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University of Colorado at Boulder

Office of the Vice Chancellor Campus Box 40

for Academic Affairs 492-5094

 

MEMORANDUM

 

To: Vice Chancellor Wallace Loh

Academic Affairs Budget Advisory Committee

From: Associate Vice Chancellor Mark Dubin, CIO

Subject: Budget Presentation

Date: March 10,1997

 

This document is the written portion of the presentation I am making in the role of Chief Information Technology Officer (CIO) and Chair of the Campus Policy Board on Information Technology (CPBIT). As you are probably aware, this position was started in AY 1996-97 and has not previously existed at UCB.

 

I am not representing any one unit and its budget, thus, this presentation is somewhat different than the others you have heard. A major intent of the CIO position and the reorganized CPBIT is to provide oversight of all Information Technology (IT) related activities on campus, and to suggest policy and actions that coordinate these IT activities.

 

I have worked with CPBIT and all major IT providers at UCB in preparing this presentation. It attempts to briefly describe and place all of the main IT activities at UCB in a single, policy-based context and demonstrate ongoing and long-term budget planning. In doing this I review the IT-related budget requests of these units (including some that do not report in Academic Affairs) and try to provide a sense of prioritization from the point of view of the CIO.

 

I hope this presentation lets you understand the key aspects of IT at UCB, the principles that guide these activities and their coordination, the way funds are spent to meet our needs and accomplish our goals, and some choices available in deciding on incremental budget allocations.

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page 1

 

t 1. The Role of the CIO and CPBIT

 

The CIO is a position relatively common in the business world and somewhat more recent in academy The responsibilities of the position vary even at institutions comparable to UCB, typically having differing amounts of technical and policy responsibilities. At UCB the role of the CIO falls towards the policy end of the spectrum. Further, the position is more one of coordination and facilitation of various IT activities than direct supervision of units with major IT responsibilities. The CIO has a leadership role in working with all campus constituencies in developing a common IT policy context for UCB, and is responsible for insuring that major IT policy and budget decisions are made in that context, not in an ad hoc manner. (The CIO reports jointly to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and to the Vice Chancellor for Administration.)

 

In carrying out these responsibilities the CIO works directly with and is the Chair of CPBIT. The membership of that group is broadly inclusive and was enlarged in AY 1996-97 to reflect its new and expanded responsibilities. Faculty, administrators, and IT users and providers are CPBIT members. Together with the CIO they provide advice to units responsible for delivery of IT services and to the Chancellor and Vice Chancellors. CPBIT carries out

 

t Abbreviations used in this document:

 

ASP - Administrative Streamlining Project

CIO - Chief Information Technology Officer

CNS/AMS - Computer and Network Services/Academic Media Services

CPBIT - Campus Policy Board on Information Technology

FTEP - Faculty Teaching Excellence Program

IT - Information Technology

ITRC - Instructional Technology Resource Center

TCS - Telecommunications Services

UMS - University Management Systems

WWW or Web - World Wide Web (usually synonymous with the Internet)

The members of CPBIT are: Teaching Faculty- Neil Ashby (Physics)

James Curry (Applied Math) Bruce Henderson Journalism)

Oliver McBryan (Computer Science) Bobby Schnabel (Computer Science)

Walt Stone (Political Science)

Others - Anne Colgan (Dean of Continuing Education)

Don Diebert (Director, Compensation Services) Ellen Glover (Publication & Marketing)

Bill Haid (Registrar) Keith Jackson (Housing Services)

Charles Johnson (Buffalo Chip/Bookstore) Ken Klingenstein (Director, CNS/AMS)

Judy Lampman (Academic Affairs) Hans Orange (Budget & Planning)

Jeff Lipton (Director, Business Services) Dave Makowski (Director, UMS)

Dennis Maloney (Director - TCS) Jim Marshall (Assoc. Director, CNS/AMS)

Tim Neese (Director, ITRC) Ric Porreca (Budget Director)

Mary Ann Shea (Director, FTEP), Jerry Sullivan (Director, Financial Aid)

Jim Williams (Dean of Libraries) Jamey Wood (UCSU student representative).

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page 2

 

most of its day-to-day work through four working groups made up of CPBIT members and additional, interested members of the UCB community. The Working Groups are:

 

Teaching, Learning and Scholarly IT Concerns

Administrative and Student-Life IT Concerns and Resources

IT Usage Policies and Procedures

. Core IT Infrastructure Providers Group

 

The CIO and CPBIT are concerned with the following UCB units and activities (listed alphabetically), as well as other IT-related issues that arise:

 

. Administrative Streamlining Project

Buffalo Chip/Bookstore

. Classroom Renovation

(reports directly to the CIO)

Communication and Network Services/Academic Media Services

(reports directly to the CIO)

Faculty Teaching Excellence Program

(dotted reporting line to the CIO)

Housing Services (Ethernet delivery to students)

Instructional Technology Resource Center

(dotted reporting line to the CIO) . Internet2 development . Libraries . Mailing Services (e-memo provision)

Publications & Marketing (Campus Web Site design)

. Telecommunications Services

(dotted reporting line to the CIO)

Student Affairs (Registrar, Financial Aid, etc.)

University Management Systems (a Central CU activity)

 

2. Policies Guiding IT at UCB

 

Many studies related to Information Technology (IT) have been completed at UCB in past 5 years. They provide a rich basis for continued planning, and for the development of IT at UCB. Turning the previous studies into action is the task before CUBIT and the CIO. To aid this endeavor the CIO prepared the CPBIT Working Paper which was responded to by all CPBIT members and revised in response to their input. The current version is appended

It is not intended that the CPBIT Working Paper needs to be read in preparation for the verbal budget presentation, as it is rather lengthy. It is provided for those who might be interested in certain of the things it deals with. There is a three page executive summary at its start.

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page 3

 

The CPBIT Working Paper builds on a schema, developed by the Higher

- Education Information Resources Alliance,t that provides a comprehensive

means of planning and evaluating with regards to IT. This set of

HEIRAlliance Guidelines is widely used by institutions comparable to UCB. It

is instructive to summarize its categories, (which are elaborated in the Table

on page 5 of the CPBIT Working Paper):

 

Academic Program Support - Academic programs are supported by appropriate electronic information resources.

 

. Administrative User Support - The institution's operations and

- management are supported by appropriate information resources.

 

Access - Electronic information resources are readily accessible by faculty, staff, and students so they may accomplish their work.

 

Extended Boundaries - The institution is moving to exploit technology to extend the traditional boundaries of the campus.

 

Institution wide Planning and IT Management - A well-developed planning process which is tied to the institutional budgeting process is in place for information resources. Advisory groups are in place.

 

Policy Structure - Usage policies are published and processes for their implementation are identified.

 

Staffing - Professional staff with appropriate expertise are available to support faculty, students, and staff to use and maintain services and facilities.

 

The CPBIT Working Paper places the goals and principles that were developed in the previous IT studies at UCB (identified on page 1 of the Working Paper) into the structure of these categories. The result is 43 current Action Items that the various Working Groups are attending to.

 

It is important to stress that the Working Paper and its Action Items present a coordinated approach to IT activities, needs and goals at UCB that guide the CIO, CPBIT and the institution.

 

Put another way, it is critical to note that at UCB various units are not simply reacting in ad hoc fashion to IT-related issues as they arise. In turn, it is the intent of the CIO and CPBIT that this lead to budget and resource allocation decisions that are made based on coordinated planning by all of the units involved. While detailed support of this assertion is contained in the 43 Action Items (collated at the end of the Working Paper) it is useful to state a few of them here by way of example of the types of issues considered:

 

t The Higher Education Information Resources Alliance is made up of the Association of Research Libraries, CAUSE—the association for managing and using information resources in higher education, and Educom—a non-profit consortium of leading colleges and universities seeking to transform education through the use of information technology.

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page 4

 

Planning and implementation of systems that provide more on-line services to students must be pursued aggressively.

 

CPBIT should work with the Dean of Libraries and the Libraries faculty advisory committee to assure planning, written policies. and procedures in support of provision of scholarly "content." This should include a budget plan that coordinates Libraries IT expenses with other Campus IT expenses.

 

The UCB administrators responsible for campus aspects of the system wide Administrative Streamlining Process should ensure that the technical and financial IT concerns of the campus are adequately understood and addressed.

 

Work with relevant Campus units to develop procedures for the enforcement of all IT usage policies.

 

Continued provision of core services should be assured and upgrades identified as they become technically feasible.

 

Assure that a campus policy exists concerning intra-building fiber, and that it is regularly reexamined in light of technical advances.

 

In addition to the Action Items in the CPBIT Working Paper, it is useful in understanding the budget analyses that follow to elaborate some highest-level principles that guide the CIO.

 

UCB has a state-of-the-art campus network and telecommunication infrastructure, and excellent services that support their use in teaching, scholarship and administration. Thus, massive resources are not needed for catch-up type efforts. Rather, it is important to identify strategic investments and reallocations that will sustain our infrastructure and services, and allow for upgrades and enhancements that keep pace with developing technologies.

 

Campus IT providers have a policy of ongoing, incremental investments and changes in response to developments in technology. This allows us to maintain our excellence without big swings in expenditures that would otherwise occur if we needed to upgrade entire system segments all at once.

 

Revenue sources and budget reallocations have been identified (as described in the remainder of this document) that will allow us to attend to our IT needs without unrealistic assumptions about the sources and amounts of needed funds in the foreseeable future.

 

There is one and only one campus wide IT infrastructure. The activities we pursue are too interrelated, and on too large a scale to separate out teaching uses, research and scholarship uses, and administrative uses of IT at UCB. It is impossible to do any of these things in a scalable and sustainable fashion without a common infrastructure, a single set of standards, and a core set of centralized support services.

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page 5

 

We are basing most of our new services on Web-access and Web-based technologies.

 

Access to and use of IT-related services is a basic, common good that must be provided to all members of the UCB community if we are to do our work and jobs in the information age. This access must be provided in as barrier free a manner as is fiscally reasonable so as not to develop groups of technology "haves" and "have-nots" at UCB.

 

We pride ourselves on being excellent implementors of the best the world has to offer. In certain limited, strategically chosen situations the interests of campus researchers and the opportunity to take a national leadership position coincide in ways that we do take advantage of.

 

3. Budget Considerations |

 

IT-related budget considerations of various units are presented in this section in an attempt to place them in the context of overall campus IT needs and policies described above. Basic prioritization of these budget requests is also given.

 

\ Technology Reinvestment Fund t

 

CPBIT and the CIO request a continuing reallocation of $500,000/year into a Technology Reinvestment Fund. This fund will be used primarily for the provision of up-to-date computers for all faculty, replaced on approximately a five year cycle. Part of the fund will be used to provide additional support services to faculty in using these computers, especially in their teaching. The fund will also be used to support the development of new Smart Classrooms.t

 

The provision of computers, as well as resources associated with their use is the single most important way of providing access to the use of new technologies in teaching and scholarship. Doing so with a campus wide pool of funds avoids the development of technology "haves" and "have-nots." Further, even those with access to other resources for the purchase of computers (such as grant funds) do not necessarily have funds for continuing upgrade/replacement or for the type of computer best able to take advantage of our Smart Classrooms.

 

t Funds for new Smart Classrooms have also been requested through the President's TLE Program. Of that proposal is chosen for submission by the Boulder Campus and then funded by the President, the Smart Classroom portion of the Technology Reinvestment fund will be reallocated among the other two items.

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page 6

 

The CPBIT Working Paper addresses these issues in the following Action Items:

 

A first priority of CPBIT is to develop a plan and budget proposal for the on-going provision of a "Web-browser" capable computer to every faculty member and to appropriate staff members. A 4-year renewal cycle should be contemplated. (#3.1)

 

Continue to increase support for the ITRC, based on assessed need. (#1.10)

 

Devise a budget plan to increase smart classrooms at least two per year, preferably at a rate of ten or more per year. (#1.6)

 

The Academic Affairs Strategic Planning Document for Information Technology (4/96) states:

 

"Every faculty member . . . should have a desktop computer with on-line access to the Internet from his or her normal work space on campus or at home. The computer should include a color screen which is adequate for providing World Wide Web access . . . maintained and upgraded as needed. Access on demand must be available 100% of the time.... Where research funding is not available (for example in many humanities departments) basic computer equipment and access should be provided to faculty . . . by UCB."

 

In support of this goal it states:

 

"IT access needs to be regarded as basic university infrastructure similar to lighting or heating—a facility that is simply always there. As such it should not be funded by individual departments or units. Tying IT access to departmental funding will continue to create a great disparity on campus between the "haves" and the "have-nots." With such universal access arranged, the path is paved for integration of IT into all academic programs. Faculty and staff access to internal databases ranging from grant records to student body profiles will greatly enhance the processes of proposal writing, expense reimbursement and grant administration. New opportunities for teaching beyond our traditional resident students will play an important role for UCB outreach. The Library, as a repository of information resources, will be enabled by IT advances to provide more selective resources with improved accessibility and responsiveness. New opportunities for electronic publishing will cover the range from research papers to on-line and interactive classes."

 

The CPBIT Working Group on Teaching, Learning and Scholarship (TLS) considered this Technology Reinvestment Fund at length and provided the CIO with the Memorandum that appears on the next page. The TLS Committee and CPBIT as a whole, working with the CIO, will continue to determine the allocation of the Technology Reinvestment Fund.

