GWC Past Events

Celebrating the Great Law: The Wilderness Act at 50

September 4th and 5th, 2014

On September 3, 2014, the National Wilderness Preservation System—established and protected by the Wilderness Act of 1964—celebrates its 50th anniversary.  We are gathering on September 4th and 5th to celebrate Wilderness—“ornery old wilderness, scratchy, sweaty, and distant, but sacred every step of the way”—and to commemorate the great law so central to its protection. 

This is not an ordinary conference, full of dry presentations or heated policy debates.  Instead, this will be a full-throated love song to wild country.  We have brought together some of the most inspiring, insightful, and compelling Wilderness luminaries:  writers, storytellers, advocates, historians, educators, photographers, and other admirers. The most important invitee of all will be the public—those who make wilderness an important part of their lives, and those who simply take comfort in its existence.

Our goal will be to tell the story of the Wilderness movement over the course of the last 50 years, to rearticulate the ethos of the Wilderness community in light of that history, and to take a short moment to reflect on and appreciate the progress that has been made.  On Thursday evening, we begin with a Wilderness talk and slide show by nationally-renowned landscape photographer John Fielder.  On Friday, the celebration continues with a series of talks, vignettes, panels, readings, and poems.  We’ll hear from some of the early activists who helped to found the Wilderness movement, and from some of the young people who will carry it forward. 

In the end, we hope to leave with a fresh appreciation for the Wilderness and the great law enacted to protect it, and a renewed determination to continue to fight to preserve and enhance one of our most precious and sacred assets.

Event Program

Event Video

 
The 35th annual Martz Summer Conference
Water and Air Quality Issues in Oil and Gas Development:
The Evolving Framework of Regulation and Management

June 4th and 5th, 2014

Technological advances for extracting oil and gas from shale deposits have ushered in a new era of energy development in key resource-rich pockets throughout the US.  In this event, we review the ongoing efforts of governments and industry to develop the regulatory and management practices necessary to protect water and air resources, drawing on the latest scientific research to tackle areas of uncertainty and to inform future action.

Event Agenda PDF

Conference Video

Speaker Powerpoint Presentations Day One

Speaker Powerpoint Presentations Day Two

Poster Session Content


 The Inaugural Getches-Wilkinson Center Distinguished Lecture

                                                    Bruce Babbitt
“Are Colorado Public Lands Becoming a Sacrifice Zone for Oil and Gas?”
 
Monday, March 17th, 2014
Wittemyer Courtroom, Wolf Law Building, Boulder, CO

Bruce Babbitt is a lifelong environmentalist and outdoorsman. Babbitt served as Arizona Governor from 1976-1987, successfully securing several wilderness designations. As Secretary of the Interior during the Clinton Administration, Babbitt launched a new era in wildlife protection by reintroducing wolves into Yellowstone National Park. Later, he reintroduced the California Condor to the Grand Canyon region. Babbitt also spearheaded Clinton’s ambitious program to protect expansive areas of federal lands as national monuments under the Antiquities Act. Clinton created 20 new monuments and expanded three existing monuments totaling nearly 8 million acres. The creation of these monuments protected some of the most contested and magnificent western landscapes, and this era stands as one of the highest points in conservation history.

The 2014 Martz Winter Symposium: Natural Resource Industries and the Sustainability Challenge
February 27-28, 2014
Wittemyer Courtroom, Wolf Law Building, Boulder, CO 

For more than two decades, sustainability has gained currency as a broad organizing principle for efforts to develop and use energy, natural resources, and the environment in ways that allow society to meet its needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. More recently, sustainability has been embraced by businesses across multiple sectors as part of a broader movement of corporate social responsibility. Hardly a day goes by without news of another corporate initiative on sustainability. Much of the enthusiasm for sustainability in the business community has been centered in “new economy” sectors and among retail giants such as Wal-Mart. Much of it has likewise been motivated by the realization that companies can actually save money by embracing more sustainable practices. 

In the traditional natural resources industries, there is an increasing recognition of the considerable challenges facing efforts to operationalize this broad concept in the context of resource extraction and development.  In the long run, the promise of sustainability will depend on the natural resource industries—those that provide energy, water, fiber, and raw materials for a growing population—translating this concept into action. 

This conference will draw together people from different disciplines and backgrounds to discuss the specific challenges confronting efforts to operationalize sustainability in the context of natural resource industries broadly understood. The symposium will discuss the idea of sustainability and how it is taking shape in particular places and sectors; rigorously explore current efforts to re-organize certain business practices under the rubric of sustainability; and endeavor to identify practical, meaningful actions to deepen ongoing efforts to make sustainability a central tenet of our economic, social, and environmental future. 

