August 2011 eNotes

You are here

Grad Students Apply Their Skills to Community Development

Fourteen students go abroad for practicums

BOLD Summer Bridge

Incoming students get a jumpstart on fall

BOLD Summer Bridge

More than 70 incoming BOLD Center students got a jumpstart on the fall semester by participating in the two-week Aspire and GoldShirt Summer Bridge programs in July. The unique Summer Bridge programs give students the chance to meet each other and get to know the campus in a collaborative, fun setting.

Chemical & Biological Engineers Fuel Economy With 10 Startups

Chemical and biological engineering students and faculty at the University of Colorado Boulder have launched several innovative technologies that are fueling Colorado’s economy by creating jobs and drawing significant venture-capital and other funding to the state.

Ten active companies have been created since 1997 based on technologies invented wholly or in part by chemical and biological engineering students and their faculty supervisors. These spin-off companies have raised nearly $410 million in follow-on funding, including grants, seed and venture-capital financings, U.S. Small Business Administration funding, and acquisitions, according to the CU Technology Transfer Office.

Among the greatest success stories is Copernican Energy, an ultra-clean bio-based fuels company cofounded in 2006 by CU Professor Al Weimer, PhD student Chris Perkins, and alumnus Mike Masterson. Copernican was acquired by Sundrop Fuels in 2008, and this summer received a $155 million investment from Chesapeake Ventures.

Grad Students Apply Their Skills to Community Development

Fourteen graduate students from the Engineering for Developing Communities program traveled abroad this summer to gain field experience in community development. 

The students partnered with nonprofit organizations, private companies and universities for four- to 12-week “practicum” experiences in Guatemala, Nicaragua, Peru, Bolivia, Uganda, Nepal and China.

The Mortenson Center in Engineering for Developing Communities in civil, environmental, and architectural engineering arranged the practicum experiences, which included monitoring and evaluation of drinking water and sanitation systems, low-carbon approaches to affordable housing, cook stove optimization and emission testing, and other community development projects.

“The experience in Nicaragua was a great opportunity for me,” said Chalie Nevárez, who trained local staff and supervised the roll-out of a smartphone monitoring and evaluation system developed by the Denver nonprofit El Porvenir to assess the sustainability of drinking water and sanitation projects in 44 rural communities. “I would love to go back and keep working in the field as a development engineering consultant.”

Nevárez earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental engineering at Marquette University, and is now pursuing a graduate certificate in engineering for developing communities through the Mortenson Center at CU-Boulder.

Fourteen graduate students from the Engineering for Developing Communities program traveled abroad this summer to gain field experience in community development. 

The students partnered with nonprofit organizations, private companies and universities for four- to 12-week “practicum” experiences in Guatemala, Nicaragua, Peru, Bolivia, Uganda, Nepal and China.

The Mortenson Center in Engineering for Developing Communities in civil, environmental, and architectural engineering arranged the practicum experiences, which included monitoring and evaluation of drinking water and sanitation systems, low-carbon approaches to affordable housing, cook stove optimization and emission testing, and other community development projects.

“The experience in Nicaragua was a great opportunity for me,” said Chalie Nevárez, who trained local staff and supervised the roll-out of a smartphone monitoring and evaluation system developed by the Denver nonprofit El Porvenir to assess the sustainability of drinking water and sanitation projects in 44 rural communities. “I would love to go back and keep working in the field as a development engineering consultant.”

Nevárez earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental engineering at Marquette University, and is now pursuing a graduate certificate in engineering for developing communities through the Mortenson Center at CU-Boulder.

Fourteen graduate students from the Engineering for Developing Communities program traveled abroad this summer to gain field experience in community development. 

The students partnered with nonprofit organizations, private companies and universities for four- to 12-week “practicum” experiences in Guatemala, Nicaragua, Peru, Bolivia, Uganda, Nepal and China.

The Mortenson Center in Engineering for Developing Communities in civil, environmental, and architectural engineering arranged the practicum experiences, which included monitoring and evaluation of drinking water and sanitation systems, low-carbon approaches to affordable housing, cook stove optimization and emission testing, and other community development projects.

“The experience in Nicaragua was a great opportunity for me,” said Chalie Nevárez, who trained local staff and supervised the roll-out of a smartphone monitoring and evaluation system developed by the Denver nonprofit El Porvenir to assess the sustainability of drinking water and sanitation projects in 44 rural communities. “I would love to go back and keep working in the field as a development engineering consultant.”

Nevárez earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental engineering at Marquette University, and is now pursuing a graduate certificate in engineering for developing communities through the Mortenson Center at CU-Boulder.

Honors & Awards: August 2011

Congratulations to the following individuals on their outstanding achievements:

Faculty

  • Richard Regueiro of civil, environmental, and architectural engineering will lead a new multi-university research initiative (MURI) on soil blast modeling and simulation, aimed at creating a more accurate representation of the impact of buried landmines and IEDs on military vehicles. The initiative is funded by the Department of Defense at $7.2 million over five years.
  • Ryan Gill of chemical and biological engineering was named an associate editor of Biotechnology and Bioengineering.

Students

  • Jessica Kaminsky, a graduate student in civil engineering working with Amy Javernick-Will, received the EPA Star Fellowship.
  • Dylan Boone, a graduate student in astrodynamics working with Dan Scheeres in aerospace engineering, was awarded an NESSF Fellowship from NASA to study the design and control of a Europa orbiter mission.
  • Julia Feldhacker, who will enter the graduate program in aerospace engineering sciences this fall, has been awarded a four-year DOD SMART fellowship to fund her PhD program. Her advisor is George Born.

New Faculty & Staff: August 2011

Welcome to the following new faculty and staff in the college:

  • Jianliang Xiao, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
  • Sai Reddy, Assistant Professor, Chemical & Biological Engineering
  • Ann Greco, Lab Coordinator, Chemical & Biological Engineering
  • Megan Jorgensen, Program Assistant, Sustainable by Design Residential Academic Program
  • Lynne Salinkas, Administrative Assistant, Aerospace Engineering Science

Important Announcements

CUEngineering is here!
The 2014 edition of CUEngineering magazine is hot off the press! Check it out online.

Graduating this spring?
Get all the critical details about the May 2014 Engineering Recognition Ceremony.

Don't forget summer session!
CEAS courses don't slow down over the summer - choose from 58 undergraduate and graduate engineering courses during Maymester and sessions A-D, May 12-Aug. 8.

University of Colorado Boulder
© Regents of the University of Colorado
PrivacyLegal & Trademarks
College of Engineering & Applied Science
Employment
Contact Us