Ryan K. Bachtell

Psychology and Neuroscience; Member of the Center for Neuroscience

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Campus Box 345
Muenzinger D446C
University of Colorado at Boulder
Boulder, CO 80309-345

email: Ryan.Bachtell@colorado.edu
Phone: 303-735-1012
FAX: 303-492-2967
Website: http://psych.colorado.edu/~bachtell/

Dr. Bachtell received his Ph.D. in Behavioral Neuroscience from Oregon Health & Science University in 2004. He then moved to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas where he was a post-doctoral fellow and instructor in the Department of Psychiatry until 2008. He has since joined the faculty in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of Colorado at Boulder.
The primary research focus of the Bachtell lab is the neurobiology of drug addiction. Drugs of abuse cause several perturbations in the brain that contribute to compulsive drug taking and relapse during periods of abstinence. Studies in the lab utilize behavioral models of addiction such as drug self-administration and place conditioning coupled with biochemical measures to understand the contribution of drug-induced neurobiological changes on addictive behavior.

Selected Publications:

Bachtell, RK & Self, DW (2008). Renewed cocaine exposure produces transient alterations in nucleus accumbens AMPA receptor-mediated behavior. Journal of Neuroscience, 28(48), 12808-14.

Bachtell, RK, Choi, K-H, Monteggia, L, Neve, RL, Self, DW (2008). Role of GluR1 expression in nucleus accumbens neurons in cocaine sensitization and cocaine-seeking behavior. European Journal of Neuroscience, 27(9), 2229-40.

Graham, DL, Edwards, S, Bachtell, RK, DiLeone, RJ, Rios, M and Self DW (2007). Dynamic BDNF regulation in nucleus accumbens during cocaine use leads to increased self-administration and relapse. Nature Neuroscience, 10(8), 1029-1037.

Bachtell, RK, Whisler, K, Karanian, D and Self, DW (2005) Effects of intra-nucleus accumbens administration of dopamine agonists and antagonists on cocaine-taking and -seeking behaviors. Psychopharmacology, 183(1), 41-53.