Classics

Degrees .. BA, MA, PhD

Through consultation with the undergraduate advisor, the bachelor’s degree in classics is tailored to the student’s interests in the field. Major and minor programs can be arranged with a concentration in either Latin or Greek or a combination of the two, with a focus on classical literature, culture, and thought (including mythology, literature, philosophy, religion, art, archaeology, and history) or with a particular emphasis on classical history, art, and archaeology. Prospective majors and minors should consult with the undergraduate advisor and review the departmental list.

The undergraduate degree in classics emphasizes knowledge and awareness of:

• the fundamental outlines of the history of Greek and Roman literature, from Homer to the end of classical antiquity;
• the historical and cultural contexts of particular works; and
• the art, religion, and philosophy of ancient Greece and Rome and their roles in world cultural history.
In addition, students completing the degree in classics are expected to acquire the ability and skills to:

• read, understand, and interpret written documents and works of literature in ancient Greek or Latin where relevant, as well as in translation;
• communicate in spoken and written form with adequate clarity and complexity for the relevant audience; and
• read and think critically.
Interested students are encouraged to consult www.colorado.edu/classics/undergrad for more information.

Bachelor’s Degree Program +

Students must complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and the required courses listed below, including at least 18 credit hours of upper-division courses.

Required Courses Semester Hours

Track I: Greek, Latin, or Greek and Latin

Greek and/or Latin 30

Note: Students must designate one language as the primary field of study. The first year of this language does not count toward the major. If you study both languages, the introductory sequence in the second language does count toward the major.
Electives (classical literature, culture and thought or ancient history, art and archaeology courses listed under Tracks II and III) 6

Track II: Literature, Culture, and Thought

Classical literature, culture, and thought (CLAS 1010, 1030, 1100, 1110, 1115, 1120, 1140, 2020, 2100, 2110, 2610, 3820, 4040, 4110, 4120, 4130, 4840; HEBR 1030; PHIL 3000) 18
Ancient history, art, and archaeology (CLAS 1051, 1061, 1509, 2009, 2019, 2041, 3039, 3049, 4021, 4031, 4041, 4061, 4071, 4081, 4091, 4109, 4119, 4129, 4139, 4149, 4169, 4199, 4209, 4219, 4761, 4849; HIST 3011) 12
Greek and/or Latin 6

Note: Students must designate either Greek or Latin as the primary field of language study. The first year of this language does not count toward the major. With the approval of the undergraduate advisor, upper-level Greek or Latin courses may be substituted for classical literature, culture, and thought or ancient history, art, and archaeology courses.

Track III: History, Art, and Archaeology

Survey course in ancient history or art and archaeology (CLAS 1051, 1061, or 1509 3
Ancient history, art, and archaeology (CLAS 1051, 1061, 1509, 2009, 2019, 2041, 3039, 3049, 4021, 4031, 4041, 4061, 4071, 4081, 4091, 4109, 4119, 4129, 4139, 4149, 4169, 4199, 4209, 4219, 4761, 4849; HIST 3011) 15
Classical literature, culture, and thought (CLAS 1010, 1030, 1100, 1110, 1115, 1120, 1140, 2020, 2100, 2110, 2610, 3820, 4040, 4110, 4120, 4130, 4840; HEBR 1030; PHIL 3000) 12
Greek and/or Latin 6
Note: Students must designate either Greek or Latin as the primary field of language study. The first year of this language does not count toward the major. With the approval of the undergraduate advisor, upper-level Greek or Latin courses may be substituted for classical literature, culture, and thought or ancient history, art, or archaeology courses.

Graduating in Four Years +

Consult the Four-Year Guarantee Requirements for information on eligibility. The concept of “adequate progress” as it is used here only refers to maintaining eligibility for the four-year guarantee; it is not a requirement for the major. To maintain adequate progress in classics, students should meet the following requirements:

Declare the classics major by the beginning of the second semester.
Students must consult with a major advisor to determine adequate progress toward completion of the major.

Minor Program +

A minor is offered in classics. Declaration of a minor is open to any student enrolled at CU-Boulder, regardless of college or school. For more information see www.colorado.edu/artssciences/students/undergraduate/academics/minors.html or www.colorado.edu/classics/undergrad.

Graduate Degree Programs +

Master’s Degree +

Candidates may choose to emphasize Greek, Latin, classical art and archaeology, classical antiquity, or the teaching of Latin (MAT).

