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Kenly Brown, who's notion of research has expanded since attending CU-Boulder, says faculty have helped set her up for real-word applications.

University of Colorado Boulder Anthropologist Payson Sheets and his team of students from CU-Boulder are excavating a Maya village in El Salvador buried by a volcanic eruption 1,400 years ago

Jim Voss,  a 1974 CU-Boulder Aerospace Engineering graduate, and NASA astronaut from 1984-2003, is now teaching in CU-Boulder's Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department, College of Engineering and Applied Science. He talks about the space shuttle era.

As the nation recognizes the 150th anniversary of the Civil War’s start, public interest has been rekindled in the war and the numerous memorials and monuments marking historic figures, sites and battlegrounds in states around the nation.

South Carolina militiamen fired the first shots of the Civil War at Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861, and over the next four years more than 10,000 military engagements between the North and South took place. In the end more than 600,000 soldiers died.

Shane Baldauf, winner of both a Boettcher scholarship and a Udall scholarship, has dedicated his time as a CU-Boulder student to Habitat for Humanity and starting a company that integrates LEED building standards into construction sites.

Stan Brakhage loved poetry and befriended poets but dubbed himself a failed poet. Many experts disagreed. He was, they said, a consummate poet -- one who spoke in the language of film and measured his meter in frames.

"I would say his greatest achievement is he really wrenched film into modernism. He transferred the idea of expression in cinema from actors depicting emotions – from third person filmmaking to essentially first person filmmaking.

Up to two-thirds of Earth’s permafrost likely will disappear within the next two hundred years because of warming temperature, unleashing vast quantities of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere says a new study by CU-Boulder’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences.

During the holidays, no matter how you celebrate or what your beliefs, music is almost always an important part of the celebration, according to Thomas Riis, a musicologist and director of the American Music Research Center in the University of Colorado Boulder's College of Music.
 

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