Past IBS Colloquia & Events

2015:

Workshop: Wednesday, Jan 7, 9:00 AM - 12:00 Noon, IBS Computing Lab, Room 150
Introduction to NVivo
Kristi Jackson, Query Inc.
This session for beginners will provide a hands-on experience of importing, coding, memoing and linking in text files (interviews), as well as exporting the results. Depending on the needs of the group, we will also choose two other data types to code (photographs, pdf files, web pages, survey monkey, etc.)
Registration is required and is restricted to people who have had very little or no experience using NVivo.
Registration and Workshop Materials
Sponsored by Computing and Research Services
Workshop: Wednesday, Jan 7, 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM, IBS Computing Lab, Room 150
NVivo, Beyond the Basics
Kristi Jackson, Query Inc.
This session will begin with an open forum for advanced coding questions (e.g., coding as a team, customizing the node list, using queries to code). Then we will import demographic (or any nominal, ordinal or interval value) data for the purpose of comparing subpopulations. We will run at least 3 of the 7 queries.
Registration is required and is restricted to people who took the Introduction to NVivo earlier in the day or have had previous experience using NVivo.
Registration and Workshop Materials
Sponsored by Computing and Research Services
Workshop: Wednesday, Jan 14, 12:00 Noon - 2:00 PM, IBS Computing Lab, Room 150
Getting Started with R
Philip Pendergast, Computing and Research Services, IBS
This workshop will introduce participants to the R statistical programming language with an emphasis on data types, importing data, manipulating data (merging/sorting/subsetting/saving), performing simple statistical functions, and graphing. No prior experience with R is required to attend. Participants may bring their own data sets to work with, but a simple practice dataset will also be provided.
Registration is required.
Registration and Workshop Materials
Sponsored by Computing and Research Services
Thursday, Jan 22, 12:30 to 1:30 PM, Old Main Chapel
Trust in Scientists on Climate Change and Vaccines
Larry Hamilton, Professor of Sociology and Senior Fellow of the Carsey Institute, University of New Hampshire
Sponsored by CUPC
Friday, Jan 23, 11:00 AM - 12:00 Noon, IBS Room 155A
IBS Panel Series on Engaging in Interdisciplinary Research: Session 3
"Steps to Success: An Example of Interdisciplinary Translational Research to Reduce Youth Violence and Promote Positive Youth Development," Beverly Kingston (Director, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence) and colleagues
Closing discussion about conducting interdisciplinary research, facilitated by Professors Myron Gutmann and Richard Jessor
The Institute of Behavioral Science was established to advance understanding of important societal problems. The complexity of those problems has long defied the adequacy of any single discipline to be sufficiently illuminating. Consequently, it has been the paramount objective of IBS to promote interdisciplinary, collaborative research. The challenge of that objective, for all of us, lies in going beyond the traditions of the disciplines in which we have been trained, expanding our perspectives to encompass the orientations of other relevant disciplines, and establishing conceptual frameworks that are more inter- or trans-disciplinary in character. Not an easy task! Nor is the organization of a research project that involves collaborators from different disciplines. These are some of the challenges that will be explored in this panel series.
Thursday, Feb 5, 12:30 to 1:30 PM, IBS Room 155B
Resource Dynamics, Health, and Development in Early Childhood
Stef Mollborn, Dept. of Sociology and IBS
Sponsored by CUPC
Wednesday, Feb. 18, 1:00 - 2:30 PM, IBS Room 155B
IBS Panel on Nonacademic Careers (for graduate students and postdocs)
Dr. Carolyn Makinson, former Executive Director of the International Rescue Committee UK, CBE (Commander of the Order of the British Empire); Dr. Erin Trapp, CEO/Executive Director of Biennial of the Americas; Dr. Brandi Gilbert, Associate at Community Science, IBS alum; Dr. Rob Kemp, Demographer at Colorado State Demography Office, IBS alum; Dr. Casey Blalock, Statistical Programmer at Westat, IBS alum
Attendance is limited to the first 25 people who RSVP. Please RSVP to: kathryn.h.wright@colorado.edu.
Thursday, Feb 19, 1:30 to 2:30 PM, IBS Room 155B
Sources and Mechanisms of Favorable Neighborhood "Effects" on Mexican-American Health
Fernando Riosmena, Associate Professor of Geography and IBS
Sponsored by CUPC
Tuesday, February 24 ~ This session has been postponed.
Institute of Behavioral Science Research Symposium
Postdoc and Student Research Poster Session
Stop by to browse the posters anytime from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. An IBS-wide happy hour will be held from 4:00-5:30 p.m., and students/postdocs will be available to talk to people about their posters throughout the day.
