CU-Boulder ranked No. 1 for Peace Corps volunteers for second straight year

For the second straight year, the University of Colorado Boulder is ranked No. 1 in the nation for graduates serving as Peace Corps volunteers with 112 undergraduate alumni currently serving around the world, the Peace Corps announced today.

CU-Boulder is ranked the No. 5 all-time school for volunteers with 2,317 alumni who have served in the Peace Corps since it was established in 1961.

“For the second year in a row, CU-Boulder has produced more Peace Corps volunteers than any other university in the nation,” said Peace Corps Director Aaron S. Williams. “CU fosters civic engagement and participation, and students graduate from CU with the language and cross-cultural skills necessary to make them successful during their 27 months of Peace Corps service.”

The University of Washington ranked No. 2 for large schools this year with 110 undergraduate alumni serving. Also in the top five, in descending order, were the University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Florida and the University of Michigan.

“Our No. 1 Peace Corps ranking for volunteer service is tangible evidence of something we have always known: Our students and graduates are service-oriented and down-to-earth, working tirelessly to benefit communities around the globe,” said Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano. “It emphasizes how CU-Boulder’s civically engaged students go on to become service-oriented citizens at home and abroad.”

The Peace Corps ranks its top volunteer-producing schools annually according to the size of the student body. Large schools have more than 15,000 undergraduates, medium-sized schools have between 5,000 and 15,000 undergraduates, and small schools have fewer than 5,000 undergraduates. The George Washington University ranked first among medium-sized schools with 78 undergraduate alumni currently serving and the University of Mary Washington ranked highest among small schools with 29 undergraduate alumni serving. The University of Florida ranked as the top producing school for graduate school alumni volunteers with 30.

Each year since 2004, CU-Boulder has ranked in the top three schools in the nation for Peace Corps volunteers -- three times as the No. 2 school and four times at No. 3.

“We have a track record of attracting adventurous students who also have a hunger to serve, particularly in underdeveloped nations,” said Peter Simons, director of CU-Boulder’s Institute for Ethical and Civic Engagement.

In 2010, CU-Boulder became part of the Peace Corps Master’s International program, which allows volunteers to combine Peace Corps service with a master’s degree program and receive credit for their Peace Corps service abroad.

For more information about the Peace Corps at CU-Boulder, call the campus recruiting office at 303-492-8454 or visit http://www.colorado.edu/iece/peacecorps/.

 

FACT SHEET

CU-Boulder Peace Corps Volunteers

-- CU-Boulder is ranked No. 1 in the nation for graduates serving as Peace Corps volunteers with 112 undergraduate alumni currently serving.

-- CU-Boulder is ranked the No. 5 all-time school for volunteers with 2,317 alumni who have served in the Peace Corps since it was established in 1961.

-- Each year since 2004, CU-Boulder has ranked in the top three schools in the nation for Peace Corps volunteers -- two times as the No. 1 school, three times as the No. 2 school and four times at No. 3.

-- The Peace Corps is one of 12 campus programs overseen by CU-Boulder’s Institute for Ethical and Civic Engagement.

-- The CU-Boulder academic experience stresses rigorous coursework and hands-on research opportunities, enabling undergraduate and graduate students to put their knowledge to use through a variety of critical thinking, leadership development and service-learning opportunities.

-- CU-Boulder is one of a select group of public and private universities nationwide participating in the Peace Corps Master’s International program.

Contact:
Peter Simons, 303-492-1962
Greg Swenson, CU media relations, 303-492-3113

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