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page 7

 

MEMORANDUM

 

DATE: March 5, 1997

TO: Mark Dubin, CIO, Boulder Campus

FROM: CPBIT - TLS Subcommittee, Walt Stone (Chair),

Susan Anthes, Neil Ashby, Barbara Bintliff, Anne Colgan, John

Dunn, John Gilbert, Bruce Henderson, Mary Klages, Oliver

McBryan, Tim Neese, Bobby Schnabel, Mary Ann Shea

 

SUBJECT: Recommended Guidelines for IT Enhancements to Boulder Faculty

 

In response to your request for our recommendations about how to implement a program of enhancing IT access for the Boulder faculty, we recommend the following:

 

1. The goal of providing IT access to all faculty can best be achieved by focusing upon three broad areas:

 

(A). A laptop capable of running most currently-available software, providing Web access, and supporting in-class applications, should be given to every faculty member as part of his/her professional entitlement (like an office, phone, etc.). Because of technological development, this resource must be renewed on a continuing basis, depending upon the life-span of the machines, and available funds.

 

(B). Support must be provided to faculty both in the form of up-front training in the use of the laptop for teaching, research, and service, and in the form of continuing support as new applications are developed, problems encountered, etc.

 

(C). Classroom opportunities for using the machines in teaching must be enhanced.

 

2. Allocation of financial commitments should reflect a clear commitment to all three areas. We recommend that funds be allocated as follows:

 

(A). Laptop purchases for distribution to faculty: $300,000.

 

(B). Allocation to support faculty use of laptops: $150,000. Some of this money should be allocated to ITRC to enhance its capability (see below), and some should be set aside to create in-house assistance to units or clusters of units on a fully-funded or matching basis.

 

(C). Adding to the number of "Smart" classrooms: $50,000. We assume that media-equipped classrooms are prime targets for enhancement, and that they can be fully upgraded to "Smart" at a cost of about $10,000 per classroom.

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page 8

 

3. We plan to request a one-time allocation of $50,000 to be used to upgrade classroom access immediately. We estimate that the cost of activating Internet access in media-equipped classrooms plus providing 7 mobile display units to be shared by clusters of classrooms in reasonably close proximity will require $48,000 to $50,000. Budget details to follow. The point of this request is to enhance in a dramatic and immediate way IT classroom access to accommodate the immediate infusion of laptops in the faculty.t

 

4. We see the ITRC, in collaboration with CNS, as a crucial instrument for providing faculty support. Therefore, we recommend that it be put o n permanent and secure funding, and that it be enhanced through this program. That is, some portion of the funds allocated to faculty support should be lodged in ITRC to enhance its ability to provide such support. A more detailed proposal follows. Further, we support the ongoing discussions among ITRC, FTEP, and CNS to sort out the respective roles of these three units.

 

5. We suggest the program be structured to leverage as much additional support from other sources as possible, and to create incentives for individual faculty and units to buy into increased use of IT in teaching and research. W e suggest that funds be allocated into two pots, one for direct funding to faculty and units judged to be most in need, and least able to generate additional funds from outside sources. The second pot will be for stimulating matching funds from individual faculty or units. Matching funds pots should be created for all three areas of focus: laptop acquisition, support, and classroom enhancement. In the early years of the program, we recommend a split between direct funding and matching funds weighted heavily to the direct side (75:25), gradually moving the ratio to greater balance between the two (50:50)

 

6. Implementation of the program should be carefully monitored by the CIO and CPBIT to determine whether allocations should be shifted across areas as the program develops, what the appropriate balance between direct and matched funds is, and whether additional issues should be addressed. In keeping with this recommendation, CPBIT should conduct a thorough evaluation of the program at the conclusion of its first year.

 

7. The Committee requests that you report to it on the progress and status of the IT allocation this spring as developments in the budgetary allocation process warrant.

 

t [Note from the CIO: This is being requested from President's Fund monies, allocated for faculty use of technology, that are presently in the CIO AY 96-97 budget.]

CIO/CPBIT Bridget Presentation page 9

 

| CNS/AMS

 

CNS/AMS has requested $200,000 in new, one-time funds to support the development of a new Service Center in order to improve and increase services to its users, and to capture the cost data associated with services so that charging, where appropriate, can be implemented.

 

The Service Center is an essential tool to provide excellent customer service in an era of increasing demands without the need for large numbers of additional staff. The $200,000 will be used entirely to fund the development of software that will be used in its operation.

 

With this tool, resources can be significantly extended. It provides CNS/AMS with the technology to coordinate services through a single point and to package services for ease of use by clients. With the Service Center, there will be a single process for requesting services, with ensuing economies.

 

New charging mechanisms cannot be instituted without data. It should be obvious that we can not charge for services unless we can rationalize the charges and ensure that prices bear a reasonable relationship to costs. The way to determine those costs is to establish a mechanism to track the efforts of CNS/AMS staff in the many services and products they offer. To summarize, to enable CNS/AMS to provide defensible charges for services, a Service Center must be in place to provide the cost accounting data needed. The same data will also be used for continuous internal improvement processes.

 

Why can't CNS/AMS pay for development of the Service Center from its $7 million budget? They are offering to finance over $175,000/year of the ongoing cost of the Center by reallocating funds. Their budget presentation also demonstrated other reallocations and cuts that are being made. A further $200,000 (one-time) reallocation could not be identified.

 

Could some or all of the $200,000 come from CNS/AMS charging for services that are now provided for free? A charge for a service in a closed economic system like the university is essentially a transfer tax. Any such tax should be fair and easily understood by those who must pay it. The underlying philosophical basis for not charging for certain IT services at UCB has been to encourage the use of particular ways to accomplish things in the interest of overall efficiency and effectiveness. In establishing any new cost recovery mechanisms we must ensure that:

 

the true costs to the institution for users avoiding use of a service is not greater than the cost of the service itself, and that charges can be implemented without significant reduction in the service,

 

the mechanisms for billing and receiving funds do not dominate the cost of the delivered service,

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page 10

 

there is an effective enforcement procedure that precludes users from otherwise "getting around" the charges,

 

the "billable" goods/services have a clear relationship to the goods actually used or consumed, and the marginal cost of the goods/services is not effectively zero.

 

Cost recovery is appropriate when auxiliary services are using the service or product, when it can be used to educate or appropriately reduce demand, and/or when users are external to UCB. On the other hand, subsidies are useful when:

 

users have lower-cost alternatives if charges are introduced, that will have severe negative impact on the common good,

 

users do not have sufficient funds to cover the cost of service and there is clear cross-institutional or programmatic value to wide utilization of the service,

 

a service is just beginning and needs to establish a critical mass of users (i.e., a service that becomes more valuable to all of us when more people have the service, such as telephone start-ups),

 

one service can result in more effective use of another service for everyone.

 

Almost all of CNS/AMS services theoretically can be charged for. However, some services should remain free based on the above criteria. For example:

 

Network connectivity costs are not charged per bit, as there is no effective way to do so. They are charged per port, but heavily subsidized by general fund because users have lower-cost alternatives with severe negative impact on the network commons (such as providing their own wiring in non-standard fashion).

 

Unix-Operations support of departmental computing are somewhat subsidized because users have options whose costs are perceived as lower with the potential for widespread network damage.

 

Printing is not charged for in student computer labs because all currently available mechanisms for billing and receiving funds dominate the cost of the delivered service and can only be implemented with a reduction of service, that is closing printing in some labs that operate without a staff person present.

 

BugBusters are not charged for because the true costs to the institution for users avoiding use of them to some degree appear to be greater than the cost of the service itself.

 

There are likely areas where cost recovery can be instituted or expanded, either through programmatic directive or new technological alternatives. Some cost recovery mechanisms will require strong institutional policy and effective enforcement processes. Moreover, developing the cost accounting

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page 11

 

data needed to institute cost recovery requires the new Service Center in the first place. Examples of possible new charges are:

 

Printing in student computing labs: Lab supplies related to printing currently cost about $198,000/year. We could charge for this printing, though with a clear reduction of service. Further, the technology to do this cost-effectively is at least a year off.

 

Student advising on computer usage: ($255,000/year). It seems feasible but ill-advised to charge for this, given the clientele and mission of the institution.

 

BugBusters: ($231,000/year, all users). We should consider charging auxiliary users for this service.

 

E-mail and Web Support: ($800,000/year both direct and infrastructure costs). It has been suggested that we charge auxiliaries for this service. There are a number of difficult and arbitrary issues here, most notably the metering of services and the cost of administration of a fee structure

 

Form Scanning Services: ($73,000, provided to general fund users only.) We might provide a certain amount for "free" so as not to inconvenience individual faculty, and then charge for further amounts of service.

 

Network connectivity: CNS currently recovers no cost in this area. (The current monthly fee goes to Telecommunications Services.) Given repeated expressions that the current fee is too high, and the critical nature of a network connection to all campus activities, it would be difficult for CNS to cost recover here by implementing higher charges.

 

CNS/AMS is encouraging CPBIT and other appropriate campus policy groups to recommend broad principles for cost recovery of CNS/AMS services. CNS/AMS management will then proceed to analyze individual services relative to such principles and do formal cost studies for those service that meet cost recovery guidelines. Mechanisms will be developed for charging and users informed of the charging plans. Given the work involved, as well as the need for those being charged to plan for the budgetary impact, it is not likely that significant new charges can be instituted before July 1, 1998.

 

TCS

 

Telecommunication Services is an auxiliary that is entirely self funded (as opposed to receiving any allocation from the General Fund). In fact, it is a

 

The issue of charging auxiliaries is complicated by the GAR. If any relevant costs that CNS/AMS incurs are not included in the GAR, they certainly could be. However, the revenue generated from GAR goes to a central pot. So, unless there were an arrangement to ensure that CNS/AMS received their part of increased GAR charges, this would not help their budget situation. Further, for any costs included in the GAR, auxiliary users could rightly argue that they are already paying for these services and should not be charged any fee in addition.

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page l2

 

provider of technology reinvestment funds from the revenues it receives for its services; approximately $2 million/year from the TCS budget is used to upgrade campus telecommunications infrastructure. Thus, it is important to look at these TCS reinvestments as a part of the overall IT budgetary picture.

 

It is critical to realize that TCS does significantly more than provide the basic telephone service that we are all familiar with. All of the twisted-pair copper wiring and optical fiber infrastructure is provided and maintained by TCS. Thus, its services complement those of CNS/AMS in being the basis of the entire campus communications and digital information network—the fundamental underpinning of campus IT.

 

The TCS budget is based on very detailed five year strategic and funding plans that are regularly updated. It is illustrative to look at the AY 96-97 TCS plant

fund expenditures (from revenues) of approximately $2,288,000 to see how its revenues support campus IT activities:

 

Data Communications Fund - optical fiber/network support $ 275,000.

Fiber Expansion - optical fiber between buildings $ 430,000.

Internal Building Cable Expansion $ 110,000.

External Cable Expansion $ 190,000.

Telephone System Expansion $ 900,000.

ISN Maintenance $73,000.

Equipment Replacement $ 135,000.

Disaster Prevention/Recovery $ 50,000.

. Other $125,000.

 

Revenues come from the basic telephone and jack charges and provision of long-distance service. Similar expenditures are expected in AY 97-98.

 

Could TCS revenues be increased by raising rates? The bulk of all TCS income comes from recharges to other campus units. Thus, raising basic telephone or jack rates is an indirect way of taxing a large number of accounts to generate

more funds for IT. More direct and obvious fee-for-service methods seem

preferable. TCS has about $2.8 million/year in revenues for provision of long distance services (i.e., charging for calls). Of that sum, 60% comes from the

residence halls and 40% from faculty and administrative long distance calls. Thus, rate increases are another indirect tax on faculty and administrative

accounts and also can drive down residence hall revenues by causing students to switch to other ways of making their calls (i.e., calling cards). These rates

are set yearly by a group including representatives from TCS, Business

Services (and now the CIO), who analyze the factors involved and make a recommendation to the Vice Chancellors and Chancellor, late in the Spring semester. At this point in time, significant increases would be a departure from recent past practice. Further, there are technical and legal issues that arise from the fact that TCS is a Service Center included in Indirect Cost rates that mitigate against arbitrary increases.

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation Cagey

 

How much, if any of the TCS plant funds could be redirected to other IT infrastructure uses? In past years these expenditures were prioritized by TCS with input from CNS/AMS and the Director of Business Services. There is no doubt they have gone towards necessary and important needs. This year, there is even closer collaboration between TCS and CNS/AMS, with participation from the CIO, that will ensure that all campus IT infrastructure needs are carefully weighed and prioritized. Thus, there may be some strategic internal reallocations.

 

In the long run, an expected change in the TCS budget will provide significant revenues for expansion of the campus IT infrastructure. Now, $1,550,000/year is paid as debt service for the bonds that financed the upgrade of campus telecommunication services about 10 years ago. AY 2000-01 is the last year of this payment. Thus, in AY 01-02 about $1.5 million will be available for new IT infrastructure uses. While it is hard to predict the nature of technological changes, it is certain there will be needs based on expanded use, new opportunities, and obsolescence of current equipment. Significant long-term planning by all relevant campus entities will be directed at this situation, facilitated by the CIO.

 

Finally, it is important to stress that a closer relationship has developed between TCS and CNS/AMS. For many years each informed and worked with the other in many relevant ways. Starting in AY 96-97, under the guidance of the CIO, a more integrated approach has been taken. Many of the overlapping and obviously related functions of the two units are being functionally merged. Examples of this are:

 

Process improvement teams with members from CNS/AMS and TCS conducted campus wide focus groups about needs for joint services.

 

The CNS/AMS Director and the Director of Business Services (where TCS reports) meet every two weeks to discuss issues of common concern.

 

CNS/AMS and TCS are working on a team with Housing to bring cable TV and high-speed network access to the Residence Halls.

 

A UCB, 5-year Data Communication Plan that address all IT concerns is in final draft form.

 

TCS and CNS/AMS are exploring a single, joint pricing/cost recovery scheme for their services.

 

CNS/AMS is working with TCS to create a unified fiber upgrade plan for UCB.

 

Planning is in place to develop a single, joint customer service process for TCS and CNS/AMS.

 

. Joint training activities are planned for AMS/CNS and TCS staff.

 

These activities will lead to better service to the campus community as well as ultimate cost savings in the next few years that will be reallocated to a variety

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation Cagey

 

of IT needs. More changes to coordinate the functions and services of the two units are expected to continue at a fast pace during the rest of the AY 96-97.

 

ITRC

The Instructional Technology Resource Center was founded two years ago to provide support services to faculty in the use of modern computing and telecommunications resources in their teaching. The large variety of ITRC activities include direct consultations with individual faculty, work with entire departments on coordinated curricular changes, provision of grants to individual faculty for development of new uses of technology in specific courses, coordination of four-campus CU programs that provide IT support funds to UCB, and seminars.

 

The ITRC reports within the Faculty Teaching Excellence Program (FTEP), with a dotted reporting line to the CIO. This structure was established to ensure and stress that uses of new technologies are driven first and foremost by pedagogic concerns; we are not using technology just because it is available and fashionable. ITRC also has significant input from CNS/AMS, the Libraries and CPBIT.

 

Recent analysis of ITRC functions revealed that the level of sophistication of faculty use of the new technologies has increased to a degree that warrants some changes in our campus model of IT support for faculty. At the highest level FTEP will be assuming a larger role for the pedagogic aspects of technology usage, integrating such this use into the broad spectrum of its support for teaching. At the other end, CNS/AMS subunits, such as WebWorks (responsible for actually writing the code that is the basis of individual WWW pages) will provide technical services that are supported by both the General Fund CNS/AMS budget and recharges to users. The ITRC will concentrate on individual support and consultation to faculty in the actual use of specific IT-based applications and tools in their teaching.

 

The ITRC budget in its first full year, AY 95-96, involved an on-going allocation of $18,000 from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and one-time funds of $60,000 from the Office of the Chancellor. This was supplemented with one-time funds from the Office of the President and from the CCHE, earmarked for specific activities. In AY 96-97 the funds from the Chancellor's Office were discontinued (except for a one-time allocation of $30,000) and new continuing funds of $70,000 for Technology Investment from the President's Office were provided, yielding a continuing allocation to ITRC of $78,000 (i.e., $18,000 + $60,000.) that will also be available in AY 97-98. This sum, plus the new funds for ITRC described above as part of the Technology Reinvestment Fund, and other one-time monies from the President's Office and the CCHE, will be sufficient to run the ITRC. Thus, no other new funds are requested for the ITRC at this time.

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page 15

 

Publications & Marketing

 

Publications & Marketing is responsible for creating and producing the official pages of the UCB WWW home page. Last year a new position was created (with Chancellor's Office funds) within their office (managing editor) to write, develop, and administer the campus Web site. Along with funding the position, $10,000 was allocated for student hourly money for production services.

 

The arrangement for these production services quickly proved inadequate for several reasons. First, what constitutes the highest (marketing) levels of the home page has been come to be defined as all information intended for an external audience down to and including the school and college level. In developing the Campus Home Page to be a comprehensive source of information for an external audience, a vast amount of information must be initially posted at these levels. Second, Publications & Marketing has been inundated with a demand for posting policies, procedures, and other materials which are important resources used by the internal community to serve our external audience. Third, the Web is a rapidly evolving medium, and we must update the design and technology of the UCB Home Page on a frequent basis to stay current with our peer institutions.

 

Therefore, to meet the Boulder campus's Home Page production needs Publications & Marketing is requesting an increase of $20,000 from the Chancellor's Office for production activities. A portion of these funds will be used through the CNS/AMS WebWorks on a fee-for-service basis. This arrangement will realize an economy of scale whereby campus clients will have a seamless electronic production system.

 

I l Libraries

 

The University Libraries play a large and obvious role in the campus use of IT. Electronically provided materials such as journals, databases and the online catalog are the content base for our scholarly and teaching activities. As such, a significant portion of the Libraries' budget supports the use of IT. The addition of and/or shift to electronic materials from printed materials is handled by internal reallocations in the Libraries budget that were part of the Dean's budget presentation. Further reallocations will provide new hardware that enables IT usage, namely, a GIS Workstation and 10, 486-based PCs in the new Earth Sciences Library, and $60,000 for Pentium-based computers in the Norlin reference section.

 

The Dean did request $25,000 in new, one-time funds to allow the Library to acquire a new Web Server type workstation. Currently the Libraries catalog is reached from outside of library buildings by the old route of Telnet access. A new, Web-page based access will make library resources more readily

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation page l6

 

available, and will enable a variety of new services. The Libraries are now developing such a Web site, similar to what is being done at our peer institutions, that will be maintained on the Web Server that is requested.

 

Housing Services

 

The CPBIT Working Paper recognizes the critical need for student access to IT in its Action Item that states:

 

"A financial plan should be developed to fund expansion of the current pilot project of ethernet access to all residence halls." (#3.2)

 

The need for this is, by now, self-evident, and all of our peer institutions are moving in this direction. Thus, the CIO, CPBIT and especially Keith Jackson of Housing Services and Dennis Maloney of TCS have worked diligently to develop a plan that allows provision of Ethernet, high-speed access to the Internet to every Residence Hall resident, without extra cost to the General Fund.

 

Basic wiring with optical fiber will be provided in the first year, in large part as an adjunct to wiring of the Halls for cable TV. Service to students will be phased in over about two years, a few Halls at a time. As well as connectivity, Housing will provide additional, trained RAs and staff whose only job will be to provide assistance and support to student users. A complete budget model shows that the Start-up Costs (spread over at least two years) will be $2,482,500 and that yearly operating costs at full build out will be $1,044,300. Payback of the start-up costs (including any loan interest costs) is amortized over 5 years by the fees charged to each student. As Ethernet connectivity in each Hall is activated, a charge of $275/year for the service will automatically be added to the rate each student pays.

 

| Others l

 

This sub-section describes certain key activities that do not involve requests for General Fund monies in AY 97-98, but that are important to recognize in order to have a complete picture of the IT situation.

 

Request for increased student computing fee

 

The CUBIT Working Paper recognizes the significant need for more student computer labs across a variety of disciplines in the Action Item that states:

 

"Strong consideration should be given to increasing the student computing fee to meet demand for more student-used labs, as well as more kiosks, and machines in student-group offices. This should be pursued by the CPBIT and the CIO for inclusion in the next budget cycle." (#3.8)

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation Cagey

 

A request from CPBIT and -the CIO is currently pending before the Student Fee Committee for an increase in the fee from $30/year per student, to $60/year per student, starting in AY 97-98. This is a way to finance these resource that all students will benefit from, based on reasonable charges.

 

Development of Internet2

 

An advanced national network that will provide researchers at top universities and Government labs with better Internet-type access is under development. Named Internet2, it will provide significantly faster, guaranteed access to participants. Transfer of large amounts of data, sophisticated real-time video-conferencing, and other new and important services will be available.

 

UCB is a leader in the research and development that will be the basis of Internet2, based on our current networking excellence and the work of key faculty. In fact, we were the first institution to gain high-speed, Internet2 type access to the interned funded by the NSF and NASA. In coming years we will need to upgrade parts of our network infrastructure to fully utilize Internet2. The resources will come from grants, reallocations and some new funds.

 

Administrative Streamlining Program (ASP)

 

The CUBIT Working Paper recognizes the potential impact on UCB of the ASP in the Action Item that states:

 

"The UCB administrators responsible for campus aspects of the system wide Administrative Streamlining Process should ensure that the technical and financial IT concerns of the campus are adequately understood and addressed." (#2.1)

 

The ASP project will bring about a need for new UCB revenues to be allocated to new computers in some administrative offices, significant upgrades of the campus network infrastructure, and training costs. Aggressive input to the system wide administrators of this project and careful planning will be needed to avoid having significant expenditures mandated on UCB.

 

4. Cloys Prioritization

 

The Technology Reinvestment Fund of $500,000 (continuing) is clearly the single highest need, as it allows the fruits of all other current and new IT resource allocations to be made available to all faculty. An significant decrease in the amount will extend both the phase-in and the replacement cycle beyond the useful life of the computers that are to be provided to faculty, thus undoing the intent of the program. Similarly, the funds to provide additional support through the ITRC and departments is critical to the success of this program.

CIO/CPBIT Budget Presentation Cagey

 

The next tier of items includes the request to Academic Affairs for $25,000 for the Libraries Web Server, and the request to the Chancellor's Office for $20,000 for additional Web site production activities by Publications & Marketing. These are both clearly necessary if we are to maintain the usefulness of our Web-based approaches to IT.

 

The CNS/AMS request for $200,000 is the next priority. This will allow better and increased service in a time of increasing IT use and technological changes. The data generated by the new Service Center will facilitate new charging mechanisms to recover costs where appropriate. It is possible that some of these recharges could be instituted during 1998, while the Service Center is being put in place, thus helping to partially cover the $200,000 request.

 

The Housing Services plan for provision of high-speed Ethernet connectivity in the Residence Halls is a top priority. Authorization to proceed is needed, rather than funds.

I APPENDIX

 

CPBIT Working Paper

I

 

| CPBIT Working Paper - AY 1996-97

| Prepared by Mark Dubin, Chair

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

1. Many studies related to Information Technology (IT) have been completed at UCB in the past five years. These provide a rich basis for continued planning, and for the development of IT at UCB. Now, more studies are not necessary; rather, turning the previous studies into action is the task before the Campus Policy Board on Information Technology (CPBIT).

 

2. There is general agreement in these studies that Information Technology is having a transformative impact on the University, its pursuits and its culture—a transformation that requires close attention, planning and action. To quote the Final Report of the 1995 Program Review of Computing and Network Services: "[UCB] should commit to a multi-year staged plan that builds [IT] budget and staffing . . . toward a level commensurate with the campus needs and comparable with peer institutions."

 

3. Guidelines published by Higher Education Information Resources Alliance are used as a framework for describing specific actions that need to be taken at UCB. These actions are closely based on the previous UCB reports and studies. The major areas of concern delineated in the Guidelines are:

 

Academic Program Support - Academic programs are supported by appropriate electronic information resources.

 

Administrative User Support - The institution's operations and management are supported by appropriate information resources.

 

Access - Electronic information resources are readily accessible by faculty, staff, and students so they may accomplish their work.

 

Extended Boundaries - The institution is moving to exploit technology to extend the traditional boundaries of the campus.

 

Institution wide Planning and IT Management - A well-developed planning process which is tied to the institutional budgeting process is in place for information resources. Advisory groups are in place.

 

Policy Structure - Usage policies are published.

 

Staffing - Professional staff with appropriate expertise are available to support faculty, students, and staff to use and maintain services and facilities.

 

4. Forty-three "Action Items" are identified and summarized at the end of this document. Examples of key items in each area are:

 

Academic Program Support

 

- Develop financial mechanisms to continuously upgrade the campus backbone and network.

 

- Devise a budget plan to increase the number of smart classrooms.

 

Version 2.0 - 3/1/97

-

Assure that costs associated with upgrading the reliability of the campus network are considered whenever major projects require increased reliability.

 

- Continue to increase support for the ITRC.

 

- Faculty evaluation committees at all levels should incorporate recognition for the development of instructional IT into their proceedings.

 

Administrative User Support

 

- The UCB administrators responsible for campus aspects of the system wide Administrative Streamlining Process should ensure that the technical and financial IT concerns of the campus are adequately understood and addressed.

 

- Provision must be made for campus-centralized coordination of the provision and maintenance of administrative data.

 

- Budget plans must be developed that facilitate all departments/units on campus to have equipment and connectivity necessary to use on-line administrative services.

 

- Planning and implementation of systems that provide more on-line services to students must be pursued aggressively.

 

. Access

 

- A first priority is to develop a plan and budget proposal for the on-going provision of a "Web-browser" capable computer to every faculty member and to appropriate staff members. A 4 year renewal cycle should be contemplated.

 

- Strong consideration should be given to increasing the student computing fee to meet demand for more student-used labs, as well as more kiosks and machines in student-group offices. This should be pursued by the CPBIT and the CIO for inclusion in the next budget cycle.

 

- A financial plan must be developed to fund expansion of the current pilot project of ethernet access to all residence halls.

 

- Continued development of more student labs is necessary, indicating a need for an increased student computing fee.

 

- CPBIT should work with the Dean of Libraries and the Libraries faculty advisory committee to assure planning, written policies and procedures in support of provision of scholarly "content." This should include a budget plan that coordinates Libraries IT expenses with other Campus IT expenses.

 

- Consideration must be given to providing departmental budgets adequate to support IT access, especially in the humanities and social sciences.

 

ii

Extended Boundaries

 

- CPBIT should work closely with the Dean of Continuing Education in planning for additional distance learning offerings by UCB.

 

- Work with the campus IT community to identify and support unique opportunities for service outreach activities.

 

Institution wide Planning and IT Management

 

- A first priority of CPBIT should be to develop a coordinated budget presentation for all IT activities in time for the AY 96-97 budget planning cycle. This should include working with all major IT providers and users.

 

- Assure that formal mechanisms are in place to do coordinated planning among the various IT provider groups, involving CPBIT as appropriate.

 

Policy Structure

 

- CPBIT should work with relevant Campus units to develop procedures for the enforcement of all IT usage policies as well as new policies as necessary.

 

Staffing

 

- CPBIT must work with CNS and other IT providers and users to develop a coordinated strategy for provision of user support, including budget planning for the increases in support staff that are necessary.

 

5. CPBIT, chaired by the Chief Information Officer (CIO), defines and oversees processes that address these needs.

 

6. CPBIT is broken into four Working Groups, each of which deals with action items defined in this working paper. The Working Groups are:

 

- Teaching, Learning and Scholarly IT Concerns

 

- Administrative and Student-Life IT Concerns and Resources

 

- IT Usage Policies and Procedures

 

- Core IT Infrastructure Providers Group

 

. . .