Please RSVP to Steve if you plan to attend the happy hour: robert.graham@colorado.edu.
Thursday, Feb 26, 12:30 to 1:30 PM, IBS Room 155B
Gender and Health in Contemporary China
Susan Short, Professor of Sociology at Brown University
Flyer
Sponsored by CUPC
Monday, Mar 2, 3:00 to 4:30 PM, IBS Room 155A
Four Billion More People but Fewer Children: The Peculiar Demography of the 21st century and its Economic Implications
David Lam, Professor of Economics, Population Studies Center, University of Michigan
Abstract: According to U.N. projections, world population will increase by 4 billion people – from 7 billion to 11 billion – between 2010 and 2100. Can the world support another 4 billion people? To answer this question it is useful to look back at the period 1960-2010, when the world also added 4 billion people. There are important demographic differences between 21st-century population growth and 20th-century population growth. One of the most intriguing is that the number of children age 0-4 in 2100 is projected to be smaller than the number of children in 2010, in spite of the additional 4 billion people. While 20th-century population growth was dominated by growth in the number of children, 21st-century population growth will be dominated by growth of older age groups. This lecture will discuss how it is possible to add 4 billion people to the world without adding any more children. It will also discuss the economic implications of this unusual pattern of population growth. While earlier population growth led to increased demand for schools and put pressure on youth unemployment, 21st century population growth will put pressure on the labor market for older workers and on support systems for the elderly. The lecture will also look at large regional differences in these patterns. While population growth will slow dramatically in most regions, sub-Saharan Africa will continue to experience rapid population growth and increasing numbers of children and youth. Africa will also experience an increase in the proportion of its population in working ages, however, potentially an important positive factor in African economic growth.
PowerPoint
Flyer
Jane Menken Annual Distinguished Lecture Series. Sponsored by CUPC
Tuesday, Mar 3, 12:30 to 1:30 PM, IBS Room 155A
Family Size of Children and Women during the Demographic Transition
David Lam, Department of Economics and Population Studies Center, University of Michigan and Leticia Marteleto, University of Texas
Abstract: This paper analyzes links between declines in the family size of women and declines in the family size of children during the demographic transition. We extend Preston's well-known model (1976) in two ways. First, we derive the relationship between the variance of women's family size and children's family size, a relationship that has important implications for inequality in children's family size. Second, we analyze family size from the perspective of children of a given age rather than women of a given age. We apply the framework to 310 data sets from the IPUMS-International census project and the Demographic and Health Surveys, representing 101 countries. Consistent with Preston's conjecture, we find that mean family size of children tends to fall more slowly than mean family size of women as fertility declines. The increase in resources per child is 5%-20% smaller than it would be if children's family size decreased at the same rate as women's family size. We show that inequality in children's family size increases substantially as fertility declines, the result of increasing skewness in women's family size.
PowerPoint
Flyer
Sponsored by CUPC
Friday, March 6, 3:30 PM, GUGG 205
Institutional Diversity and Local Forest Governance
Krister Andersson, Director, Center for the Governance of Natural Resources, IBS and Associate Professor in Environmental Policy, Department of Political Science
CU Geography Department Research Presentation
Wednesday, March 11, 9:30-10:30 AM, IBS Room 155B
Panel Discussion: Making the Most of a Professional Conference
Professor Carew Boulding and graduate students Kathryn Nowotny and Beth Whalley
All IBS and social science department graduate students are invited to this panel on making the most of a professional conference. Panelists represent several disciplines (political science, criminology, and sociology) and different career stages. Topics will include networking, getting involved, job searches, conference logistics, and strategies for making the most of conferences at different career stages. Students from all stages in their program should find this panel useful. Refreshments will be served.
Thursday, March 12, 12:30-1:30 PM, IBS Room 155
Federal hiring and working or interning at the Census Bureau
Renee Ellis, US Census Bureau and the University of Maryland University College
The purpose of this talk is to cover the basics of the federal hiring process as well as some unique factors of the census hiring process. This includes a discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of federal employment as well as particular job opportunities such as paid internships, research opportunities, and mentorships. There is a bit of an emphasis on graduate students here but at Duke I adjusted it for undergraduates as well by talking a bit more about what work at the census entails. There is a fairly wide audience appeal.
All are invited to attend. Renee is also available to meet individually with students and/or faculty to discuss census data and research infrastructure. This visit is sponsored by the Colorado based Spatial Sciences Node of the NSF-Census Research Network. Please contact Seth Spielman (seth.spielman@colorado.edu) with questions or to set up an appointment with Renee.