It is expected that students opting for the teaching of Latin either have achieved accreditation at the secondary level or are planning to do so through the School of Education. The MA degree alone does not satisfy the state requirements for certification.

Degree Requirements. Candidates for the MA degree in Latin or Greek are required to complete at least six graduate level courses in Greek and/or Latin and to pass a written examination in translation of the major language. Students intending to pursue the PhD in classics are strongly advised to develop proficiency in both Latin and Greek, and to acquire a reading knowledge of German, French, or Italian.

Candidates for the MA degree in Classical Art and Archaeology are required to complete at least two graduate-level courses in Greek and/or Latin and five graduate-level courses in ancient and/or medieval art and archaeology (of which at least one must be at the 5000-level or above [not 4000/5000] and one must be a preapproved nonclassical course). In addition, they must pass written examinations on Greek and Roman art and archaeology. Students intending to pursue the PhD in classical archaeology are strongly recommended to develop proficiency in both Latin and Greek and to acquire a reading knowledge of German, French, or Italian. With the approval of the associate chair for Graduate Studies, graduate-level classes in Greek or Latin may be substituted for classical archaeology or history.

Candidates for the MA degree with emphasis on classical antiquity are required to complete at least two graduate-level courses in Greek and/or Latin and must pass a written examination in two of the following fields: history, art and archaeology, religion and mythology, philosophy and political theory, and Greek or Latin translation.

Candidates for the MA Plan I (24–27 hours of course work at the 5000-level or above, plus 3–6 credit hours of thesis) take an oral comprehensive examination in defense of the thesis. Candidates for the MA Plan II (30 credit hours at the 5000-level or above, without thesis) must have departmental approval and pass an oral comprehensive examination covering their course work and reading lists for their exams.

Candidates for the MA degree with emphasis on the teaching of Latin must pass a written examination in Latin translation and an oral comprehensive examination on teaching methods and their own Latin teaching project. Thirty hours of course work, including one Latin workshop and a special project, are required. Plan I is not offered for the MA degree with emphasis on teaching.

Doctoral Degree +

Candidates for the PhD in classics must meet the following requirements:

1. A minimum of 42 hours of course work at the 5000 level or above (excluding thesis and accelerated courses). Course work completed in the MA program at the University of Colorado, or up to 21 hours of graduate credit transferred from another institution, may be applied toward this requirement. Courses should be distributed as follows:
a. Four 7000-level graduate seminars (at least one each in Greek and Latin).
b. Two courses in ancient history and/or classical archaeology.
c. One course in either Greek or Latin prose composition.
d. Two courses in special fields such as epigraphy, law, linguistics, literary theory, medieval studies, palaeography, papyrology, philosophy, or religion, as approved by the associate chair for graduate studies.
2. A minimum of 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit with no more than 10 of these hours in any one semester. No more than 10 dissertation hours may be taken preceding the semester of taking the Oral Comprehensive Examination. Up to 10 hours may be taken during the semester in which the student passes the comprehensive examination.
3. A reading knowledge of German and one other modern foreign language (normally Italian or French). Proficiency is tested by a one-hour written translation test using a dictionary. Students may take a Foreign Language Exam at any time by arrangement with the associate chair for graduate studies. Students are encouraged to pass both modern language exams before the end of the third semester and required to do so before the end of the fourth semester in the PhD program.
4. Greek and Latin Translation Exams. Two examinations of three hours of written translation in Greek and Latin. Each examination will consist of two out of three prose passages and two out of three verse passages for a total of approximately 120 lines. There will be two administrations of each exam per year, in the fall and spring. Students are encouraged to pass both exams by the end of the second semester and required to pass them by the end of the second year in the PhD program.
5. Special Author Exams. Two oral examinations of 1.5 hours each on two ancient authors, one Greek and one Latin.
6. Oral Comprehensive Examination. Two hours on Greek and Latin Literature. Students are encouraged to complete this exam early in the fifth semester and must have completed it by the end of the sixth semester in the PhD program.
7. Dissertation Prospectus. To be circulated to the Dissertation Advisory Committee for approval. Students are encouraged to complete the prospectus during the fifth semester and must complete it during the seventh semester in the PhD program.
8. Dissertation. To be completed by the end of the tenth semester in the PhD program.
9. Final Examination (upon submission of dissertation). Two hours of oral defense of the dissertation.
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