 
Energy Innovation Series and 6th Annual Schultz Lecture: Tony Clark, Commissioner, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
Tuesday, October 22, 2013
5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Wittemyer Courtroom, Wolf Law Building, Boulder, CO

The University of Colorado Law School and Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship present Tony Clark as our featured speaker for the Energy Innovation Series and the 6th Annual Schultz Lecture. Transitioning to a sustainable low-carbon energy system poses one of the great challenges of the 21st century. The Energy Innovation speaker series brings leaders from government, law, finance, industry, and academia to discuss key aspects of this challenge and some of the innovative approaches and solutions being fashioned across a range of sectors. The Schultz Lectureship Series on oil and gas, energy, and natural resources provides valuable information to policymakers, practitioners, business executives, and the academic community on emerging issues in the field. The lectureship fund was made possible by the generosity of John H. and Cynthia H. Schultz.

 

WATER, OIL AND GAS - Recycling and Reuse of Water
Tuesday, June 11, 2013 - 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
CBA-CLE Classroom, Denver, CO

Co-sponsored with the Colorado Bar Association, this workshop is the second in a 3-part series and will cover the following topics:

  • The technology behind recycling produced water and hydraulic fracturing flowback fluid
  • Mandatory recycling:  proposal and difficulties
  • Water resuse:  legal constraints and opportunities in Colorado

For more detailed information and registration information, click here

 

CLYDE MARTZ SUMMER CONFERENCE :: August 15-16, 2013

Arizona v. California at 50: The Legacy and Future of
Governance, Reserved Rights, and Water Transfers

The 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court's historic decision in Arizona v. California
arrives next summer. While the case was an important landmark in the still-evolving
relationship between these two Lower Basin states, it remains most salient today by
the way it codified federal rights and responsibilities, especially in the areas of federal
(including tribal) reserved rights, the role of the Interior Secretary in Lower Basin water
management, and the ability of Congress to allocate/reallocate water. It also modified
the Upper Basin/Lower Basin relationship in important ways, especially regarding
the treatment of Lower Basin tributaries. Moving forward, several types of potential
management innovations in areas such as governance and water transfers will hinge on
the framework outlined, in part, by this decision.

Please join fellow water professionals and members of the public in a discussion
of these legal and policy issues at the annual Clyde Martz Summer Conference at
the University of Colorado School of Law on August 15th and 16th, 2013, in Boulder,
Colorado.

Speakers:

Thursday, August 15th:
Larry MacDonnell, Professor, Colorado Law
Robert Glennon, Professor, University of Arizona
Sandy Fabritz-Whitney, Director, Arizona Dept. of Water Resources
Jeff Kightlinger, General Manager, MWD of Southern California
Jim Lochhead, CEO/Manager, Denver Water
Susan Nevelow Mart, Library Director, Colorado Law
Bret Birdsong, Professor, University of Nevada-Las Vegas
Amy Cordalis, Attorney, Native American Rights Fund
Michael Gheleta, Attorney, Office of the Solicitor, DOI
Sarah Krakoff, Professor, Colorado Law
Barton "Buzz" Thompson, Professor, Stanford University
Bob Johnson, Water Consult (former Reclamation Commissioner)
Anne Castle, Asst. Secretary for Water & Science, DOI

Friday, August 16th:
Brad Udall, Director, Getches-Wilkinson Center
Pat Mulroy, General Manager, Southern Nevada Water Authority
Barton "Buzz" Thompson, Professor, Stanford University
Jeff Kightlinger, General Manager, MWD of Southern California
Eric Kuhn, GM, Colorado River Water Conservation District
Julie Nania, Getches-Wyss Fellow, Getches-Wilkinson Center
Bob Snow, Attorney, Office of the Solicitor, DOI
Herb Becker, Attorney, JA Associates
Jennifer Pitt, Director, Colorado River Project, EDF
Bob Johnson, Water Consult
Jack Schmidt, Chief USGS Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center
Jason Robison, Professor, University of Wyoming
Sandy Fabritz-Whitney, Director, Arizona Dept. of Water Resources
Jim Lochhead, CEO/Manager, Denver Water
Guy Martin, Partner, Perkins Coie (Washington, D.C.)
Tanja Trujillo, Exec. Director, Colorado River Board of California

For more information, e-mail gwc@colorado.edu or call 303-492-1286.

 

Past Events:

Click here for a list of past conferences and events (pdf).

 

 

 

Past Event

August 15-16, 2013
Wolf Law Building
Boulder, Colorado

Arizona v. California at 50: The Legacy and Future of Governance, Reserved Rights, and Water Transfers

The Colorado River is an economic, environmental and cultural lifeline of the southwestern United States, and the allocation of its scarce waters are a source of ongoing controversy. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision in Arizona v. California. While the case was an important landmark in the still-evolving relationship between these two Lower Basin states, it remains most relevant today by the way in which it clarified federal rights and responsibilities. This is especially true in the areas of federal (including tribal) reserved rights, the role of the Interior Secretary in Lower Basin water management, and the ability of Congress to allocate/reallocate water. It also modified the Upper Basin/Lower Basin relationship in important ways, especially in the treatment of Lower Basin tributaries. Moving forward, several types of potential management innovations—in areas such as governance and water transfers—will hinge on the framework outlined by this decision.

