THE NATURE OF GEOGRAPHY

Richard Hartshorne

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CHAPTER

I. Introduction VII.  The Limitation of the Phenomena of Geography to Things Perceived by the Senses
II. The Nature of Geography According to its Historical Development VIII.  A Logical Basis for the Selection of Data in Geography
III. Deviations from the Course of Historical Development IX.  The Concept of the Region as a Concrete Unit Object
IV. The Justification for the Historical Concept of Geography as a Chorographic Science X.  Methods of Organizing the World into Regions
V. "Landscaft" and "Landscape" XI.  What Kind of Science is Geography?
VI. The Relation of History to Geography XII. Conclusion: The Nature of Geography
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FOOTNOTES| SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES | AUTHOR INDEX | SUBJECT INDEX  | NOTES ON THE HYPERTEXT EDITION

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Created on 2000.3.28.  Last updated 2000.5.4.  KEF.