Pushing the boundaries of ultracold physics

Physicists at JILA on the CU-Boulder campus have for the first time observed chemical reactions near absolute zero, demonstrating that chemistry is possible at ultralow temperatures and that reaction rates can be controlled using quantum mechanics, the peculiar rules of submicroscopic physics.

The new results and techniques will help scientists understand previously unknown aspects of how molecules interact, a key to advancing biology, creating new materials, producing energy, and other research areas. The new JILA work also will aid studies of quantumandmacroscopic worlds. It may provide practical tools for “designer chemistry” and other applications such as precision measurements and quantum computing.

JILA is a joint institute of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and CU-Boulder. A NIST theorist at the Joint Quantum Institute, a collaborative venture of NIST and the University of Maryland, also contributed to the research.

“It’s perfectly reasonable to expect that when you go to the ultracold regime there would be no chemistry to speak of,“ said NIST physicist and CU-Boulder adjoint professor Deborah Jin, leader of one JILA group involved in the experiments. “This paper says no, there’s a lot of chemistry going on.”

Ultracold molecules are a hot research area because they may offer more diverse insights and applications than ultracold atoms, which scientists have deftly manipulated for more than 20 years. The JILA team produced a highly dense molecular gas and found that, although molecules move slowly at ultralow temperatures, reactions can occur very quickly. However, reactions can be suppressed using quantum mechanics.

“We are observing a new fundamental aspect of chemistry—it gives us a new ‘knob’ to understand and control reactions,” added NIST physicist and CU-Boulder adjoint professor Jun Ye, leader of the second JILA group involved in the research.

Give FeedbackSee More Photos View Photo