111

~;

INTRODUCTION

 

Numerous studies have been completed at UCB in past few years that provide a rich basis for planning and development in the area of Information Technology (IT). Now, more studies are not necessary; rather, turning the previous ones into action is the task before the Campus Policy Board on Information Technology (CPBIT). This working paper is meant to focus that task by consolidating the UCB studies into a single framework, placing them in the context of related national studies, and presenting goals and action items.

 

Key studies at UCB, and at the CU system level, include:

Information Technology Principles to Guide Campus Decision-Making. UCB Chancellor's Committee on Information Technology, '94. {CCIT}

Computing and Network Services (CNS) Strategic Plan, '95. {CNS-SP}

CNS Program Review - Self Study, Fall '95. {CNS-SS}

CNS Program Review - Internal Review Committee Report, Fall '95. {CNS-IR}

CNS Program Review - External Review Committee Report, Spring '96. {CNSER)

CNS Program Review - Panel Final Report, Spring '96. {CNS-PRP}

UCB Strategic Plan for Data Communications, '95 {DC-SPJ

Strategic Planning Document for Information Technology {AA-SP}. Academic Affairs, Strategic Plan Information Technology Working Group, 3/96.

Telecommunications Services Program Review, '95.

Strategic Planning for Administrative Information Technology - Status Report. CU System Vice President for Budget and Finance, 4/95. {CLASP}

 

The thoroughness of this work at CU is attested to by its congruence to many reports in the National literature. ( A rather complete online bibliography, with full text of many of the references, can be found at the CAUSE WWW site, <http://cause-www.colorado.edu/resources/campus.html >.) Some that will be made reference to include:

HEIR ALLIANCE Evaluation guidelines for Institutional Information Resources '95. tHEIR} ("HEIR ALLIANCE" is the Higher Education Information Resources Alliance of the: Association of Research Libraries (ARL); CAUSE, the association for managing and using information resources in higher education; and, Educom, a non-profit consortium of leading colleges and universities seeking to transform education through the use of information technology.)

Higher Education and the NII: From Vision to Reality. Report of Proceedings of the 9/95, Monterey Conference. tHE-NIIJ

Assessing the Academic Networked Environment: Strategies and Options. Coalition for Networked Information. '96. {CNI}

CIO Constituent Group Session Report, CAUSE National Conf. '95. {CAUSE}

 

1

The HEIR Alliance Evaluation Guidelines for Institutional Information Resources provide categories within which higher education IT issues can be organized and assessed. These provide the organizing principles of this working paper and are presented in the table on page 5, somewhat modified to fit local circumstances.

 

Each of the categories in the table is treated in the remainder of the working paper. The general format is to indicate what the national reports and UCB/CU studies say about:

where we are now where we need to be going

what specific things must be done short-term and long-term. This includes "Action Items" sequentially numbered by section (i.e., 1.1). These are collected in summary formats at the end of the working paper for ease of reference.

 

CPBIT ORGANIZATION

 

The CPBIT membership and the Chief Information Officer (CIO) are advisory to the Chancellor and the Cabinet regarding all aspects of IT. Starting in Academic year 1996-97 CPBIT has been reorganized. It is now chaired by the Campus CIO, an Associate Vice Chancellor in Academic Affairs who as CIO reports to both the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and the Vice Chancellor for Administration. The membership of the Committee represents faculty, staff, students and all major IT supplier and user groups.

 

The full Committee meets a few times per year to discuss and decide major policy, but its large size makes regular, working meetings impractical. Thus, the full membership has defined a number of "CPBIT Working Groups" that each deal with a major area of concern. Some CPBIT members, one of whom is chair, serve on each committee. Other members of the campus community with relevant expertise and/or interest are added to round out each working group and also to promote wide involvement.

 

The CPBIT Working Groups are:

Teaching, Learning and Scholarly IT Concerns

Administrative and Student-Life IT Concerns and Resources

IT Usage Policies and Procedures

Core IT Infrastructure Providers Group

GENERAL PRINCIPLES - "CHANGING WITH CHANGE"

 

Computers and computing have been touted as the basis of radical change in higher education for at least 25 years. However, the promise was repeatedly greater than the actuality. Information technology, in reality, was costly and difficult for the average campus citizen to use on an everyday basis. Yet, there is probably no risk in saying that now information technology really is having and will continue to have a transformative impact on the University, a transformation that requires close attention, planning and action. This is reflected in the following quotes from a variety of national and CU reports.

 

National

 

"Over the past ten years, networks of computers have moved from being a small but important aspect of university research to a worldwide phenomenon involving millions of users and thousands of service providers.... the Internet and its underlying information infrastructure have become the foremost technological revolution of our time and perhaps, in history. For higher education, the implications of a pervasive electronic information infrastructure are immense. Innovations such as immersive teaching, distributed instruction, and access to information resources represent only a snapshot of expanded opportunities for scholarship and research." {HE-NII}

 

The Global Information Infrastructure . . . "is a communications medium; as such, it has the potential to change the social relationships which constitute the organization of scholarly communication, teaching and learning, and administration. {Peter Lyman in HE-NII}

 

"Almost everyone in higher education now looks to networks and networked resources when formulating strategies for addressing the enduring missions of and life of the mind: learning, teaching, research and community service." {Paul

Evwan Peters in CNI}

 

"The [IT] environment is tremendously exciting and rapidly changing; our [higher education] constituencies whom we once had to convince to use technology are now demanding more than we can provide.... [there are] rising expectations that are difficult to meet." {CAUSED

 

University of Colorado

 

"Teaching, learning, research/creative work, and public service are the primary missions of the University. The major rationale for information technology resources is to support the primary missions of the University." fCCrT)

 

"Uses and users of advanced IT will permeate the academy over the next five years. IT provides unique opportunities for increased productivity, creativity and scholarship by providing innovative means to meet the university's teaching and research missions... [however] the development of IT on campus will not replace much conventional pedagogy or research - it will largely enhance or augment them.... Other -universities are moving quickly to embrace IT and those . . . that do not do so aggressively are likely to be left behind. Advancing

 

3

the University's IT capabilities is critical to its vitality and future success and its ability to compete and attract the best students and faculty." {AA-SPI

 

"Data communications is critical both to the daily operation of the campus and to the overall effectiveness of the institution in meeting its own broader goals for research, education, and public service. Given this importance, data communications must be funded in a manner that insures continued reliable service in an environment that places increasing demands of access, performance, and availability on the data communications infrastructure." {DC-SP}

 

"IT is a key mechanism in achieving the overall institutional goals identified in the University of Colorado at Boulder Strategic Plan." {CNS-SP}

 

"The University of Colorado at Boulder exists in a complex, interconnected world whose lifeblood is information. . . and will increasingly need to rely on technology to succeed in meeting the educational needs of the 21st century.... Continued change in this field is now the norm rather than the exception. Information technology offers the campus remarkable opportunities for expansion of learning and scholarly activities, as well as enhancing public service that will benefit the state, nation, and world." (ccfrl

 

"The University of Colorado holds that administration is not an end in itself, but only a tool for accomplishing the University's mission. Administrative IT, then, is likewise a tool to support that mission, one that must both respond to and stimulate process changes in administration." (cu-sP}

 

"The [CU System] vision [for administrative IT] is of computer proficient knowledge workers who have easy, facilitated access to significant data and information through interconnected machine media. These capabilities are used in processes that are regularly reexamined and are streamlined through use of new information technology capabilities." (cu-sPJ

 

"A comment on planning is in order. IT is in a period of rapid change, most likely the most rapid change in the last 50 years or so. As Peters notes [in The Pllrsllit of Wow! Every Person's Guide to Topsy-turvey Times,] 'tidy times call for tidy strategic schemes. The times aren't tidy, and so our strategic schemes shouldn't be, either.' Spending too much time on planning and too little time on doing dooms an organization to irrelevance when the pace of change far exceeds the pace of plans." (CNS-ERCI

 

Finally, it is informative to quote from the Final Report of the 1995 Program Review of CNS: "[UCB] should commit to a multi-year staged plan that builds budget and staffing of CNS toward a level commensurate with the campus' needs and comparable with peer institutions." It is clear from the report that this recommendation also extends to IT as a whole, not just to CNS. In that sense, it resembles the findings of the 1980 North Central Association Accreditation report of UCB that found significant needs in the University Libraries and that led to a significant infusion of new funds into the Libraries' budget.

 

4

1. Academic Program Support - Academic programs are

supported by appropriate electronic information on resources.

 

A. Infrastructure

 

i. high-speed communications networks ii. high-technology classrooms

 

iii. access to networked resources: i e., WWW/lnternet; email iv. access to a digital repository

 

B. Support i. multimedia instructional development staff and facilities ii. electronic conferencing facilities

 

C. Culture - the institutional environment encourages faculty and students to make appropriate and innovative uses of electronic information resources

 

12. Administrative User Support- The institution's operations and

| management are supported by appropriate information resources. [

 

A. Information resources are viewed as having the potential to improve business processes for greater efficiency and effectiveness

 

B. Initiatives that make use of information resources to provide better administrative services and savings are encouraged and supported

 

C. A locus of responsibility for the institution's digital information is identified

_

3. Access- Electronic information resources are readily accessible by faculty, staff, and students so they may accomplish s_their work.

 

A. Faculty and staff office connectivity and hardware B. Student connectivity and hardware C. Departmental resources D. Academic facilities and scholarly resources E. Labs and Kiosks on campus F. Dial-in from off campus G. Common software

 

[4. Extended Boundaries - The institution is moving to exploit| technology to extend the_traditional boundaries of the campus. j A. Distance and lifelong learning: at centralized remote locations; at the work site; in the home

 

B. Outreach activities to the community, State and Nation

 

5. Institution wide Planning and IT Management - A well developed planning process which is tied to the institutional budgeting process is in place for information resources. Advisory groups are in place.

 

A. A locus of responsibility for IT has been identified

 

B. Appropriate advisory and policy committees exist to provide guidance and direction in the development and use of institutional information resources. Involvement of all major user organizations, faculty, senior administrators, librarians, IT professionals, staff and students is insured

 

C. There is adequate and stable funding to support the institution's continuing commitments to electronic information resources, including capital replacement funding and annual budget allocations for upgrading and maintenance

 

6. Policy Structure - Usage policies are published. l A. Policies and procedures are in place to promote legal, responsible and secure use of IT resources by individuals, by campus organizations, and by the institution

 

7. Staffing - Professional staff with appropriate expertise are available to support faculty, students, and staff to use and maintain services and facilities.

_,

A. Provision is made for adequate staff in IT provider units, both centrally and in divisional, school, or department units close to user, for internal operations and user support

 

B. Support services--documentation, development, consultation, training, maintenance--meet the needs of users when new technologies are acquired

1. ACADEMIC PROGRAM SUPPORT

 

_ _

 

lA(i). Infrastructure - high-speed communications networks

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"UCB needs . . . the highest possible bandwidth connection to the Internet, which in 1996 would suggest a 45-155 Mbits/sec connection, and the bandwidth needs to be steadily increased to maintain parity with the bandwidth available at leading national research universities." {AA-SPJ

 

"[UCB] will continue to be a leader in state and regional networking, both to provide outreach and to ensure that its own needs are met.... The core services of the network should be dynamic and maintained consistent with the IT climate of the campus; financial support should keep pace with these changes." {CCIT}

 

"The ability to move large quantities of data over networks without exceeding capacity or reducing response time is essential to the development of all of the new technologies." {cu-sPJ

 

"Every faculty member, appropriate staff, and where applicable, student, should have high speed network (at least 10 Mbit/sec switched) . . . access from his or her office." {AA-SP)

 

"All members of the academic community will have access to the networks at reasonable cost." {CCITI

 

"Support researchers' needs for high-bandwidth communications." (DC-SPI

 

"Most classroom and study room seats as well as library carrels should be provided with a network access jack allowing students and faculty to plug in a laptop computer. Upcoming wireless technology may also be useful here." (AA-SP}

 

"Investigate the possibility of building a wireless network capability allowing use of laptop computers . . . [anywhere] on campus." (AA-SPI

 

"Every student residing on-campus should have high-speed (10 Mbit/sec) access from his or her dormitory room." (AA-SP)

 

"Access jacks in all locations should be [active] at all times without charge to any department or unit. This is the only way to ensure universality of access." (AA-SPI

 

"Software, hardware, and network resources [should be] appropriate in quantity and quality to meet academic program needs.''(HElR)

 

"A comprehensive set of technical standards is identified and supported.... Standards assist in the effective integration and utilization of IT resources. IT agencies must work to maintain and follow standards in order to meet common user needs.... The Boulder campus [should] minimize the number of different communication systems and will continue to develop and [normally] require the use of approved campus communication standards." (CCIT}

 

6

CURRENT STATUS

 

"The campus enjoys . . . [the highest] speed access to national data networks [of any university]." {CNS-SSI

 

"Telecommunication Services provides voice communication services to the Boulder campus, as well as the fiber and copper infrastructures to support the campus data and video needs and requirements. Telecommunication Services manages the facilities and cable, including the installation, maintenance, repair, expansion, documentation, and record keeping. Short and long term planning for the expansion of the cable plant systems, especially the fiber optic system, has been done in conjunction with the department of CNS. Telecommunication Services has been responsible for the funding of the cable plant expansion through departmental revenues generated from the rebilling of services. This funding plan is reviewed and set by the Chancellor each year." /DC-SP}

 

"Nearly all buildings are networked and a majority of offices are connected to the campus network." {CNS-SSI

 

"Two networks presently serve the majority of the data communications needs for the Boulder campus. The Information Systems Network (ISN) is an aging set of five interconnected switches that provide 9600 bps asynchronous connections across campus.... The ISN currently provides low-speed, asynchronous, interactive access. This service is normally used to switch connections between terminals, workstations, and printers to ports on host computers. The ISN uses fiber optic cable between buildings and twisted pair copper wire within buildings. There are approximately [2,000] endpoints and the number of connections is decreasing roughly 10% per year. Higher speed connectivity is provided by an internetwork currently composed of Ethernet segments and FDDI rings.... For the most part, the two networks are used for different purposes, although since the addition of terminal servers onto the campus Internet, it too acts as a vehicle for asynchronous, interactive traffic between hosts and terminals." (DC-SP}

