Film Studies

Production +

FILM 2000-3. Beginning Filmmaking. Instructs students in making Super-8 films. Covers use of cameras and editing equipment, basic editing and splicing techniques, and analysis of pertinent films. May emphasize making personal, experimental films or making narrative sound films, according to instructor. Students need to purchase materials and rent the necessary equipment. The Film Studies Program maintains an equipment pool with modest rental fees for students needing equipment. Prereq., FILM 1502 or instructor consent.

FILM 2010-3. Moving Image Computer Foundations. Provides students with artistic foundational hands-on experience in integrated use of media software in both the PC and MAC creative imaging making digital working environments. Includes fundamentals in general computer maintenance, creative and practical audio editing, image management and manipulation, and creative moving image practice. Prereq., film major or instructor consent.

FILM 2300-3. Beginning/Intermediate Filmmaking. Covers basic camera, editing, and splicing techniques for Super-8 film. Equipment is available at the film studies office for a modest rental fee. Prereq., FILM 1502 or instructor consent.

FILM 2500-3. Introduction to Cinematography. Film production class focusing on developing a basic understanding of the aesthetics and principles of Cinematography. Through projects, screenings, and critiques, students learn creative camera lighting processes. Prereqs., FILM 1502 and 2000 or 2300 with an averaged combined grade in these two courses of 3.00, with a minimum overall GPA of 2.0. Restricted to film majors.

FILM 2610-3. Animation Production. Includes analysis of independent and experimental animation and an introduction to various animation techniques (object, line, collage, sand or paint on glass, Xerox, cameraless, pixellation, etc.). Students produce exercise films and a final film exploring these techniques. Prereq., FILM 2000. Recommended prereq., FILM 2500 or 2600.

FILM 2900-3. Lighting. Covers the basics of “why you need lighting,” color temp, as well as camera techniques, lighting theory, and lighting set-ups for still and motion picture film video. Emphasizes hands on as well as theory. Prereq., FILM 2000 or 2300. Recommended prereq., FILM 1502.

FILM 3010 (1-3). Film Production Topics. Offers students both theoretical and practical experience in various specialized areas of cinematic production. Topics vary but include production in the documentary, fictional narrative, animation, computer animation, and experimental genres. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours. Prereq., FILM 2000 or 2300.

FILM 3030-3. Cinema Alternative Process. Explores alternative methods of film processing and filmic image manipulation. Through projects, film screenings, lectures and discussions students will learn fine arts approaches to creative control for the moving image. Prereq., FILM 1502, 2500, 2000 or 2300, or instructor consent. Restricted to BFA majors.

FILM 3400-3. Cinema Production I. Exploration of creative cinema production through short production and post-production projects. A short final project will be required. Focuses on the tactics and strategies of independent cinema production, examining a variety of approaches to genre. Explores a range of film and digital technologies. Prereqs., FILM 1502, 2500, and 2000 or 2300. Coreqs., FILM 3515 and 3525. Restricted to BFA film studies majors or instructor consent.

FILM 3600-3. Digital Post-Production Process. Through projects, discussions, and screenings, this class explores the practices and aesthetics of computer-based moving-image art editing. Restricted to FMST majors or instructor consent required.

FILM 3620-3. Experimental Digital Animation. Instructs students in the making of digital animation. Covers the use of the exposure sheet, frame series manipulation, digital motion techniques, and an analysis of pertinent films. Emphasis is on digital tools to create individual, personal, or experimental animated works. Includes experimental techniques of transfer between digital media and film. Prereq., FILM 2610 or instructor consent. Recommended prereqs., FILM 3030 and FILM 3400 or 3600.

FILM 3700-3. Digital Audio Design. Studies and applies Pro Tools as a post-production audio toolbox. Applied techniques include sound recording, sound editing, field recording, foley, vocal recording and editing, plug-in generated sound creation, MIDI, basic scoring principles, audio sweetening, and audio mixing. Students will be required to complete regular editing assignments in addition to a final soundscape project. Prereq., FILM 2000, 2500, and 3400 or 3600. Restricted to BFA majors.

FILM 3900 (1-3). Independent Study (Production). May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours.

FILM 3920-3. Professional Seminar. Learning aspects of professional development in the field of cinema. Through workshops and assignments students will learn of the many opportunities found within all areas of production. Guests will help inform the students of professional options and expectations. Topics will include: crew work, fund raising, marketing festivals, low budget filmmaking, and alternative venues. Students may have an internship concurrently with this course. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Prereq., FILM 2500 or 2500, or instructor consent. Recommended restriction to BFA film majors.

