Taking a break from the books at the annual graduate students vs. faculty softball game.Taking a break from the books at the annual graduate students vs. faculty softball game.

Our graduate program has developed quite a bit since the 1920s when the department granted its first PhD degree to Erwin Meyer for his dissertation on English craft guilds.  Today our graduate students are trained in the central principles and research methods that characterize the discipline of History through classroom instruction, professional development training, and individualized advising. They also gain a thorough grounding in their particular area of study as well as an ability to situate that area of study in a larger transnational and global context.

As of the academic year 2012-13, all entering M.A. and Ph.D. students will follow the Department of History’s new graduate curriculum. All students will focus their studies in two equally-weighted fields:

• a regional/national field: either U.S. [all of U.S. history], Europe [medieval, early modern or modern, with a regional/national emphasis], or Asia [emphasis on country/region and/or period]).

• a global/thematic field: course in this field might include, but are not limited to, e.g., imperialism and colonialism, decolonization in transnational perspective, environmental history in transnational perspective, diplomacy and international relations, visual culture in the modern world, trade and diaspora in the early modern world, World War I in global perspective, history and memory in transnational perspective, and Atlantic world.

Students are expected to work with their faculty advisors to craft sub-fields of emphasis within both the regional/national and global/thematic fields.

If you are looking for syllabi from History Department courses, many are now available online:http://syllabus.colorado.edu/. Undergraduate courses are numbered from 1000-4999. Graduate courses are numbered 5000 and above.For further information, please consult the MA program page or the Ph.D. program page. If you still have questions after reviewing the webpages, please contact our Graduate Assistant, Scott Miller.

Thesis Availability: The University does not archive copies of MA or PhD theses.  They may be obtained from the ProQuest Thesis and Dissertation Database if the author has not embargoed distribution.