 

"Ethernet hardware forms the basis for departmental LANs (Local Area Networks) allowing for file and print sharing. Despite the media commonality among campus LANs, many different platforms (e.g., Novell, AppleShare, NFS, Personal NetWare) are used. Departmental LANs are replacing traditional asynchronous terminals to access administrative systems such as FRS, POLIS, and SIS." (Dc-sro

 

NEEDS

 

"Growth in network use, growth in the number of faculty members who incorporate computing in their classes, pressures from the workplace to train students in current technology, the level of expertise of incoming students, all contribute to demand that cannot be fully met with available resources.... For example, the bandwidth of the campus backbone has remained relatively constant over the last two years, even though use of the networks has increased dramatically." {CNS-SS}

 

7

"The Boulder campus network infrastructure, including the backbone, must be enhanced and expanded to keep up with demand and with developing technology. Network improvement has long lead times, and planning for backbone enhancement should be proactive.... The campus [must identify funding to support necessary expansion and enhancement of the campus backbone facilities." fCCITI

 

"Expand backbone and building network capacities to handle growth." {DC-SP}

 

"Growth of campus LANs is driven by the increased need to share more expensive resources (e.g., CD ROM, optical media, and high-end printers), new work environments (e.g., tele-commuting, work-groups), and more sophisticated software (e.g., e-mail based applications, directory services, and client-server), and increased user needs. Network administrators have had to cope with the software problems presented by integrating not only new systems but also existing systems. The campus has had to deal with increased demands on the network infrastructure." {DC-SP)

 

"There are many different forces that will influence data communications policy over the next five years. Changes in the applications used and even changes in users themselves have a considerable impact. Connectivity and the external environment will force the campus to move in certain directions. The campus needs to be prepared to provide an environment suitable for the developments or changes in the following areas:

* Client-server

* Audio and video (both real-time and multimedia)

* Smarter interactive and collaborative classrooms

* Integration of data communications and telephony

* Information services

* Data warehousing

* Administrative computing - Departmental and system-wide

* New desktop applications

* New security systems and authentication

 

* Utilities functions

* Increase in the number of users

 

* Users intensifying their demands upon the network

* Expansion of the geographical limits of the network

* Expansion of high-end computing

 

* Growth of ethernet use." {DC-SP)

"The use of intra-building fiber is critical to providing current Ethernet service in most buildings. New technology services, which are on the horizon, will require higher bandwidth and will make use of even more intra-building fiber. (This is often called "vertical fiber" because it runs vertically within buildings as opposed to the relatively horizontal fiber runs between buildings.)" {DC-SPA

 

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"The campus networks have become mission critical for numerous university functions and are becoming more so. The networks are increasingly considered to be a utility, and the users' expectations are that it will be available at all times. . . . The reality of the situation is that outages do occur and maintenance must be performed.... As a mechanism for increasing availability and reliability, the use of FDDI should be expanded to include all hub sites. Diverse fiber paths should be used, both on campus and between the main campus and the east campus. Because of the expense of complete redundancy, on-line automatic redundancy will be provided only at the campus backbone level." (DC-SPJ

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

1.1 Develop financial mechanisms to continuously upgrade the campus backbone and network.

 

1.2 "Create test beds for new networking technologies such as ATM and wireless data communications.... [and] develop a distributed computing environment and the services it offers. . . [including] secure hosts and networks, authentication, institutional file system, and institutional backup system." (CNS-SPI

 

1.3 Assure that a campus policy exists concerning intra-building fiber, and that it is regularly reexamined in light of technical advances.

 

1.4 Assure that costs associated with upgrading the reliability of the campus network are considered whenever major projects require increased reliability.

 

1.5 "Use of uninterruptable power supplies should be expanded to include all new hub sites and any location that serves as a central network service point. A power outage in one building should not affect users whose network connections do not terminate in that building but are simply routed through." {DC-SPJ

 

lA(ii). infrastructure - high-technology classrooms i

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"Smart classrooms have proven their effectiveness by enabling the teacher to provide more realistic access to information resources than is possible with transparency technology.... A smart classroom should have both the capability to display networked data and also to broadcast to the network." (AA-SP}

 

"Portable carts capable of providing wireless network broadcast within a classroom should be investigated as a means to provide network [access] for large numbers of smaller rooms." (AA-SPI

 

"[Teaching] resources [should be] regularly updated to meet current and emerging academic program needs?" {HEIR)

 

"The University will develop physical facilities, infrastructure, and support functions to encourage instructional computing applications of all types." (CCIT)

 

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CURRENT STATUS

 

"Academic Media Services develops and maintains high-technology classrooms that are equipped with a full range of current delivery systems," including 19 Smart Classrooms. rcns-ss

 

NEEDS

 

"Smart classrooms should be increased at a rate of at least two per year until supply of such rooms matches the demand." {AA-SP}

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

1.6 Devise a budget plan to increase smart classrooms at least two per year, preferably at a rate of ten or more per year.

 

lA(iii).Infrastructure - access to networked resources: l | i.e., ttlSFHVIInternet;e-m ail l

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"The institution . . . utilizes the national and international information infrastructure . . . to make appropriate information available on the network as well as accessing it." (HEIR}

 

"The core of campus information technology resources and services is barrier-free and provided to Boulder campus users without discrimination based on ability to pay." fCCrT)

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

"All students, faculty, and staff are eligible for electronic mail accounts. . . [in Fall 95 there were] 6,600 faculty/staff users, 18,500 student users, and another 2,100 users who fit into both categories, [having] access . . . to information resources such as UCB Web pages, CUline, CUline-PLUS, and the Libraries' records.... Many individuals and some departments are using their own World Wide Web pages to communicate with others, both on- and off-campus." {CNS-SS}

 

"UCB has recognized a need for coordinating Web services and Web information, and staff members from three departments are now working together to address issues such as consistency, timeliness, accuracy of information, information ownership, copyright, and pornography. The groups are also working out a way for the campus to offer Web services for departments and faculty members to take advantage of Web technology." {CNS-SS)

 

"The Office of Admissions has developed CD-ROM materials as part of a recruiting information distributed to high schools.... [and] Web pages with extensive recruiting information. An interactive application form is being developed. The office of Student Affairs Communications Services is working on a campus photographic tour for posting on the UCB Web pages." (cns-ss}

 

[CNS encourages] "the use of online information systems by providing navigation, access, and informational tools." {CNS-SP)

 

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NEEDS

 

"There is likely . . . [much] information held by departments and individuals on campus that would benefit others if . . . accessible electronically." {CNS-SSJ

 

"CUBIT [should identify] core services and options for funding." (CCITI ACTION ITEMS

 

1.7 Actively encourage all UCB community members and units to provide Web-based access, as appropriate, to their materials.

 

1.8 Continued provision of core services should be assured and upgrades identified as they become technically feasible.

 

4 lA(iv), Infrastructure - access to a digital repository l OBJECTIVES

 

"UCB should create a supported data mass storage facility, a facility where any faculty would find adequate on-line space, with guaranteed availability and backup, for storing and publishing of all materials." (AA-SP}

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

No specific efforts are being made in this area. NEEDS

 

The exact nature of such a service and its costs need to be investigated. ACTION ITEMS

 

1.9 Determine the needs for and cost of a UCB central data mass-storage facility for scholarly and instructional use.

 

< lB(i). Support - multimedia instructional development staff and facilities

OBJECTIVES

 

"Information technology and its role in instruction is fundamental to the future of the Boulder campus. Incorporating instructional computing into campus teaching and learning is encouraged." (CCITI

 

"Support and training [should be] provided to help faculty and students learn to use and effectively apply . . . [IT] resources." (HEIR}

 

"Faculty should be encouraged to explore new uses of IT in teaching. Ongoing internal grant funding mechanisms should be expanded for investigating greater use of IT in current courses and for running pilot studies on the effectiveness of various IT solutions. (AA-SPI

 

"The University will invest comprehensively in development of its information technology activities, facilities, and support for instruction in all fields." (CCIT)

 

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CURRENT STATUS

 

"The Instructional Technology Resource Center (ITRC) assists faculty members in incorporating technology in their teaching. The University Libraries offer training in using databases and other electronic resources. Continuing Education offers a number of opportunities for learning about computing resources, including low-cost workshops for UCB faculty, staff, and students." {CNS-SS)

 

Numerous grants for development of IT use in the curriculum are available to faculty through Campus, System and State sponsored programs.

 

NEEDS

 

The demands on the ITRC for assistance exceed the resources available.

 

"Incorporating computing and IT into instruction [must] be rewarded." {CCITJ ACTION ITEMS

 

1.10 Continue to increase support for the ITRC, based on assessed need.

 

1.11 Faculty evaluation committees at all levels should incorporate recognition for the development of instructional IT into their proceedings.

 

lB(ii). Support - electronic conferencing facilities

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"Live boards, electronic white boards, and portable video conferencing and video capture equipment should be available.~AA-sPs

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

An origination studio for video conferencing, primarily used by the UC System, is maintained at Academic Media Services.

 

The campus is a funded site in a national consortium that will explore the use of video via the Internet.

 

NEEDS

 

The demands for this kind of service need to be determined, and new services developed as they become easily useable and supportable.

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

1.12 CNS will "investigate communications services, including video conferencing, integrated communication servers, and other tools as they emerge and lead discussions on deployment strategies." {CNS-SP}

 

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51C(i). Culture - the institutional environment encourages faculty and students tow make appropriate and innovative uses of electronic information resources

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"Information and its related technologies [should be] used to improve the productivity and effectiveness of campus functions. In this way, IT enables the campus to direct resources to support the primary missions of teaching, learning, research, and public service." (CCrT)

 

"Risk-taking in the use of advanced technologies is encouraged in academic areas, but risks are to be minimized through careful management in administrative areas." {CCIT}

 

"[UCB] must address rapidly-emerging changes to the information technology environment. Planning for information technology needs to take direction from the following anticipated developments:

* Continued expansion in both the user base across campus and in the kinds of tools that those people use.

* Changes in user expectations, as students, faculty, and staff arrive on campus with higher levels of computing experience.

* Changes in the external environment, most particularly in networking, copyright issues, and government regulations.

* Shifts in the traditional university model, as education extends far beyond the physical walls of the institution and research increases its interuniversity focus.

* A fundamental shift in the paradigm from interoperability to interworking, as computers move from being tools and job aids into being portals into collaborative working environments." {CNS-SPI

 

"Develop an electronic publishing and broadcast group. . . [that] would assist faculty in all areas related to electronic publishing, including development of interactive video services as well as static materials." {AA-SPI

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

"A number of resources are available specifically for faculty members to acquire, explore, and use new technologies. The CNS DISC (Demonstrations and Information on Small Computers) Center. .. [provides faculty assistance in choosing hardware and software and] in preparing purchase orders. CNS also makes portable computers available to faculty members on sabbatical." {CNS-SSI

 

The Faculty Teaching Excellence Program runs workshops and seminars that assist faculty in the use of technology in their pedagogy.

 

"Many faculty members require their students to use computing resources through the use of e-mail, Web pages, news groups, and research on the Internet." (CNS-SS}

 

See also item lB(i), above.

 

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NEEDS

 

Attention should be given to faculty perceptions about IT.

 

Assistance with electronic publishing should be explored.

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

1.13 Attention should be given to determining and influencing faculty perceptions about the role of IT in the institutional culture.

 

1.14 Assistance with electronic publishing, possibly through a centralized service, should be explored.

 

2. ADMINISTRATIVE USER SUPPORT X |

 

2A. Information resources are viewed as having the potential to improve ; business processes for greater efficiency and effectiveness.

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"Facilitate the use of data communications to transform the academic and administrative processes of the institution." (DC-SPJ

 

"IT, coupled with a program of business process transformation, provides an opportunity to significantly improve the timeliness, accessibility and use of the information maintained by financial and other administrative systems." {AA-SPI

 

"Administrative data are the property of the University and [should be] generated and made accessible in ways that meet campus and university management needs. Boulder campus management should identify the data necessary for effective management of the campus. A process must be developed to identify administrative data required for emerging management needs." (CCIT}

 

"Boulder campus administrative system needs must be identified consistent with the campus strategic plan. System designers must consider broad campus and multi-campus needs.... Systems must be user-friendly and facilitate management's use of the information. Administrative systems not developed in coordination with this principle must be discouraged." {CCIT)

 

"Multi-campus systems should be designed with consideration of specific campus missions and priorities. Implementation of these systems should reflect individual campus operating environments." (CCIT}

 

"In developing . . . administrative systems, each campus unit must review its current policies and processes to ensure the most effective use of the system capabilities, even if this means changing current policies and processes." (CCITI

 

CU should "replace out of date administrative application systems with new systems based on cost effective, easy to use technologies.... we need flexible systems that can keep pace with both changing technologies and changing business practices, systems that can be 'redeveloped' on the fly. Current

 

I

 

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technologies provide much greater ease of use and are more responsive for improving administrative processes. tCU

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

An administrative Streamlining Project (ASP), including updating of the Financial and Human Resources computing systems is being launched as a system wide initiative.

 

"As systems move toward client-server technology and as network traffic increases, the gap widens between the software/hardware/network resources that are required and the software/hardware/network resources that are available. The software and hardware gap is due in large part to the increased cost that must be borne by the end user to acquire the desktop resources necessary to take advantage of system solutions developed using current technology. Network resources are at a premium because of the competing demands of academic and administrative use of the network." {CNS-SS}

 

NEEDS

 

The Boulder campus IT implications of the proposed system wide Administrative Streamlining Project must be determined and should have an influence on what the CU-System finally chooses to do. The processes and personnel put in place at the CU-System level to accomplish the streamlining must be mirrored, as necessary, at the Campus level. At the same time, current UCB services must be preserved while the new administrative system is being developed and implemented. Further, the costs to the campus of this entire process must be adequately estimated in advance and should influence what is done, as well as system wide budget planning. Finally, the fact that administrative systems exist to serve the academic mission of the University must be a predominant basis for the changes that are made.

