News Releases

May 26, 1998

The volume of the world's glaciers outside of Antarctica and the Greenland Ice Sheet continues to decline and the rate of ice loss continues to accelerate, according to a new University of Colorado at Boulder study.

"In the last century, there has been a significant decrease in the area and volume of glaciers, especially at mid- and low-latitudes," said Professor Emeritus Mark Meier of the geological sciences department. "The disappearance of glacier ice is more pronounced than we previously had thought."

May 26, 1998

Five University of Colorado at Boulder physics professors have been selected among the nation's 200 most outstanding speakers on physics by the American Physical Society.

They were the only physics professors to be cited in Colorado, and among only seven physicists to be cited in the state.

May 21, 1998

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is a joint release of Brown University, Carnegie Institution of Washington D.C., National Science Foundation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of Colorado, University of Oregon, University of Washington, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Visuals are available (see end of release).

Under the South Pacific, a new picture emerges of Earth's most volcanically active area.

May 21, 1998

A panel discussion on "The Future of Ranching in the West" will be held May 29 at 3:30 p.m. in the Boulder Public Library Auditorium, followed by a barbecue and square dance.

The event is co-sponsored by the Center of the American West at the University of Colorado at Boulder and the Boulder Public Library Foundation. The panel discussion and square dance are free and open to the public.

The panelists are:

oMel Coleman, president and founder, Coleman Natural Beef

oBetty Shawcroft, former president, Colorado Cattlewomen

May 21, 1998

Theresa Hernandez, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Colorado at Boulder, is one of 16 people in the nation selected to participate in a special two-year national security program.

The Defense Science Study Group is designed to inform outstanding scientists in their early careers about technical aspects of national security issues, especially in fields that have not traditionally been associated with critical defense needs. It is run by the Institute for Defense Analyses for the U.S. Department of Defense.

May 21, 1998

The sounds of music -- how they are created and the rules of physics they follow -- will be the subject of the May 30 CU Wizards science show for children to be held at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Physics Professor Jim Faller will use a group of homemade instruments to demonstrate various aspects of "The Physics of Music." The instruments will be constructed from a wide range of materials including bamboo, garden hose, plastic pipe, redwood, funnels and doorknobs.

May 20, 1998

The University of Colorado at Boulder has been selected by NASA as one of 11 initial members of the space agency's new Astrobiology Institute that will focus on interdisciplinary research regarding life in the universe.

The 11 academic and research institutions were selected from 53 proposals submitted to NASA. CU-Boulder's new Center for Astrobiology, which will be headquartered at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics under the direction of LASP Research Associate Bruce Jakosky, will be funded by a five-year, $3 million NASA grant.

May 20, 1998

The Child Learning Center in the department of speech, language and hearing sciences at CU-Boulder has completed construction of a new classroom loft donated by the Flatirons Kiwanis Club in Boulder.

In 1996 the Flatirons and the Foothills Kiwanis Clubs merged and the Flatirons club donated its remaining funds to build the loft in the Child Leaning Center. The loft is in memory of Everett Luce and Les Grote, two former Flatirons Kiwanians who volunteered much of their time and energy to the children at the center.

May 19, 1998

Excavations of a Pueblo site in the Four Corners region linked to the Chaco culture that once dominated the Southwest indicate the site was still occupied well after the collapse of the ancient empire about 1125.

May 19, 1998

* The Bluff Great House excavation is a cooperative project involving CU-Boulder, the Southwest Heritage Foundation and Abajo Archaeology, a private contract firm in Bluff. The foundation was begun in June 1994 when Indianapolis businessman Skip Lange purchased the land from a local Bluff resident specifically to support the great house excavations and preservation of the archaeological site. The foundation is a non-profit corporation and contributions are tax-deductible. The National Geographic Society has provided the primary research funding during the past two summers.

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