FILM 3940 (1-6). Film Studies Internship. Provides students with professional internship experiences with film, video, new media production companies, governmental agencies, production units, audio recording studios, and new media industries. Students will be responsible for securing their own internship position. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours. Prereqs., must be a BA or BFA film studies major with a CU GPA of at least 2.00, upper-division standing, and a 3.00 GPA as a BA or BFA film studies major. Offered pass/fail only.

FILM 4000-3. Advanced Digital Postproduction. Through projects, discussions, and screenings, this class explores the advanced practices and aesthetics of computer-based moving-image art editing. Topics include how to edit and manage a postproduction cycle, how to use digital editing systems and capabilities such as compositing, digital audio, and optical effects treatments. Prereqs., FILM 1502, 2000 or 2300, 2500, 3400 or 3600, or instructor consent. Restricted to BFA FMST majors. Cannot be taken simultaneously with FILM 3400 or 3600. Same as ARTF 5000.

FILM 4010 (1-3). Topics in Film Studies: Production. Prepares students for advanced Film Studies production courses. Subject matter varies each semester. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours, provided the topics are different. Same as ARTF 5010.

FILM 4030-3. Visiting Filmmakers Seminar. Examines creative issues in contemporary cinema art. Graduate and advanced undergraduate students explore filmmaking ideas with guest artists within a seminar setting. Filmmakers, videographers and programmers of national and international reputation, with an emphasis on “experimental” practice, interact with graduate and advanced undergraduate students, and discuss their work at seminar meetings, public lectures or events. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Recommended prereqs., FILM 1502 and 4453 or instructor consent. Restricted to FMST, BASA, and ARTC majors. Same as ARTF 5030.

FILM 4240-3. Beginning Video Production. Presents a studio course on basic single camera video production strategies and concepts. Through class screenings, projects, demonstrations, discussions, and readings, students gain an introductory familiarity with camera, lighting, sound, editing and the organization and planning involved in a video project. Explores a basic theoretical understanding of video as an art form and its relationship to television, film, art, history, culture. Prereqs., FILM 2000 and 2500 or instructor consent. Same as ARTS 4246.

FILM 4340-3. Intermediate Video Production. Continuation of beginning video production. Extends the knowledge of single camera video production strategies and concepts. Expands the concept of montage (editing) and strategies to develop a video project through class screenings, projects, discussions, and readings. Furthers theoretical understanding of video as an art form. Prereq., FILM 4240 or instructor consent. Same as ARTS 4346.

FILM 4440-3. Advanced Video Production. Continuation of intermediate video production. Explores advanced technical skills to control the quality of the video image in production, postproduction, and distribution. Emphasizes self-motivated independent projects, conceptual realization of advanced student work and basic working knowledge of distribution and life as a media artist. Promotes further theoretical understanding of video as an art form. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours. Prereq., FILM 4340 or instructor consent. Same as ARTS 4446.

FILM 4500-3. Cinema Production 2. Advanced exploration of creative cinema production through short production and post-production projects. Course focuses on the tactics and strategies of independent cinema production leading to the completion of a BFA thesis project exploring either documentary, experimental, or narrative genres. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Prereq., FILM 3400, 3515, and 3525. Restricted to BFA film studies major or instructor consent. Same as ARTF 5500.

FILM 4600-3. Creative Digital Cinematography. Explores creative approaches to single camera digital cinematography through short projects, discussions, and screenings. Relates creative photography and poetic approaches to the digital camera cinema. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Prereqs., FILM 2000, 2500, and 3400 or 3600, or ARTS 4246 or 5346 instructor consent. Restricted to FILM majors. Same as ARTF 5600.

History +

FILM 2521-3. Classics of the Foreign Film: 1960s to Present. Surveys the classics of international cinema from the 1960s to the present. Recommended prereq., FILM 1502. Restricted to FILM/FMST majors. Non-majors will need instructor’s consent.

FILM 3051-4. Film History 1. Intensive introduction to film history from 1895 to 1935. Topics covered include the beginnings of motion picture photography, the growth of narrative complexity from Lumiere to Griffith, American silent comedy, Soviet theories of montage, German expressionist films, and the transition to sound. Prereq., FILM 1502.