 

"A recent survey of people who use financial systems information discovered that 40 percent of these users did not have the necessary hardware and/or software and/or network connectivity to take advantage of a client-server system. Although all of these departments could access and use current campus administrative systems or University legacy systems, they are not currently positioned to move in the same direction that is planned for the University's information systems. (CNS-SS}

 

"The systems development process must reflect management needs.... CPBIT should establish a multi-year plan for administrative systems to encompass their strategic, administrative, and replacement needs." {CCIT}

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

2.1 The UCB administrators responsible for campus aspects of the system wide Administrative Streamlining Process should ensure that the technical and financial IT concerns of the campus are adequately understood and addressed.

 

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2B. Initiatives that make use of information resources to provide better administrative services and savings are encouraged and supported

 

OBJECTIVES a "Administrative information resources [should be] provided electronically so as to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the institution." THEIR}

 

"Students [should be] able to use the World Wide Web to: a) apply to the university, b) register for classes, c) apply for financial aid, housing and parking stickers, d) check their progress towards graduation, e) buy movie, arts or sports event tickets, f) take examinations and fill out Faculty Course Questionnaires, g) browse all University publications." {AA-SPI

 

"Data dictionaries must accompany all administrative projects. Key elements common to multiple systems should be defined centrally. Integrity of data must be a campus standard." (CCIT)

 

"All relevant UCB internal information databases need to be made available at the desktop to faculty and staff. These include financial information systems, especially those related to sponsored research accounts, and campus information systems such as those related to student and faculty population. The goal should be to reach a system of almost paper less interaction with all databases as soon as possible. IAA-SPI

 

"University databases should be available in electronic form when possible, using the same principles for dissemination as those that govern paper-based materials." {CCIT}

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

"CNS provides multi-tiered support for administrative system needs for the Boulder campus. In addition to communication and information services . . . administrative support includes the following:

* technical support and infrastructure for general campus systems (i.e., systems that provide benefit to the entire campus such as CUline-PLUS, an online information service for students

 

* consulting services for departments interested in investigating their options for pursuing automated solutions for administrative processing needs

* project management for all] systems development work with which CNS is involved

* recharge resources (analysis, programming, equipment and infrastructure) for department-specific administrative systems." rcns-ssl

 

"Departments have begun developing desktop systems as technology has become more robust at the desktop and as the University's central systems' data becomes available through CU's data warehouse." {CNS-SS}

 

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"UMS is the central provider of administrative computing applications for the four-campus University of Colorado system. The majority of the administrative systems operate on an IBM-compatible mainframe system, using Systems Network Architecture (SNA) to provide interactive and batch access to database applications. Examples of the administrative applications include general ledger, payroll and personnel records, student records and billing, and a full range of financial applications. Recently UMS has installed systems on UNIX platforms, where the access method is TCP/IP protocols. Current systems development and analysis has favored client/server structure as opposed to current legacy system design." {DC-SP)

 

NEEDS

 

"The. ability to further enhance administrative services through automated solutions is limited by the funding available to departments." (CNS-SS}

 

"Coordinating security between systems that share data is a weak point, particularly if the multiple systems involve multiple system security administrators. Users must also contend with multiple logons, passwords, and access rights. The campus itself has a designated security coordinator, but the individual's role and authority are riot clearly defined beyond acting upon security requests submitted by departmental security administrators." (CNS-SSJ

 

"Interoperability and compatibility are important issues and are affected by de facto and collaborative standards. The four campuses and UMS need to work collectively to plan and implement standards." {DC-SP}

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

2.2 Budget plans should be developed that facilitate all departments/units on campus having equipment and connectivity necessary to use on-line administrative services.

 

2.3 Planning and implementation of systems that provide more on-line services to students must be pursued aggressively.

 

2.4 Planning and implementation of systems that provide more on-line access for faculty and staff to administrative databases must be pursued.

 

2.5 Data and systems standards, on campus and among the four campuses, should be assured by an ongoing oversight mechanism.

 

2.6 Attention to security needs, on campus and among the four campuses, should be assured by an ongoing oversight mechanism.

 

1 2C. A locus of responsibility for the institution's is digital information has been identified

I

 

OBJECTIVES

 

There is coordination of the provision and maintenance of administrative data.

 

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"Data management policies, processes, and procedures must be established . . . [and] a process must be developed to identify administrative data required for emerging management needs. Administrative data should be easily accessible to management." (CCr

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

No specific unit or individual has this as an explicit responsibility.

 

NEEDS

 

"Data management policies, processes, and procedures must be administered by a designated department on the campus." (CCrT)

 

"Responsibility for administrative data should be assigned to specific departments. Responsibility includes data quality (integrity), production, security and accessibility, and training in the use of administrative data." occurs

 

ACTION ITEM

 

2.7 Provision must be made for campus-centralized coordination of the provision and maintenance of administrative data.

 

3. ACCESS

 

X 3A. Faculty and staff office connectivity and hardware |

OBJECTIVES

 

"Every faculty member . . . and appropriate staff person at UCB, should have a desktop computer with on-line access to the Internet from his or her normal work space on campus or at home. The computer should include a color screen which is adequate for providing World Wide Web access, . . . maintained and upgraded as needed. Access on demand must be available 100% of the time.... Where research funding is not available (for example in many humanities departments) basic computer equipment and access should be provided to faculty and staff by UCB." {AA-SP}

 

CURRENT STATUS & NEEDS

 

It is estimated, based on studies and purchasing records, that about one-third of all faculty, and a majority of staff offices, have computers that are www browser capable. Many others have obsolete machines adequate for basic tasks such as word processing.

 

ACTION ITEM

 

3.1 A first priority of CPBIT is to develop a plan and budget proposal for the on-going provision of a "Web-browser" capable computer to every faculty member and to appropriate staff members. A 4 year renewal cycle should be contemplated.

 

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3B. Student connectivity and hardware

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"Every . . . student . . . should have a desktop computer with . . . access to the Internet . . . The computer should include a color screen which is adequate for providing World Wide Web access. Students should be required to acquire a computer, with UCB providing the access component on campus." {AA-SP)

 

"Residence hall networking generates revenue, [satisfies] students, reduces demand on open labs, provides better access to faculty [and to network services], enhances learning and adds value." {CAUSE}

 

"Workstations should be placed in the UMC student-group offices to encourage participation in student groups and collaborative use of the resource."

{AA-SPI

CURRENT STATUS

 

A pilot project is providing ethernet access to five "Quad" residence halls predominantly occupied by engineering students.

 

There is no requirement that UCB students must own a computer. NEEDS

 

"The lack of network access in the residence halls continues to be a serious deficiency for the campus." {CNS-SS)

 

"There is continuous demand for more labs and keyboards, mainly for student use. Waiting lines exist in many labs, especially during "crunch" times. In some buildings, the College of Business, for example, students report that it is impossible to gain access to a computer between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. without waiting in line. (CNS-SSI

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

3.2 A financial plan should be developed to fund expansion of the current pilot project of ethernet access to all residence halls.

 

3.3 Continued development of more student labs should be pursued.

 

3.4 "UCB should consider offering . . . a computer with the financial aid package, which helps finance IT through student loans." (AA-SP}

 

3C. departmental Resources l OBJECTIVES

 

"Since many disciplines cannot support their information technology acquisitions through external research funding, more funding and support for instructional technology in these areas must be provided institutionally. This may include qualified technical support staff for specialized applications as well as specialized equipment." {AA-SPI

 

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"For the most part, consistent with other forms of research support, research computing is carried out as a decentralized, departmental activity.... [However,] in recognition that the availability of external research funds differs from discipline to discipline, the campus should develop a means of providing funding to allow faculty to be able to use appropriate technology, especially in the humanities and social sciences." {CCITJ

 

"Provision of large-scale research computing is not a Boulder campus priority. However, access to such computing should be facilitated." occur}

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

Most departments have some type of local area network, although it is not always formally supported by a "LAN manager."

 

A new vBNS connection provides high-speed access to national super-computing facilities and other research universities.

 

NEEDS

 

"Some small departments do not have the funds necessary to pay for network connections nor for the desktop workstations." {CNS-SS)

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

3.5 Consideration must be given to providing departmental budgets adequate to support IT access, especially in the humanities and social sciences.

 

3.6 Every local area network should have an individual formally designated and trained as a LAN manager, with adequate time defined in that individual's job description to accomplish this task.

 

3D. academic facilities and scholarly resources |

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"The role of the library in the academy is. .. [expanding] from acquiring material . . . to providing access to information and material beyond the library walls. Future information sources will likely demand payment per access, and thus a plan is required to provide adequate, flexible funding to support this. Also, continued funding for upgraded hardware, software, and networking capability, as well as people to facilitate the use of information technology, must be provided for the Libraries to expand to meet the future information needs of UCB faculty and students." {AA-SPI

 

"Scholarly information resources [should be] provided in electronic form where appropriate, and are . . . selected through an organized planning process, guided by written policies and procedures that include collaboration among users and library and computing professionals." {HEIR

 

"Resources that serve broad and diverse communities, such as the campus libraries . . . must be allocated to maximize usage and benefit. Wherever possible, such resources should be provided at levels necessary to accommodate the

 

20

typical user.... Access to IT-based material should be free to members of the academic community to the greatest extent possible, in the same manner as other library materials.... Many forms of IT-based scholarly material should be acquired and/or managed by the Libraries in much the same way as books and journals. The decision process to acquire or access these resources will be the same as for other library materials." {CCIT}

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

"The University Libraries maintain electronic bibliographic records, CD-ROM collections, and research facilities. A large number of departments maintain their own computing facilities for academic work. The ALTEC multimedia lab, for example, supports foreign language programs." {CNS-SS}

 

"CNS works with the University Libraries to provide access to scholarly information resources, though the amount of interaction between the Libraries and other information providers is limited." /CNS-SS}

 

NEEDS

 

There is need for planning, written policies. and procedures in support of provision of scholarly "content" as distinguished from the technical infrastructure.over which it is delivered.

 

"Bibliographers will be responsible for acquiring stand-alone and network based collections of scholarly information in electronic form." (CCIT}

 

ACTION ITEM

 

3.7 CPBIT should work with the Dean of Libraries and the Libraries faculty advisory committee to assure planning, written policies. and procedures in support of provision of scholarly "content." This should include a budget plan that coordinates Libraries IT expenses with other Campus IT expenses.

 

3E. Labs and Kiosks on campus

 

OBJECTIVES

 

Provide access to basic services from kiosks across campus.

 

Provide access to advanced services from student labs.

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

There is "access, via more than 60 kiosks.... CNS develops and maintains more than 30 computer labs for teaching and for individual work as well as 28 specialized labs for department-specific work.... The labs are equipped with 532 Intel-based machines, 80 UNIX-based machines, and 521 Macintoshes and are maintained by a staff of 4.5 FTE plus 3.5 student FTE. The labs are available between 20 and 576 hours per week and are used for classes, recitations, TA office hours, and individual work. Instructional computing laboratories are designed and upgraded in collaboration with faculty members and deans to serve academic programs. Hardware and software are chosen to satisfy the

 

21

requirements of the courses being taught. In addition, a number of multi-user systems are dedicated to providing support for instruction.... All CNS labs are connected to the campus network." {CNS-SS)

 

"The distribution of terminal based kiosks and network connected computers throughout the Campus provides easy access that is a model for Boulder's peers to follow. ACNS-ERC)

 

Kiosks are being upgraded to full Web access using a gift from the last graduating class.

 

NEEDS

 

"Demand for information resources continues to outrun available funding. For example, ICWG (Instructional Computing Working Group), the committee that allocates funds for building and upgrading computing labs, receives five times [in dollar amount] the requests that can actually be funded." {CNS-SS)

 

ACTION ITEM

 

3.8 Strong consideration should be given to increasing the student computing fee to meet demand for more student-used labs, as well as more kiosks, and machines in student-group offices. This should be pursued by the CPBIT and the CIO for inclusion in the next budget cycle.

 

3F. Dial-in from off campus j OBJECTIVES

 

Modem users should be able to dial in with a high probability of achieving a connection.

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

A fee-based service from a private contractor is being negotiated. It is intended to be an augmentation of the current modem pool.

 

NEEDS

 

"The university should negotiate a contract with local cable or telephone companies to provide . . . access at [the highest speed available] for off-campus students . . . [and] for faculty from their homes." {AA-SP}

 

"Insure adequate off-campus access to campus systems." (DC-SP) ACTION ITEM

 

3.9 Results of the newly contracted, paid access for modems should be monitored closely.

 

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-

3G. Common software j

OBJECTIVES

 

"Campus-wide software licenses for popular packages, should be acquired . . . and made available on-line along with the latest versions of important freeware." {AA-SP)

 

"Every effort must be made to provide shared software through the negotiation of license agreements for applications such as statistical or mathematical packages employed by researchers in different fields and departments." {CCIT}

 

[CNS will] track and deploy the next generation of network protocols . . . promote standards for user application software that operates across the network through: (a) assembling a blueprint of interoperable software layers; (b) negotiating site licenses, and (c) training and documentation." {CNS-SP}

 

"Establish integrated stacks of applications on workstations." {DC-SP}

 

"Develop cross-platform solutions for the most common applications." {DC-SP}

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

CNS maintains site-licenses--when available--for the most commonly used software packages and some mathematical applications.

 

NEEDS

 

Advanced software packages used intensively by a modest number of campus groups--and often expensive--need to be considered for site licensing.

