American Indian Law Clinic to host Boarding School Healing Symposium

May 12, 2011

Boulder, Colo. – Representatives from the Boarding School Healing Project, Native American Rights Fund, American Indian Law Clinic at the University of Colorado Law School, and Human Rights Clinic at the University of Wyoming will convene on May 14-15, 2011 in Boulder, Colo. for a “Boarding School Healing Symposium.”

Hosted by the American Indian Law Clinic at Colorado Law, the Symposium is being held in order to discuss and craft a national strategy to achieve both national recognition of and an apology for the wrongs visited upon individuals and communities of Indian Country by the U.S. boarding school policy, as well as reparations to provide the framework for healing the wounds from these historic and enduring wrongs.

The Planning Committee has invited approximately thirty individuals who have made significant contributions toward addressing the harms resulting from the American Indian Boarding School system. These individuals have expertise in a range of fields, including social/psychological, health, cultural, legislative, legal, education, and media.

“This is a historic gathering of those people and organizations which have been committed to effectuating healing for both individuals and tribal communities from this shameful legacy.  We hope through this coordinated effort and increased public awareness that we will be able to develop a plan that will be effective at both the national and local level,” said Symposium coordinator Jill Tompkins and director of the American Indian Law clinic at Colorado Law.

Although an invitation-only event, there will be a showing of the film, “A Century of Genocide” and panel discussion on Saturday, May 14 from 7 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. that is free and open to the public.

Following the symposium, the planning committee hopes to provide the framework for a national and international effort to achieve real and lasting healing for the individuals and communities that have labored under the legacy of the policies of cultural genocide visited on individual  American Indian children and their communities.  This may include, but is not limited to: future symposiums; larger conferences; legislation; and, other identified courses of action.

About University of Colorado Law School

Established in 1892, the University of Colorado Law School (www.colorado.edu/law) is a top 25 public law school located at the base of the inspiring Rocky Mountains. Colorado Law’s 500 students, selected from among the statistically best applicants in the nation, represent 100 undergraduate institutions and diverse backgrounds. The school has dual degree programs in business, environmental studies, telecommunications, and public affairs. With a low faculty-to-student ratio, its highly published faculty is dedicated to interacting with students inside and outside the classroom. The school’s 8 clinics and 4 centers focus on areas of strength, including natural resources and environmental, American Indian, juvenile and family, telecommunications policy, and sustainable energy law. Colorado Law’s graduates are leaders in their profession and committed to public interest work. 

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