FILM 3061-4. Film History 2. Starts with the late 1930s and early 1940s films of Renoir and Welles and follows the historical growth and evolution of film aesthetics to the present. Studies Italian neorealist, French new wave, and recent experimental films, as well as the films of major auteur figures such as Bergman, Kurosawa, Fellini, Hitchcock, Bunuel, Antonioni, and Coppola. Prereqs., FILM 1502 and 3051, or instructor consent.

FILM 3081-3. American Film in the 1980s and ’90s. Examines the relationship between American films of the 1980s and ’90s and their cultural and historical context. Includes films by Lynch, Stone, Solondz, Scott, Scorsese, Lee, Duyne, Lemmons, Tarantino, Altman. Controlled enrollment. Prereqs., FILM 1502, 3051, 3061, and instructor consent.

FILM 3091-3. Post-War American Film/Culture/Politics. Examines the relationship between American films from the mid-1940s to the present day and their cultural and historical context. Includes films by Capra, Curtiz, Frankenheimer, Kazan, Kramer, Jewison, Wexler, Pakula, Cimino, Fincher, Lynch, Stone, and Lee. Priority is given to students who have taken both semesters of Film History (FILM 3051 and 3061). Prereqs., FILM 1502. Recommended prereq., FILM 3051.

FILM 3191-3. “The Golden Age”: Film Directors, Actors, and Writers from the Golden Age of Television. Traces the roots of live television and anthologies of the fifties. Examines several of the most interesting and radical Hollywood directors, writers, and actors of the sixties and seventies who emerged from this “golden age” of television: Frankenheimer, Penn, Altman, Lumet, Cassavetes, Serling, and Chayevsky. Prereq., FILM 1502.

FILM 3211-3. History of Russian Cinema. Surveys Russian cinema in historical and cultural context from early 20th century to the present. Prereq., FILM 1502 or RUSS 2221. Same as RUSS 3211. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

FILM 3301-3. Contemporary Issues in Russian Film. Examines the relationship between politics, economics, aesthetics, and the way moral and social issues are treated in noteworthy Russian films from the last 20 years. Same as RUSS 3301.

FILM 3501-3. Film Production Management. Familiarizes students with principles of film management techniques as well as problem-solving methodologies developed specifically for the film industry. Emphasizes the technique of production boarding as the central tool in production management as well as budget and contracts information. Offered through Continuing Education. FILM 3501 or 3563 may be used for partial fulfillment of major requirements. Prereq., FILM 2000, COMM 1240, and JOUR 3674.

FILM 3901 (1-3). Independent Study (Critical Study). May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours.

FILM 4001-3. Screening Race, Class, and Gender in the U.S. and the Global Borderland. Engaging with the ways in which racial, class, gender and sexual oppression intersect, this class examines several filmic productions by and about diasporic and subaltern subjects (especially children and women) in the U.S./Mexico borderlands, and the urban ethnic metropoles of the global borderlands. Prereq., ETHN 2001 or equivalent ETHN course. Same as ETHN 4001.

FILM 4021-3. Directing/Acting for the Camera. Offers an intensive workshop that provides students with experience directing dramatic material, acting before a camera, and interpreting or adopting dramatic material for film. No experience in directing or acting required. Attendance, research, and papers required. Recommended prereq., FILM 1502. Same as ARTF 5021.

Genre and Movements +

FILM 1502-3. Introduction to Film Studies. Introduces the critical study of film, exploring basic theoretical concerns while presenting a survey of important film genres, both narrative and nonnarrative. Lectures may be presented by various faculty members. Considerable amount of writing is required.

FILM 2312-3. Film Trilogies. Study of films designed as trilogies, drawing on a wide range of international cinema. Films include Satyajit Ray’s Apu Trilogy (India), Krzysztof Kieslowski’s Three Colors Trilogy (Poland), Francois Truffaut’s Antoine Doinel cycle (France), and Abbas Kiarostami’s Iran Trilogy (Iran). Restricted to FILM/FMST majors. Non-majors will need instructor’s consent.

FILM 2412-3. Melodrama and Culture. Explores the evolution of melodrama as a film genre from the 1910s to the Hollywood classical era and contemporary cinema, and the genre’s adaptability to different historical cultural contexts outside of American cinema. Analyzes the political and cultural functions of melodrama in contexts ranging from classical Hollywood to Latin American cinema, from European films of the 1960s to revisionist films of the 1990s. Prereq., FILM 1502. Recommended prereq., FILM 3051. Restricted to FILM/FMST majors. Non-majors will need instructor’s consent.