 

ACTION ITEM

 

3.10 Budget provisions should be made for acquiring a broader range of site-licensed software.

 

1 4. EXTENDED BOUNDARIES

 

4A. Distance and lifelong learning l

OBJECTIVES

 

"The Internet presents new opportunities to UCB to extend our traditional reach. Internet outreach offers the possibility of serving Western Slope students as effectively as Eastern Slope. For that matter, students could participate as easily from any location world-wide." {AA-SP}

 

"UCB should take a leadership role in the new Western Governors University." {AA-SP}

 

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CURRENT STATUS & NEEDS

 

The Division of Continuing Education, through its CATECS and Independent Study Programs, has made a serious commitment to the delivery of instruction through live TV broadcast, videotape, satellite, and the Internet.

 

CATECS offers courses through seven engineering departments, such as aerospace engineering, computer science and telecommunications. Live microwave CATECS broadcasts are made available to 28 business and industry sites in Colorado. In addition, there are over 200 sites across the country that receive videotapes of CATECS courses. Internet courses offered through Independent Study are designed to exploit the features of the WWW to add value to the instructional process and enhance inquiry and discourse. Currently, a limited number of Internet courses are offered in anthropology, business, communication, economics, geography, and sociology.

 

Under its new Dean, additional offerings will be developed, especially ones that extend unique UCB resources beyond the campus.

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

4.1 Work closely with the Dean of Continuing Education in planning for additional distance learning offerings by UCB.

 

4.2 Actively monitor developments regarding the Western Governors University.

 

4B. Outreach activities |

 

OBJECTIVES

 

Where possible without the inappropriate use of resources, IT providers should support the service mission of the University.

 

"The provision of CU-Boulder information technology resources to other higher education institutions, local communities, and private corporations is a component of its service mission.... [This] can include technical consultation and assistance in establishing local community or regional networks, electronic data exchange, access to CU personnel and data bases, and, in prescribed circumstances, access to computing resources. The costs of providing such . . . [service] must be carefully considered." {CCIT}

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

UCB, through the work of "CNS has assumed a leadership role in both regional and national networking. It houses Westnet, the six-state consortium of Internet access. CNS is a principal in the NSF-sponsored K-12 testbed in the Boulder Valley School District (BVSD). It is also the center of the Boulder Community Network (BCN). It has also been the catalyst and operator for the State of Colorado Web presence." (CNS-SS}

 

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"A number of applications developed by CNS have emerged as widely respected benchmarks. These include management systems built for Telecommunications Services, Wardenburg Student Health Center, and the Faculty Information System." {CNS-SS}

 

"In general, [its] research and outreach efforts place... [UCB} in a truly unique position [nationally]. . . Among the positive benefits are visibility for the University, academic programs with opportunities for research and instruction, and ability to shape national solutions that work locally." (CNS-ERC}

 

NEEDS

 

Maintaining such activities.

 

ACTION ITEM

 

4.3 Work with the campus IT community to identify and support unique opportunities for service outreach activities.

 

1 5. INSTITUTION WIDE PLANNING AND IT MANAGEMENT I

 

5A. A locus of responsibility IT for has been identified.

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"It is critical that a unified administrative infrastructure be created to guide and support IT on the UCB campus, directed by an identified administrator who will oversee all aspects of IT planning and development on a continuing basis. It should be stressed that innovations in the use of IT come from individuals, not from an IT central administration. The proposed administrative structure is intended to enable and enhance individuals, not to control or dictate to them." {AA-SPJ

 

"The position of Chief Information Officer, or some similar title, should be created and filled on the Boulder Campus. This individual should be responsible for the management, direction, and coordination of information technology. A reorganization of information technology should occur under the leadership of this individual. The Chief Information Officer should report either to the Chancellor or to one or more of the Vice Chancellors. If the latter, there should be an advisory path directly to the Chancellor." {CNS-PRPI

 

"The willingness of the University to address IT structural and procedural issues will determine its ability to compete effectively in the increasingly IT-intensive international scholarly environment. Strong leadership is required to meet the IT vision.... The Boulder campus needs significant senior management involvement in setting IT policy and direction.... the Chancellor [should] establish a Boulder Campus Policy Board on Information Technology (CPBIT) and charge it to review management, coordinate planning, consider budget requests, and make recommendations to the chancellor concerning Boulder campus policy and resource allocations for IT." (CCIT}

 

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"Have ONE advisory committee at the 'VP' level." {CAUSE

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

The position of CIO has been assumed by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, reporting in this new role to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and the Vice Chancellor for Administration. The CIO chairs a reorganized CPBIT and is responsible for facilitating the coordination of and planning for campus wide IT. This arrangement is to be assessed at the end of the 1996-97 Academic Year.

 

NEEDS

 

A clear mission statement for CPBIT must be promulgated.

 

A procedure for evaluation of the CIO position needs to be defined.

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

5.1 CPBIT should be involved in an evaluation procedure for the CIO position.

 

5.2 CPBIT should use prior campus reports as the basis for developing a mission statement that is accepted by the Chancellor and Cabinet.

 

; 5B. Appropriate advisory and policy committees exist to provide guidance and I direction in the development and use of institutional information resources.

Involvement of all major user organizations,faculty, senior administrators, librarians, It professionals, staff and students is insured.

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"The institution's mission and vision statement articulates the role and degree of importance information resources play in its academic and administrative programs.... [and] planning for information resources [is] incorporated into the institution wide strategic planning process." {HEIR

 

"Information and its related technologies are major campus resources. These resources are used to support and guide the achievement of the strategic goals of the campus.... Information and its related technologies are major University assets. The University invests in information technology and manages IT in a coordinated and effective way." {CCITI

 

"Opportunity costs, organizational efficiencies and change, and potential extended values of information technology investments must be systematically assessed before making acquisitions." (CCIT}

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

The wide variety of plans and reports cited at the start of this working paper are indicative of the importance the institution places on IT. This is reinforced by the new charge to CPBIT to oversee the implementation of these plans.

 

"In addition to CPBIT a number of other groups allow user communities to be involved in decisions involving the development or modification of applications.

 

26

For example, CNS' Administrative Systems Group uses a system design and implementation process for administrative systems." RCNS-SSI

 

NEEDS

 

CPBIT needs to establish procedures that assure it has input to all major IT decisions made on campus.

 

"Coordination of IT is a management function that should be clearly defined in the Boulder campus administrative structure." (CCIT} Mechanisms beyond CPBIT are needed to assure coordinated planning among the IT providers.

 

"IT projects with significant impact on the common-good infrastructure should be referred to CPBIT for consideration." /CCITJ

 

"A campus resource allocation process must be developed that will foster investment in IT across Boulder campus units through use of linked and shared funding mechanisms, fees and charging mechanisms, subsidies, and budgeted allocations.... CPBIT needs to develop an IT budgeting process that addresses these issues." {CCITI

 

"The Boulder campus must provide organizational support for CPBIT." {CCITJ

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

5.3 Assure that formal mechanisms are in place to do coordinated planning among the various IT provider groups, involving CPBIT as appropriate.

 

5C. There is adequate and stable funding to support the institution's continuing

go commitments to electronic information resources, including capital replacement I

funding and annual budget allocations for upgrading and maintenance.

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"The Boulder campus needs to consider investments in IT in the same manner as it views other investments to maximize productivity and effectiveness." fCCIT}

 

"A well-developed planning process which is tied to the institutional budgeting process is in place for information resources, involving faculty, senior administrators, librarians, information technology professionals, students, and others as needed." (IXEIR}

 

"The Boulder Campus should commit to a multi-year staged plan that builds budget and staffing of CNS toward a level commensurate with the Campus' needs and comparable with peer institutions.... Various sources should be considered in order to provide the additional budget required, including a student computing fee comparable to that on-similar campuses in the U.S., increases in differential tuition for computing-intensive academic units, and reasonable internal charges for CNS services." {CNS-PRP}

 

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CURRENT STATUS

 

"Funding for information technology has remained flat for the past four years. Funding for the data communications infrastructure is a mix of CNS budget and subsidy from telephone services. Each year the data and communications working group identifies networking needs that far outstrip available funding. Departmental specific computing is dependent upon the individual department's budget." (CNS-SS)

 

"Given the relatively small budget and staff and the wide range of services delivered. . . put simply, the Campus is lucky that it is not getting the computing it is paying for." {CNS-ERCJ

 

NEEDS

 

"Budgeting such investments by individual IT units is likely to be insufficient and ineffective. Such efforts must receive either off-the-top funding or funding through a linked mechanism that is based on cross-departmental support.... The campus needs to develop a management structure and process for investing in and managing IT resources as strategic resources." rca

 

ACTION ITEM

 

5.4 A first priority of CPBIT should be to develop a coordinated budget presentation for all IT activities in time for the AY 96-97 budget planning cycle. This should include working with all major IT providers and users.

 

| 6. ADVISORY AND POLICY STRUCTURE

 

6A. Policies and procedures are in place to promote legal, responsible

and secure use of IT resources by individuals, by campus

organizations, and by the institution

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"Written policies and procedures exist regarding appropriate and authorized use of computing resources and network access, such as a rights and responsibilities statement. Policies and procedures exist that encourage the legal and ethical uses of electronic information resources by all members of the institutional community, and, where sanctions are applied, principles of due process are followed." (HEIR

 

"Policies and procedures exist to ensure the integrity and security of information used by faculty, staff, and students. Rules and procedures regarding access and use of data strike an appropriate balance among an individual's right to privacy, the institution's imperative to operate efficiently, and, in the case of public institutions, the rights of citizens to information about their government. Procedures for gaining or granting access to information are clearly stated and consistently and equitably applied" /HEIR)

 

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"The use of IT is guided by a Boulder campus code of ethics that addresses the laws and practices of responsible behavior concerning fair use, privacy, intellectual property rights, and censorship. It is the responsibility of each IT user to be familiar with this code, and to abide by it to avoid infringing upon the rights of other users." {CCITI

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

"CNS has a written policy that is mounted on the CNS Web site and is provided to new users before they receive an account.... University Management Systems (UMS) has a written policy. Most departments with their own servers restrict usage to departmental users but do not have policy statements." {CNS-SSJ

 

The University system has a published policy on e-mail use. All policies relevant to IT are linked to the Campus WWW Home Page.

 

"CNS has set permissions on systems and developed internal procedures for the physical security of its systems. Password utilities have been modified to require users to have hardened passwords.... Administrative systems developed by CNS have an extensive security scheme, combining system, functional and data permissions.... The general philosophy is to make information available to staff to enable them to perform their jobs, but to educate them on personnel and student privacy rules." /CNS-SSI

 

"The campus network has been partitioned through the use of routers so that student labs are unable to snoop packets from administrative areas. In addition, there are partitions between buildings and, frequently, between departments within a building. There is not, however, blocking on a per port basis, due to the cost of switched hubs." {CNS-SSI

 

"Departments are responsible for setting their own security processes for resources that they control, although these processes must conform with the campus-wide policies. Some individual departments, such as Wardenburg Student Health Center, have clear policies regarding use of information, while others have no such statements on acceptable use, data privacy, etc." {CNS-SS)

 

NEEDS

 

As opposed to the situation with policies, "procedures are largely undefined, with University Legal Counsel, the Office of Student Conduct, and CNS. . . [unsure] about proper procedures to follow in case of possible misuse.... Emerging areas for policy (such as student Web page issues), and enforcement mechanisms go unaddressed. There are no consistent procedures for adjudication. Disagreements on interpretation mean that problems are not always resolved." {CNS-SSI

 

"There need to be alternatives developed to allow departments to remedy security problems at a reasonable cost. There is no integration of security efforts between UMS, CNS, and departments." {CNS-SS)

 

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"CPBIT will direct the development of procedures for identifying abuses and for the adjudication of cases related to such abuses." {CCIT}

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

6.1 Work with relevant Campus units to develop procedures for the enforcement of all IT usage policies.

 

6.2 CPBIT should work with relevant units to develop new IT usage policies as necessary.

 

7. STAFFING

 

7A. Provision is made for adequate staff in It provider units, both centrally and in divisional, school, or department units close to users,

| for internal operations and user support

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"Support and training [are] provided to help faculty and students learn to use and effectively apply . . . [IT] resources. /HEIR}

 

"It is the responsibility of campus IT units to be responsive to common needs and provide solutions that meet the requirements of the user.... The creative tension between the common good and unique needs will be recognized by supporting them as well as possible within resource constraints, and consistent with the common mission of the University." occurs

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

"CNS provides a number of user support services, including computing advisors, documentation, short courses, and consulting. The unit publishes (both online and in hardcopy) a newsletter six times a year for campus computer users, and user documentation over a broad range of help topics is provided both electronically and as hardcopy. Training classes are conducted in informal, workshop settings as well as in regular classes. Consultants for scientific/numerical computing and statistical computing assist with more technical needs. CNS is in the process of developing a Web-based help service for network problems." (CNS-SS}

 

"CNS staffing has grown in relatively slow proportion to demand. Some staff . . . have had significant percentages of their time shift from auxiliary to general fund ... in order to insure that campus-wide interests were [met].... To cope with the rapid demand curves, CNS has resorted to conversion of capital into staffing. Much of this funding has gone into hiring the student employees for BugBusters, workstation support, and advising." rcns-ss}

 

"User departments for central systems (such as the Financial Reporting System and Payroll) provide some training on their systems. The quality, nature and

 

30

frequency of the training is up to the user department. Continuing Education provides training for desktop applications." {CNS-SS}

 

"Academic departments often do not give rudimentary instruction in technology to their students and instead rely on the CNS advisors for this instruction. Similarly, administrative departments need to provide some in-house support for desktop systems before relying on the BugBusters." {CNS-SS)

 

NEEDS

 

"There are pressing staffing needs for CNS, particularly in student hourly to relieve the stress on BugBuster and workstation services. Regular staff are also needed in several areas to address the ongoing growth of demand.... CNS user support is generally aimed at a very broad base of users; more than 7,000 new students each year place heavy demands on existing support, and most of CNS' support resources are needed for broad-based training." {CNS-SS}

 

"Training generally addresses the beginning rudimentary skill levels. There are a few more advanced classes in specific area . . . Because the training CNS does provide is by technical engineering staff rather than trained teachers, it often falls short. The is no central organization for training, so it is spotty and inconsistent at best.... [However] Continuing Education as well as some departments provide more in-depth and higher skill-level training, from beginning literacy to advanced." {CNS-SS}

 

"CNS offers a number of training opportunities. introductory workshops for new students, a series of brown bag seminars aimed primarily at administrative users, a series of classes for scientific computer users, and a series for statistical computing users. In addition to these efforts, CNS staff often are asked to do presentations for regular classes on a variety of topics, from getting started with e-mail to more technical subjects." {CNS-SS)

 

"It is clear that CNS cannot supply all of the support needs of departments. It is imperative that departments plan for and budget to meet technological needs, including ongoing support." {CNS-SS}

 

ACTION ITEM

 

7.1 Work with CNS and other IT providers and users to develop a coordinated strategy for provision of user support, including budget planning for the increases in support staff that are necessary.