Tuesday, March 17, 12:30-2:00 PM, IBS Room 155A
Panel Discussion: External Funding for Graduate Students
Myron Gutmann, IBS director; Judith McCabe, IBS grants coordinator; Alexa Van Dalsem, proposal analyst, Office of Contracts and Grants; Kathryn Nowotny, Ph.D. candidate and IBS affiliate
We are pleased to announce an IBS-sponsored panel on external funding for graduate students. This will be similar to last year's panel series, but condensed into one 90-minute session. Speakers will discuss the overall funding landscape for graduate students, the CU Office of Contracts and Grants, proposal and budget writing, and student experiences with the funding process. Refreshments will be served.
Thursday, Apr 9, 12:30 to 1:30 PM, IBS Room 155B
Examining the Unfulfilled Promise of Hospice and the Paradox of Underutilization
Dr. Karen Lutfey & Emily Hammad, Department of Health & Behavioral Sciences, University of Colorado Denver
Sponsored by CUPC
Thursday, Apr 9, 5:00 - 6:30 PM, Norlin Library British Studies Room
Spatial Narrative: The Challenge of Mapping Experience
Anne Knowles, Professor of Geography, Middlebury College
Co-sponsored by CUPC and the CU Department of History
Workshop: Migration, Climate and Health: Disasters and Displacement
April 9-10, 2015, IBS Room 155B
With support from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, the Institute of Behavioral Science and University of Colorado Population Center are hosting the 1st annual workshop on Climate, Migration and Health. This year's sub-theme is natural disasters and displacement.
The two-day workshop, held in Boulder, Colorado, will bring together 10 researchers and 2 policy communicators to showcase innovative research on natural disasters, displacement and health, as well as to identify gaps and develop collaborations. We aim to bring together researchers on migration-climate and climate-health to consider the under-studied 3-way connection betweeen migration-climate-health. Researchers from social and natural sciences are encouraged to apply. Funds are available for partial reimbursement for domestic travel and lodging. Applicants must be post-PhD and we aim for an interdisciplinary mix of junior and senior scholars.
Class Website
Workshop sponsored by CUPC.
Wednesday, April 15, 11:30AM - 12:30 PM, IBS Room 155A
Panel Discussion: How to Succeed in the Academic Job Market
Andy Baker, Associate Professor of Political Science; Gisella Kagy, soon-to-be Ph.D. in Economics; Elizabeth Lawrence, soon-to-be Ph.D. in Sociology; and John O'Loughlin, College Professor of Distinction, Geography
We are pleased to announce an IBS-sponsored panel for graduate students on succeeding in the academic job market. This event is targeted to social scientists who are interested in learning more about the academic job market, broadly construed (research universities, liberal arts colleges, postdocs, and everything in between). Refreshments will be served.
Thursday, Apr 16 ~ This session has been postponed to Fall 2015.
Thirty-Five Years Later: The Long-Term Effects of a Child Health and Family Planning Program in Bangladesh
Jane Menken, Randall Kuhn, Tania Barham, Elisabeth Root, IBS
Sponsored by CUPC
Wednesday, April 22, 10:00-5:30 PM, IBS Room 155A&B
Institute of Behavioral Science Research Symposium
Postdoc and Student Research Poster Session
Stop by to browse the posters anytime from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. An IBS-wide happy hour will be held from 4:00-5:30 p.m., and students/postdocs will be available to talk to people about their posters throughout the day.
Please RSVP to Steve Graham if you plan to attend the happy hour: robert.graham@colorado.edu.
Friday, Apr 24, 3:00 - 4:30 PM, Norlin Library British Studies Room
Intergenerational Mobility in Britain, Canada, and the United States, 1850-1911: New Evidence from Linked Census Data
Evan Roberts, Assistant Professor History, University of Minnesota
Sponsored by CUPC
Wednesday, May 6, 12:00 to 1:00 PM, IBS Room 155A
Mother's Milk, Maternal Strategies, and Seasonality: Lessons from West Africa
Robin Miriam Bernstein, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado Boulder
Flyer
Sponsored by Health & Society
Thursday, May 7, 12:00 to 1:00 PM, IBS Room 155A
The Body Project: Dissemination and the Implementation of a Dissonance Based Body-acceptance Program at CU Boulder and Beyond
Sona Dimidjian, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder
Flyer
Sponsored by CUPC
Workshop: Thursday, May 14, 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM, IBS Computing Lab, Room 150
Building a Website
Nancy Thorwardson, Computing and Research Services, IBS
A personal website is one of the key components in creating and maintaining an online professional identity. This workshop will be an active, webpage-building session in which each participant will create a website using the Google Sites web-building tool.
Registration is required.
Registration and Workshop Materials
Sponsored by Computing and Research Services

2012 - 2014:


2011 and earlier: