News Releases

October 13, 1998

Most people know what to do when they open their front doors on Oct. 31st and find themselves confronted by a vampire, a mummy and a werewolf: they give them some candy.

According to CU-Boulder Professor Michael Preston, the history of trick-or-treating is an interesting and varied one. And today, "There's much more adult humor. There is an awful lot of cross-dressing," said Preston, as opposed to past generations, when there was not as much emphasis on disguise. For example:

October 12, 1998

Dipankar Chakravarti, the Ortloff Professor of Business at the College of Business and Administration at CU-Boulder, has been named interim dean of the college, while a committee begins a search this fall for a permanent dean.

Chakravarti replaces Larry Singell, who has returned to a faculty position in the economics department.

October 12, 1998

University of Colorado football fans will have a chance to help Boulder’s needy families while they cheer on the Buffs by donating food at the Oct. 17 home game.

CU-Boulder and Community Food Share will host a food drive at Folsom Stadium on Saturday, Oct. 17, when the Buffs take on Texas Tech. Canned and other non-perishable food or money contributions will be collected by student athletes and various CU coaches as fans enter the stadium.

A free pass to a CU men’s or women’s basketball or volleyball game will be given to each person who makes a contribution.

October 12, 1998

A look at the future of Colorado's tourism industry and an analysis of the state's economic dependence on tourism will be among the topics discussed at the 1998 Colorado Travel and Tourism Conference, Oct. 29 and 30.

The conference, which will be held in the University Memorial Center on the CU-Boulder campus, is sponsored by the Center for Sustainable Tourism, a research and service center in the College of Business and Administration, and the Colorado Travel and Tourism Authority.

October 12, 1998

Distinguished Professor Carl E. Wieman of the University of Colorado at Boulder has been named the recipient of the 1999 Arthur L. Schawlow Prize in Laser Science from the American Physical Society.

The prize recognizes outstanding contributions to basic research that uses lasers to advance knowledge of the fundamental properties of materials and their interaction with light. The prize is named for the Nobel Prize-winning scientist who played a major role in developing the laser and its applications and includes a $10,000 award.

October 8, 1998

The University of Colorado at Boulder will hold its annual Study Abroad Fair on Tuesday, Oct. 13, in the University Memorial Center's Glenn Miller Ballroom from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

The fair is designed to give students general information about study abroad programs including program costs, scholarship opportunities and financial aid.

Students and faculty who have participated in a study abroad program will be at the fair to discuss their experiences. Foreign students from countries where CU-Boulder offers programs also will be present to answer questions.

October 8, 1998

The Student Organization for Alumni Relations selected six outstanding CU-Boulder students during Homecoming weekend Sept. 25-27 to receive awards for academic acheivement, leadership and community service.

Two students received Academic Excellence awards, psychology majors Adrienne Ellis and Joseph Urgemah. Ellis, a senior, has a grade-point average of 3.99 and holds positions with the Campus Crusade for Christ and Alpha Phi Omega.

October 8, 1998

CU-Boulder anthropology Professor Dennis Van Gerven, known for his lively classroom presentations and his research on Nubian mummies, has been named the 1998 Colorado Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

October 7, 1998

The University of Colorado at Boulder has received a $2.7 million grant from the National Science Foundation to fund an innovative, interdisciplinary graduate training program in optical science and engineering.

October 7, 1998

The University of Colorado's applied mathematics department has been awarded $2.3 million from the National Science Foundation for a research and training grant designed to bring faculty and students together at all levels.

The highly competitive grants, known as the Vertical Integration of Research and Education, or VIGRE, were awarded to only five other universities: Harvard, Princeton, Columbia, Pennsylvania State and the University of Washington.

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