FILM 3002-3. Major Film Movements. Historical-aesthetic survey dealing with various national cinemas, taught in conjunction with the appropriate language department. Typical offerings are the French film, the German film, the Russian film, and so on. Also offers a more detailed approach to a more restricted subject, i.e., film comedy, women filmmakers, German expressionist cinema, Italian neorealism. May be repeated up to 12 total credit hours within the same term with departmental consent. Restricted to FILM/FMST majors. Non-majors will need instructor’s consent.

FILM 3012-3. Documentary Film. Provides a historical and theoretical introduction to the documentary film. Examines the historical beginnings of documentary film as well as exploring contemporary documentary practice. Canonical moments of documentary history and lesser known examples of documentary film work will be explored. Prereq., FILM 1502. Recommended prereq., FILM 3051.

FILM 3022-3. Jung, Film, and Literature. The basic themes of C. G. Jung’s archetypal psychology (shadow, anima/animus, character typology, and individuation) are studied and applied as tools of critical analysis to selected films and literary texts of the modern period. Prereq., instructor consent. Same as HUMN 3015.

FILM 3032-3. Stage Tragedy and Film. Presents an aerial survey of the history of Western drama as represented in film: Greek drama, the Elizabethans, Ibsen/Strindberg to O’Neill/Williams, Beckett, etc. Prereq., FILM 1502. Recommended prereq., FILM 3051.

FILM 3042-3. Horror Film. Serious investigation of the horror film genre as well as its origins in, and relation to, works of romanticist literature (e.g., Poe, Shelley). Issues include: the relation of fantasy and reality; gender in horror film; psychological issues raised by the films; historical issues generated by the genre. Prereq., FILM 1502. Recommended prereq., FILM 3051.

FILM 3402-3. European Film and Culture. Studies the relationships between European film, art, and culture. Offered each summer in a different European city (viz, Rome, Paris, London, Athens, Barcelona). There will be regular in-class lectures, film screenings, field trips, and on-site teaching. May be repeated up to 12 total credit hours. Recommended prereq., introductory film and art history courses. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: literature and the arts.

FILM 3422-3. Genre: The Hollywood Musical. Second only to jazz, some critics regard the Hollywood musical as the greatest American popular art form of the 20th century. This course proposes a historical, formal, and theoretical approach to the musical through its several iterations, from the classical, to the revisionist, to the unusual, placing the changes in the genre’s form, structure, and ideology in the context of America’s changing social, political, and religious values. Prereq., FILM 1502. Recommended prereq., FILM 3051.

Topics +

FILM 2003-3. Film Topics. Varying topics on important individuals, historical developments, groupings of films, film directors, critical and theoretical issues in film. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours, provided the topics are different.

FILM 2513-3. Major Asian Filmmakers. Surveys the major Asian directors from China, India, Japan, Taiwan, and Vietnam. Recommended prereq., FILM 1502. Restricted to FILM/FMST majors. Non-majors will need instructor’s consent.

FILM 2613-3. Exploring Good and Evil through Film. Eighteen films depict our capacities for good and evil. Topics addressed include the following: the Holocaust, Jung’s concept of “the Shadow,” the Seven Deadly Sins, altruistic and sociopathic personalities, capital punishment, the redemptive narrative, and the satanic in film. Same as FARR 2510. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: ideals and values.

FILM 3003-3. Major Film Directors. Focuses on the work of a single director or a group of related directors. Course content varies each semester. Consult the online Schedule Planner for specific topic. May be repeated up to 12 total credit hours with departmental consent. May be used for partial fulfillment of a college requirement only once. Restricted to FILM/FMST majors. Non-majors need instructor consent.

FILM 3013-3. Women and Film. Examines the representation of women both in mainstream movies and in women’s counter-cinema that resists traditional form, content, and spectator-text relationships of Hollywood models. Emphasizes work by key women filmmakers such as Margarethe Von Trotta, Lizzy Borden, and Yvonne Rainer, as well as readings in feminist film theory. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

FILM 3033-3. Color and Cinema. Examines color and cinema from historical, technological, aesthetic and theoretical perspectives. Students will be required to complete both creative and scholarly assignments.