 

7B Support services—documentation, development, consultation,

training maintenance—meet the needs of institutional users when

new technologies are acquired

 

OBJECTIVES

 

"UCB should provide a mechanism for ongoing support of upgrades for hardware and software for desktop computers and networking, and for the provision of qualified technical staff as needed to interact with users." {AA-SP}

 

31

"Invest in IT staff training to support new technologies." {CAUSE)

 

CURRENT STATUS

 

"[CNS Supports] LAN Captains, a group of users on campus who gather periodically and also use e-mail to discuss their duties of supporting their departments' computer users and networks.... CNS's Administrative Systems Group (ASG) does provide training and system documentation for all administrative systems developed and implemented by CNS/ASG. Support for these systems is provided on a charge-out basis throughout the life of the system." {CNS-SS}

 

NEEDS

 

"There will be a growing need for training and support with use of client server applications, and with more advanced data communications applications." (DC-SPI

 

ACTION ITEMS

 

7.2 [CNS will] "develop training programs and implement new interactive training tools and acquire and provide access to training tapes." {CNS-SP

 

7.3 Ongoing, funded, regular training for IT staff should be assured.

 

32

SUMMARY OF ACTION ITEMS - BY TOPIC t

 

1. ACADEMIC PROGRAM SUPPORT |

 

1.1 Develop financial mechanisms to continuously upgrade the campus backbone and network.

 

1.2 "Create testbeds for new networking technologies such as ATM and wireless data communications.... [and] develop a distributed computing environment and the services it offers. . . [including] secure hosts and networks, authentication, institutional file system, and institutional backup system." {CNS-SP}

 

1.3 Assure that a campus policy exists concerning intra-building fiber, and that it is regularly reexamined in light of technical advances.

 

1.4 Assure that costs associated with upgrading the reliability of the campus network are considered whenever major projects require increased reliability.

 

1.5 "Use of uninterruptable power supplies should be expanded to include all new hub sites and any location that serves as a central network service point. A power outage in one building should not affect users whose network connections do not terminate in that building but are simply routed through." {DC-SP)

 

1.6 Devise a budget plan to increase smart classrooms at least two per year, preferably at a rate of ten or more per year.

 

1.7 Actively encourage all UCB community members and units to provide Web-based access, as appropriate, to their materials.

 

1.8 Continued provision of core services should be assured and upgrades identified as they become technically feasible.

 

1.9 Determine the needs for and cost of a UCB central data mass-storage facility for scholarly and instructional use.

 

1.10 Continue to increase support for the ITRC, based on assessed need.

 

1.11 Faculty evaluation committees at all levels should incorporate recognition for the development of instructional IT into their proceedings.

 

1.12 CNS will "investigate communications services, including video conferencing, integrated communication servers, and other tools as they emerge and lead discussions on deployment strategies." {CNS-SP)

 

1.13 Attention should be given to determining and influencing faculty perceptions about the role of IT in the institutional culture.

 

1.14 Assistance with electronic publishing, possibly through a centralized service, should be explored.

 

 

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4 2. ADMINISTRATIVE USER SUPPORT

 

2.1 The UCB administrators responsible for campus aspects of the system wide Administrative Streamlining Process should ensure that the technical and financial IT concerns of the campus are adequately understood and addressed.

 

2.2 Budget plans should be developed that facilitate all departments/units on campus having equipment and connectivity necessary to use on-line administrative services.

 

2.3 Planning and implementation of systems that provide more on-line services to students must be pursued aggressively.

 

2.4 Planning and implementation of systems that provide more on-line access for faculty and staff to administrative databases must be pursued.

 

2.5 Data and systems standards, on campus and among the four campuses, should be assured by an ongoing oversight mechanism.

 

2.6 Attention to security needs, on campus and among the four campuses, should be assured by an ongoing oversight mechanism.

 

2.7 Provision must be made for campus-centralized coordination of the provision and maintenance of administrative data.

 

3. ACCESS l

 

3.1 A first priority of CPBIT is to develop a plan and budget proposal for the on-going provision of a "Web-browser" capable computer to every faculty member and to appropriate staff members. A 4 year renewal cycle should be contemplated.

 

3.2 A financial plan should be developed to fund expansion of the current pilot project of ethernet access to all residence halls.

 

3.3 Continued development of more student labs should be pursued.

 

3.4 "UCB should consider offering . . . a computer with the financial aid package, which helps finance IT through student loans." zAA-srl

 

3.5 Consideration must be given to providing departmental budgets adequate to support IT access, especially in the humanities and social sciences.

 

3.6 Every local area network should have an individual formally designated and trained as a LAN manager, with adequate time defined in that individual s job description to accomplish this task.

 

3.7 CPBIT should work with the Dean of Libraries and the Libraries faculty advisory committee to assure planning, written policies. and procedures in support of provision of scholarly "content." This should include a budget plan that coordinates Libraries IT expenses with other Campus IT expenses.

 

34

3.8 Strong consideration should be given to increasing the student computing fee to meet demand for more student-used labs, as well as more kiosks, and machines in student-group offices. This should be pursued by the CPBIT and the CIO for inclusion in the next budget cycle.

 

3.9 Results of the newly contracted, paid access for modems should be monitored closely.

 

3.10 Budget provisions should be made for acquiring a broader range of site licensed software.

 

4. EXTENDED BOUNDARIES .

 

4.1 Work closely with the Dean of Continuing Education in planning for additional distance learning offerings by UCB.

 

4.2 Actively monitor developments regarding the Western Governors University.

 

4.3 Work with the campus IT community to identify and support unique opportunities for service outreach activities.

 

r

L 5. INSTITUTION WIDE PLANNING AND IT MANAGEMENT l

 

5.1 CPBIT should be involved in an evaluation procedure for the CIO position.

 

5.2 CPBIT should use prior campus reports as the basis for developing a mission statement that is accepted by the Chancellor and Cabinet.

 

5.3 Assure that formal mechanisms are in place to do coordinated planning among the various IT provider groups, involving CPBIT as appropriate.

 

5.4 A first priority of CPBIT should be to develop a coordinated budget presentation for all IT activities in time for the AY 96-97 budget planning cycle. This should include working with all major IT providers and users.

 

6. ADVISORY AND POLICY STRUCTURE

 

6.1 Work with relevant Campus units to develop procedures for the enforcement of all IT usage policies.

 

6.2 Work with relevant units to develop new IT usage policies as necessary.

 

I

1 7. STAFFING I

I

 

7.1 Work with CNS and other IT providers and users to develop a coordinated strategy for provision of user support, including budget planning for the increases in support staff that are necessary.

 

35

7.2 [CNS will] "develop training programs and implement new interactive training tools and acquire and provide access to training tapes." (CNS-SPJ

 

7.3 Ongoing, funded, regular training for IT staff should be assured.

 

SUMMARY OF ACTION ITEMS - BY WORKING GROUP

 

Action Items are rearranged in this section to indicate--in approximate priority order-- the ones each working group or the CIO will address as their primary responsibility. (The number in parenthesis at the end of each item refers to its identity in the above list.)

 

Teaching, Learning and Scholarly IT Concerns

 

P1. A first priority of CPBIT is to develop a plan and budget proposal for the on-going provision of a "Web-browser" capable computer to every faculty member and to appropriate staff members. A 4 year renewal cycle should be contemplated. (3.1)

 

P2. Continue to increase support for the ITRC, based on assessed need. (1.10)

 

P3. Attention should be given to determining and influencing faculty perceptions about the role of IT in the institutional culture. (1.13)

 

P4. Faculty evaluation committees at all levels should incorporate recognition for the development of instructional IT into their proceedings. (1.11)

 

P5. CPBIT should work with the Dean of Libraries and the Libraries faculty advisory committee to assure planning, written policies. and procedures in support of provision of scholarly "content." This should include a budget plan that coordinates Libraries IT expenses with other Campus IT expenses. (3.7)

 

P6. Assistance with electronic publishing, possibly through a centralized service, should be explored. (1.14)

 

P7. Determine the needs for and cost of a UCB central data mass-storage facility for scholarly and instructional use. (1.9)

 

P8. Work closely with the Dean of Continuing Education in planning for additional distance learning offerings by UCB. (4.1)

 

P9. Work with the campus IT community to identify and support unique opportunities for service outreach activities. (4.3)

 

36

| Administrative and Student-Life IT Concerns and Resources |

l

n. Strong consideration should be given to increasing the student computing fee to meet demand for more student-used labs, as well as more kiosks, and machines in student-group offices. This should be pursued by the CPBIT and the CIO for inclusion in the next budget cycle. (3.8)

 

P2. Continued development of more student labs should be pursued. (3.3)

 

P3. The UCB administrators responsible for campus aspects of the system wide Administrative Streamlining Process should ensure that the technical and financial IT concerns of the campus are adequately understood and addressed. (2.1)

 

P4. Planning and implementation of systems that provide more on-line services to students must be pursued aggressively. (2.3)

 

P5. Planning and implementation of systems that provide more on-line access for faculty and staff to administrative databases must be pursued. (2.4)

 

P6. Provision must be made for campus-centralized coordination of the provision and maintenance of administrative data. (2.7)

 

P7. UCB should consider offering a computer with the financial aid package, which helps finance IT through student loans. (3.4)

 

IT Usage Policies and Procedures

 

P1. Work with relevant Campus units to develop procedures for the enforcement of all IT usage policies. (6.1)

 

P2. Work with relevant units to develop new IT usage policies as necessary. (6.2)

 

P3. Attention to security needs, on campus and among the four campuses, should be assured by an ongoing oversight mechanism. (2.6)

 

P4. Data and systems standards, on campus and among the four campuses, should be assured by an ongoing oversight mechanism. (2.5)

 

Core IT Infrastructure Providers Group | n. A financial plan should be developed to fund expansion of the current pilot project of ethernet access to all residence halls. (3.2)

 

P2. Continued provision of core services should be assured and upgrades identified as they become technically feasible. (1.8)

 

P3. Assure that formal mechanisms are in place to do coordinated planning among the various IT provider groups, involving CPBIT as appropriate. (5.3)

 

37

P4. Work with CNS and other IT providers and users to develop a coordinated strategy for provision of user support, including budget planning for the increases in support staff that are necessary. (7.1)

 

P5. Assure that costs associated with upgrading the reliability of the campus network are considered whenever major projects require increased reliability. (1.4)

 

P6. Assure that a campus policy exists concerning intra-building fiber, and that it is regularly reexamined in light of technical advances. (1.3)

 

P7. CNS will investigate communications services, including video conferencing, integrated communication servers, and other tools as they emerge and lead discussions on deployment strategies. (1.12)

 

P8. Create testbeds for new networking technologies such as ATM and wireless. data communications and develop a distributed computing environment and the services it offers, including secure hosts and networks, authentication, institutional file system, and institutional backup system. (1.2)

 

P9. Use of uninterruptable power supplies should be expanded to include all new hub sites and any location that serves as a central network service point. A power outage in one building should not affect users whose network connections do not terminate in that building but are simply routed through. (1.5)

no. Budget provisions should be made for acquiring a broader range of site-licensed software. (3.10)

 

P11. Results of the newly contracted, paid access for modems should be monitored closely. (3.9)

 

n2. CNS will develop training programs and implement new interactive training tools and acquire and provide access to training tapes. (7.2)

 

P13. Ongoing, funded, regular training for IT staff should be assured. (7.3)

 

CIO

I

n. A first priority of CPBIT should be to develop a coordinated budget presentation for all IT activities in time for the AY 96-97 budget planning cycle. This should include working with all major IT providers and users. (5.4)

 

P2. Devise a budget plan to increase smart classrooms at least two per year, preferably at a rate of ten or more per year. (1.6)

 

P3. Develop financial mechanisms to continuously upgrade the campus backbone and network. (1.1)

 

P4. CPBIT should use prior campus reports as the basis for developing a mission statement that is accepted by the Chancellor and Cabinet. (5.2)

 

P5. Actively encourage all UCB community members and units to provide Web-based access, as appropriate, to their materials. (1.7)

 

38

P6. Budget plans should be developed that facilitate all departments/units on campus having equipment and connectivity necessary to use on-line administrative services. (2.2)

 

P7. Consideration must be given to providing departmental budgets adequate to support IT access, especially in the humanities and social sciences. (3.5)

 

P8. Every local area network should have an individual formally designated and trained as a LAN manager, with adequate time defined in that individual's job description to accomplish this task. (3.6)

 

P9. Actively monitor developments regarding the Western Governors University. (4.2)

 

P10. CUBIT should be involved in an evaluation procedure for the CIO position. (5.1)

 

39