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Appendix B - Student Diversity Report
Campus Diversity Plan: A Blueprint for Action


Student Diversity Report, December 1998 -- University of Colorado at Boulder

Bachelors degrees

  • The number of minorities receiving bachelors degrees increased from 227 in 1986-87 to 510 in 1997-98; this is more than double '86-87 and the highest number ever. In 1997-98 13% of bachelors degrees awarded to US citizens went to minority students (African American, Asian American, Hispanic/Chicano, and Native American). The increase came from every racial/ethnic group. In 1997-98 seven out of eight minority bachelors recipients (434, or 85%) were Colorado residents.

  • The number of international students receiving bachelors degrees has steadily increased since at least 1990-91. In 1997-98 112 international students received bachelors degrees, more than double the 53 awarded in 1990-91.

  • Women have received 48-49% of all bachelors degrees awarded every year for at least the last ten.

Graduate-level degrees

  • The number of minorities receiving masters, doctoral, and law degrees has steadily increased, from 64 in 1986-87 to 171 in 1997-98. This is more than 2.5 times as many as a decade earlier and comes from increases in every degree type and in every racial/ethnic group. More than 90% of minorities receiving graduate-level degrees in 1997-98 are Colorado residents.

  • International students received 12% of masters, doctoral, and law degrees awarded in 1997-98. The number of international students receiving graduate-level degrees has remained stable for several years, at around 200 per year.

  • Women received 44% of masters, doctoral, and law degrees awarded in 1997-98, up from 37% in 1990-91.

Graduation and retention rates

  • The first-year retention rate for minority freshmen entering in fall 1997 is 77%, vs. 84% for non-minorities. Both are below their all-time highs. The rate for women, 84%, is consistently higher than that for men (82%).

  • The six-year graduation rate for minority freshmen entering in 1992 is 45%, as it has been for several years. This compares to 65% for non-minority freshmen. The rate for women, 63%, is consistently higher than that for men (59%).

  • The proportion of ever-graduating freshmen who take four years or less is one measure of speed or time to graduation. This measure varies widely: 62% of women who graduate take four years or less vs 44% >of males; 35% of minorities vs 55% of non-minorities take four years or less.

Enrollment

  • Despite a slight decrease from 1997, current minority undergraduate enrollment is 2,891, compared to 1,648 in fall 1986--a 75% increase. The percentage of undergraduates who are minorities increased from 9% in fall '86 to 14% in fall '98. Fall 1998 enrollment included 169 Native Americans, the highest number ever.

  • Minority graduate-level enrollment is now 466, compared to 253 in fall 1986--an 84% increase. The percentage of domestic (US citizens) graduate students who are minorities was 7% in fall '86, and is 11% in fall '98.

  • New freshmen entering in fall 1998 included 100 fewer minorities than in the all-time high year of 1991, or 14% vs. 20%.

Programs and planning

  • The campus established a new office of diversity and equity within the last year, headed by an associate vice chancellor for diversity and equity. Ofelia Miramontes of the school of education occupies this position on an interim basis. The office coordinates ongoing campus programming for ethnic minorities, women, individuals with disabilities, and gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgendered individuals. It has a comprehensive web site featuring policies, facts about CU-Boulder, links to student organizations, and a list of courses related to diversity and multiculturalism.