FILM 3043-3. Topics in Critical Film Studies. Lect. and lab. Prepares students for advanced Film Critical Studies work. Subject matter varies from semester to semester. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours, provided topics are different. Prereq., FILM 1502 or instructor consent. Restricted to FILM or FMST majors.

FILM 3503-3. German Film Through World War II. History and theory of Weimar and Nazi film with sociocultural emphasis. Taught in English. Same as GRMN 3503.

FILM 3513-3. German Film and Society 1945–1989. Introduces issues in German society through film during the Cold War. Focus on East and West Germany, though some other German language films may be included. Emphasis is on reading films in their social, historical, and political contexts. Taught in English. Same as GRMN 3513.

FILM 3563-3. Producing the Film. Focuses on the production process of movie making from idea through distribution, analyzing each of the five phases involved, including the major players, function and problems inherent in each. Emphasizes the critical role the script plays in this process. Designed to give students a “map of the minefield” before venturing out on their own. Offered through Continuing Education.

FILM 3603-3. Sound and Vision. Historical and aesthetic overview of sound in relation to film, ranging from Hitchcock’s Blackmail to Mailick’s The Thin Red Line. Pursues issues in sound design, mixing film scores, voiceovers, and film/sound theory in narrative, experimental, and documentary films. Among the filmmakers to be studied are Vertov, Welles, Altman, Brakhage, Lipsett, Eisenstein, Coppola, Scorcese, Stone, Leone, Godard, Nelson. Also explores a limited practicum using Pro Tools for sound design. Prereq., FILM 1502. Recommended prereq., FILM 3051.

FILM 4003-3. Film and Fiction. Explores similarities and differences between literature and film as narrative arts. Studies several novels, short stories, and plays and films made from them. Examines problems in point of view, manipulation of time, tone, structure, and setting. Same as ARTF 5003.

FILM 4013-3. Film, Photography, and Modernism. Provides interdisciplinary study of film, photography, and modernism, focusing on issues such as dystopia, alienation, sexuality, subjectivity, and self-referentiality. Photographs by Stieglitz, Strand, Weston, Evans, Cartier-Bresson, Kertesz, and Moholy-Nagy. Films by Dziga-Vertov, Eisenstein, Resnais, Antonioni, Bergman, Bunuel, and Bertolucci. Prereq., FILM 1502. Recommended prereq., FILM 3051. Same as ARTF 5013.

FILM 4023-3. Topics in International Cinema. Focuses on major international filmmakers who have had a decisive impact on world cinema. Students will learn how directors create their own innovative body of work with specific formal and thematic patterns, and will also learn to place such work within multiple frameworks that will cover film history, theory, aesthetics, philosophy, and social and cultural analysis. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours provided topics are different. Prereq., FILM 1502. Recommended prereqs., FILM 3051 and 3061. Restricted to FILM, FMST, ARTC majors. Same as ARTF 5023.

FILM 4043 (1-3). Topics in Film Studies: Critical Studies. Prepares students for advanced Film Studies critical studies courses. Subject matter varies each semester. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours, provided the topics are different. Same as ARTF 5043.

FILM 4453-3. Elective Affinities: Avant-Garde Film and the Arts. Traces the history and aesthetics of avant-garde/ experimental films in light of similar ideas found in the other arts, particularly painting, poetry, photography and music. Topics covered include Dada and the early avant-garde; surrealism and psychodramas; Brakhage and abstract expressionism; feminist arts and film since the 1980s; the idea of the sublime in painting, music, and film; landscape in painting, photography, and film; post-modernism and the cinema; queer theory, gender/identity politics, and aesthetics of recent films; and specific multiple disciplinary artists such as Andy Warhol, Michael Snow, Helen Levitt, and Gunvor Nelson. Prereq., FILM 1502. Same as ARTF 5453.

Intensive and Small Courses +

FILM 3004-3. Films of Alfred Hitchcock. Intensive, critical investigation of the films of one of cinema’s greatest directors, Alfred Hitchcock. Concepts to be examined include authorship, desire, gender, and film acting. Critical and theoretical writings about Hitchcock are explored. Paper and exams required. Restricted to FILM/FMST majors. Non-majors will need instructor’s consent.

FILM 3104-3. Film Criticism and Theory. Surveys the range and function of film criticism, introduces major positions and concepts of film theory, and focuses on students’ abilities to write about film. Prereq., FILM 1502. Restricted to FILM, FMST, and HUMN majors. Same as HUMN 3104.