Thursday, August 15, 2013

8:30 a.m. Arrival - coffee, tea, and beverages
9:00 - 9:15 a.m.

Introductions and Welcome
Phil Weiser, Dean, Colorado Law
Brad Udall, Director, Getches-Wilkinson Center

Session I: The Decision and Its Consequences: Then and Now
Moderator - Mark Squillace

9:15 - 10:00 a.m. Arizona v. California: An Overview
Larry MacDonnell, Professor, Colorado Law
10:00 - 10:45 a.m. To the Victor Goes the Spoils? Implications for Arizona and the Lower Basin
Robert Glennon, Professor, University of Arizona
10:45 - 11:15 a.m. Break
11:15 - 12:00 p.m. Respondents
Sandy Fabritz-Whitney, Director, Arizona Dept. of Water Resources
Jeff Kightlinger, General Manager, MWD of Southern California
Jim Lochhead, CEO/Manager, Denver Water
12:00 - 1:00 p.m. Lunch in the Courtyard (provided)
1:00 - 1:10 p.m. The Arizona v. California Digital Archive
Susan Nevelow Mart, Library Director, Colorado Law

Session II: Consequences for the Federal Role
Moderator - Charles Wilkinson

1:15 - 1:45 p.m. Recognition of Federal Reserved Rights
Bret Birdsong, Professor, University of Nevada-Las Vegas
1:45 - 2:15 p.m. Tribal Reserved Rights and Settlements in the CRB
Amy Cordalis, Attorney, Native American Rights Fund
2:15 - 2:45 p.m. Respondents
Michael Gheleta, Attorney, Office of the Solicitor, DOI (invited)
Sarah Krakoff, Professor, Colorado Law
3:15 - 3:45 p.m. Allocating Interstate Rivers after Arizona v. California
Barton “Buzz” Thompson, Professor, Stanford University
3:45 - 4:15 p.m. SOI as Watermaster: Decision Making in the Lower Basin
Bob Johnson, Water Consult (former Reclamation Commissioner)
4:15 - 4:45 p.m. Respondents
Anne Castle, Asst. Secretary for Water & Science, DOI
Others TBD

Evening Reception

4:45 - 7 p.m. Please join us for an evening reception in the Wolf Law Building Courtyard

Friday, August 16, 2013

Session III: Looking Forward
Moderator - Doug Kenney

8:00 - 8:30 a.m. Setting the Stage: Moving Beyond the Basin Study
Brad Udall, Director, Getches-Wilkinson Center
8:30 - 9:00 a.m. Interim Guidelines (and What Happens Below 1025’)
Pat Mulroy, General Manager, Southern Nevada Water Authority
9:00 - 9:20 a.m. Respondent
Barton “Buzz” Thompson, Professor, Stanford University
9:20 - 9:50 a.m. The (Ongoing) Evolution of Lower Basin Water Banking
Jeff Kightlinger, General Manager, MWD of Southern California
9:50 - 10:20 a.m. Next Up: Upper Basin Water Banks
Eric Kuhn, GM, Colorado River Water Conservation District
10:20 - 10:50 a.m. Break
10:50 - 11:20 a.m. New Uses for Tribal Water
Julie Nania, Getches-Wyss Fellow, Getches-Wilkinson Center
11:20 - 11:50 a.m. Mexico and Minute 319: What’s Up and What’s Next?
Bob Snow, Attorney, Office of the Solicitor, DOI
11:50 - 12:20 p.m. Respondents
Herb Becker, Attorney, JA Associates
Barton “Buzz” Thompson, Professor, Stanford University
Jennifer Pitt, Director, Colorado River Project, EDF
12:20 - 1:30 p.m. Lunch (local restaurants -- you choose)
1:30 - 2:00 p.m. Restoring the Health of the River
Jack Schmidt, Chief USGS Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center
2:00 - 2:30 p.m. Reckoning Arizona v. California with the Colorado River Compact
Jason Robison, Professor, University of Wyoming
2:30 - 4:00 p.m. Tying it All Together: Final Observations
Sandy Fabritz-Whitney, Director, Arizona Dept. of Water Resources
Eric Kuhn, GM, Colorado River Water Conservation District
Jim Lochhead, CEO/Manager, Denver Water
Guy Martin, Partner, Perkins Coie (Washington, D.C.)
Pat Mulroy, General Manager, Southern Nevada Water Authority
Tanja Trujillo, Exec. Director, Colorado River Board of California

Cost:

Register through July 15, 2013 for a 20% discount

$320 General
$240 Government
$160 Academic/Non-profit
$ 20 Student

Registration price after July 15, 2013

$400 General
$300 Government
$200 Academic/Non-profit
$ 25 Student

Additional Fees:

$50 CLE Credit, General Credits
$20 On Campus Parking Permit

Travel:

Nearest major airport is Denver International Airport (DIA), about 45 minutes from Boulder. Taxis, shuttle and rental cars are available at DIA airport.

Ground Transportation:

Public transportation is available through RTD SkyRide, Bus AB; cost is $24/round trip or $13 one way.