A place for tackling critical challenges in bioscience

The revolutionary Jennie Smoly Caruthers Biotechnology Building facilitates collaborative work on challenges ranging from biomedical issues like cancer, heart disease and tissue engineering to the development of new biofuels.

Feature Articles

SuviCa Inc. of Boulder and CU-Boulder completed an exclusive license agreement for a CU drug screening technology to identify novel therapies for cancer. 

Liz Bradley is a great professor because she loved being a student. The computer science professor graduated from MIT with three degrees, a B.S., M.S., and Ph.D., in electrical engineering and computer science.

A grant awarded to the Colorado Center for Biorefining and Biofuels, or C2B2, will allow students to conduct research related to the conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals.

An increase in inhibitions could reduce anxiety in individuals suffering from anxiety and, as a result, help improve their decision making.

Forensic scientists may soon have a valuable new item in their tool kits—a way to identify individuals using unique, telltale types of hand bacteria left behind on objects such as keyboards and computer mice, according to a new CU-Boulder study...

Doctors prescribing snake oil for their patients?  The scenario may not be as far-fetched as it sounds.

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Biotech at CU: impacting industry, community

Biosciences at CU-Boulder have an impact on society, addressing some of its critical challenges, while also parlaying into vital advances for local and global economies. 

Biotech at CU: collaboration and innovation

Bioscience at CU-Boulder happens in a building designed for collaboration among many units including chemical and biological engineering, biochemistry, and the Biofrontiers Institute. 

Undergrad's python research

Senior Ryan Doptis' biology research work entails close study of Burmese pythons.

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