, Sexuality, and Popular Culture
    Gender, Sexuality, and Popular Culture. Explores diverse cultural forms such as film, popular fiction and nonfiction, music videos, public art, websites, blogs and zines which are shaped by, and in turn shape popular understandings of gender at the intersections of race, class, ability, religion, nation, and imperialism. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • WMST 2600 -- Gender, Race, and Class in a Global Context
    Gender, Race, and Class in a Global Context. Examines the positionality of women in terms of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and power relations in a global context. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies.

  • WMST 3000 -- Gender, Work, and Public Policy
    Gender, Work, and Public Policy. Provides an analytical framework for understanding the roles gender, sexuality, race and class play in defining the work worlds of women and men in society. Prereq., WMST 2000 or 2050.

  • WMST 3012 -- Women, Development, and Fertility
    Women, Development, and Fertility. Restricted to junior/senior WMST majors. Same as SOCY 3012. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • WMST 3314 -- Violence Against Women and Girls
    Violence Against Women and Girls. Focuses on aspects of the victimization of women and girls that are "gendered" — namely, sexual abuse and intimate partner abuse. Also explores the importance of race, class, and sexuality in gendered violence. Prereq., WMST 2000. Same as SOCY 3314.

  • WMST 3500 -- Global Gender Issues
    Global Gender Issues. Introduces global gender issues, such as the gendered division of labor in the global economy, migration, women’s human rights, environmental issues, gender violence in war, women in the military, nationalism and feminism, and the representation of the Third World in the United States. Offers students the opportunity to broaden their perspectives beyond the borders of the United States. Prereq., WMST 2000, 2050 or 2600. Restricted to sophomores/juniors/seniors.

  • WMST 3672 -- Gender and Global Economy
    Gender and Global Economy. Same as GEOG 3672. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

  • WMST 4010 -- Gender, Genocide, and Mass Trauma
    Gender, Genocide, and Mass Trauma. Studies the persistence of genocide and the effects of mass trauma on women and girls. Within the framework of political and social catastrophe, the course examines cataclysmic world events and the traumatic consequences for women of religious persecution, colonialism, slavery, and the genocides of the twentieth and twenty first centuries. Prereq., SOCY 1016 or WMST 2000. Same as SOCY 4000.

  • WMST 4300 -- Sex, Power, Politics: International Perspectives
    Sex, Power, Politics: International Perspectives. Studies the commercial trade of sexual labor in the global economy, examining theories and assumptions about sexualeconomic exchanges and gendered and racialized relations of power in the sex trade. Emphasizes prostitution. Recommended prereq., WMST 2600 or 3100. Restricted to juniors and seniors.

  • WMST 4636 -- Lesbian and Gay History: Culture and Politics and Social Change in the U.S.
    Lesbian and Gay History: Culture and Politics and Social Change in the U.S. Considers current theoretical approaches to the history of sexuality and traces the changing meaning of samesex sexuality in the U.S. through investigation of lesbian and gay identity formation, community development, politics, and queer cultural resistance. Prereqs., WMST 2000 and 2600, and junior or senior standing. Same as HIST 4636/5636.

  • WMST 4640 -- Women, Gender and War
    Women, Gender and War. Same as HIST 4640.