FILM 3504-3. Topics in German Film. Analyzes key issues in German culture as they are represented in film and other media, e.g., technology, architecture, women, and the Holocaust. Taught in English. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours provided the topics are different. Same as GRMN 3504.

FILM 3514-3. German Film and Society after 1989. Introduces post-1989 German culture through film. The course emphasizes films in their socio-historical contexts and explores developments in German culture during and after the unification. Taught in English. Same as GRMN 3514.

FILM 4004-3. Topics in Film Theory. Provides topic-centered analyses of controversial areas in film theory. Students read extensive materials in the topic area, analyze and summarize arguments as presented in the literature, write “position” papers, and make oral presentations in which they elaborate their own arguments about specific assigned topic, establishing critical dialogue with the primary materials. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Prereq., FILM 3051 or instructor consent. Restricted to senior FILM, FMST, or HUMN majors. Same as HUMN 4004 and ARTF 5004.

FILM 4024-3. Advanced Research Seminar. Focuses on a specific topic, director, or genre chosen by the professor. Research skills and critical thinking are emphasized. With faculty guidance, students determine individual projects and present them to the class. Class participation is mandatory. Each student submits a thorough and original research paper for a final grade. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Prereq., FILM 1502. Recommended prereqs., FILM 3051, 3061. Same as ARTF 5024.

FILM 4604-3. Colloquium in Film Aesthetics. Seminar for the serious round table discussion and critique of film as an art form, emphasizing development of appropriate verbal and written language skills for description of film. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Restricted to juniors/seniors. Same as ARTF 5604.

Workshops +

FILM 2005-3. Movies and Screenplay Analysis. Analyzes the narrative structure of films and screenplays. Familiarizes students with the specific narrative characteristics of the classic motion picture, the three-act structure, and the multiple tasks involved in the process of adaptation. Dissects the form and structure of feature films through analyzing movies and screenplays. Prereq., FILM 1502.

FILM 2105-3. Introduction to the Screenplay. Explores, through close reading and original student work, the form and structure of the screenplay from the writer’s perspective. Students will begin by analyzing structural and character elements of such screenplays as Chinatown and Witness, then analyze screenplays of their choosing. Students will learn the basics of screenwriting form, then develop and write 10 minutes of an original screenplay. Prereq., FILM 1502.

FILM 3005-3. Issues in Film Comedy. Film comedies constitute one of cinema’s most accomplished genres. This is a critical, historical, and theoretical investigation of silent, classical, and contemporary film comedy. Works by Chaplin, Keaton, Hawks, Cukor, Woody Allen, and others will be explored. Papers, exams required. Recommended prereq., FILM 1502.

FILM 3515-1. Camera Workshop. Three intensive workshops focusing on the development of independent cinema production and post-production skills. The instructor must certify students in order to continue with their BFA studies. Prereqs., FILM 1502, 2500, and 2000 or 2300. Coreq., FILM 3400. Restricted to BFA film studies majors.

FILM 3525-1. Cinema Editing Workshop. Three intensive workshops focusing on the development of independent cinema post-production skills. The instructor must certify students in order to continue with their BFA studies. Prereqs., FILM 1502, 2500, and 2000 or 2300. Coreq., FILM 3400. Restricted to BFA film studies majors.

FILM 4005-3. Screenwriting: Short Form. A writing intensive course that focuses on the art of the short form screenplay. Students will complete regular writing exercises, presentations, and several short scripts. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Prereq., FILM 3400 or 3600. BFAs only.

FILM 4075-3. Scriptwriting Workshop. Designed to give students practical criticism of their script writing and technical format requirements. Either stage plays or screenplays are studied, as announced. May be repeated up to 9 total credit hours. Prereq., instructor consent based on submission of manuscript. Same as ENGL 4071.

FILM 4105-3. Advanced Screenwriting. Introduces professional screenwriting, in the form of a creative writing workshop. Admission by portfolio (see film department). Students write scenes and scripts for short films, feature treatments, etc., and are graded on a final portfolio. Prereq., approved writing sample. Recommended prereqs., FILM 3051 and 3061. Same as ARTF 5105.

FILM 4505-3. Screenwriting: Long Form. Creative writing workshop in which students plan and write a feature-length screenplay with emphasis on format, dialogue, characterization, and story. Prereqs., FILM 1502 and 2000. Recommended prereq., FILM 2600.

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