OTPIC Officially Retired

As of December 2, 2005, the Online Training Program on Intractable Conflict (OTPIC) has been officially retired, and is no longer open to new registrations.

The successor to OTPIC is a course called Dealing Constructively with Intractable Conflicts (DCIC). The new curriculum is built around one of our major projects, Beyond Intractability, and offers a much more extensive and informative set of learning materials than that available through OTPIC.

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International Online Training Program On Intractable Conflict

Conflict Research Consortium, University of Colorado, USA

Identify Integrative Options

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Often parties in conflict do not even consider using integrative options for conflict resolution because they haven't heard of them, or don't think that they could possibly be successful.  Yet integrative options do exist.  They range from making persuasive appeals to people on the other side (usually focused on common values, goals, or needs), offering apologies and/or forgiveness for past deeds, seeking areas of commonality, reversing the dehumanization process, building trust  with opponents, and many others.  As is true with other forms of power, it is important to identify what integrative options you have, how they might be implemented, and what the likely costs and effects might be.  Generally, integrative options are less expensive to implement than force based options, and they are often more successful, as they do not generate the level of resistance and backlash that force often does.  On the other hand, they must be carefully crafted to be successful, and sometimes need a bit of force or exchange in addition in order to be taken seriously.

 

Links to More Information on Identifying Integrative Options

Kenneth E. Boulding--Three Faces of Power
The Three Faces of Power and Ecodynamics (below) are two of Boulding's books which best explain the power of integrative approaches to conflict. This book is summarized here.
Kenneth Boulding--Ecodynamics: A New Theory of Societal Evolution
The Three Faces of Power and Ecodynamics (above) are two of Boulding's books which best explain the power of integrative approaches to conflict. This book is summarized here.
Paul Wehr--Power Resources Inventory
In this essay Paul Wehr describes how one might create an inventory of one's power resources--considering threats (force) exchange, and integrative options simultaneously.

Links to Related Approaches

Integrative Approaches

Identify Sources of Power / Power Strategy Mix

 

Links to Related Problems

Failing to Identify Available Options for Dealing with the Situation

Assuming Force is the only Possible Response

 


Copyright 1998 Conflict Research Consortium  -- Contact: crc@colorado.edu