Courses

Engages non-physics majors in hands-on, minds-on activities and labs to investigate the physical world, the nature of science, and how science knowledge is constructed. This introductory course is especially relevant for future elementary and middle school teachers although it will meet the needs of most non-physics and non-science majors. Physics content focuses on interactions and energy.

Invites science and mathematics students to explore teaching as a career by providing first-hand experiences teaching science/math lessons in local elementary classrooms. Introduces theory and practice necessary to design and deliver excellent instruction. Master teachers provide ongoing support and feedback. Meets weekly on CU campus (1.5 hours/week) and involves five visits to a local elementary school. Prerequisites: Restricted to AMEN, ASTR, BCHM, CHEM, EBIO, GEOL, IPHY, MATH, MCDB, PHYS, GEEN, NRSC, Arts and Sciences Open Option majors, College of Engineering majors, or Education minors only.
Invites science and mathematics students to explore teaching and learning in informal K-12 environments. Introduces theory and practice necessary to design and deliver excellent instruction. Meets weekly on CU campus (1.5 hours/week) and requires participants to work a minimum of five hours with K-12 students at STEM-related special events such as science fairs, after school programs, and science camps. Prerequisites: Restricted to AMEN, ASTR, BCHM, CHEM, EBIO, GEOL, IPHY, MATH, MCDB, PHYS, GEEN, NRSC, Arts and Sciences Open Option majors, College of Engineering majors, or Education minors only.
Builds on EDUC 2020 and further develops lesson design and inquiry-based teaching practice. Offers opportunity to explore teaching career and learn about middle school culture. Master teacher provides support as students design and deliver lessons in middle school classrooms. Emphasizes assessment of student learning. Meets weekly on CU campus (1.5 hours/week) and involves five visits to a local middle school. Department enforced prereq., EDUC 2020. Prerequisites: Restricted to AMEN, ASTR, BCHM, CHEM, EBIO, GEOL, IPHY, MATH, MCDB, PHYS, GEEN, NRSC, Arts and Sciences Open Option majors, College of Engineering majors, or Education minors only.

Invites students in humanities and social sciences to explore teaching as a career by providing first-hand experiences teaching in local elementary and middle schools. Introduces theory and practice necessary to design and deliver excellent instruction. Students receive ongoing support and feedback from a classroom teacher. Meets weekly on CU campus (1.25 hours/week). Involves additional visits to local schools.

Provides overview to evolution of American public schools by exploring major reform efforts from the common school movement to present. Considers contentious values, important players, and roots of school structures. Examines both what intellectuals were thinking about public education and how ordinary people experienced schools. Assesses how differences in race, class, ethnicity, gender, and power shape public schools. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: United States context.

Provides opportunities to view and analyze how facets of education are represented (or misrepresented) in film. Considers narratives constructed about education and how those stories fuel popular conceptions of and assumptions about students, teachers, and schools. Examines how issues of race, class, and gender are embedded in how films represent schools, teachers, students, and communities.

Enhances students' self-awareness in a variety of educational and cultural settings. Investigates self within a cultural context, inviting students to engage more deeply with their cultural assumptions and lenses, as well as the cultural practices and beliefs of other distinct groups. Explores themes relating to diversity through works of fiction, cultural contexts, contemplative practices, poetry, music and experiential activities.

Exposes students to strategies used to teach English as a second or foreign language. Covers both theoretical and applied aspects of language learning and teaching. Exposes students to techniques, activities, strategies and resources to plan instruction for students learning English as a second language. Emphasizes oral language development, literacy and content-area instruction for teaching K-12 students.

Designed to meet needs of students with topics of interest. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours.

Offers supervised campus and off-campus experiences tied to course work in the Chancellor's Leadership RAP or the INVST program. See also EDUC 2920. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Same as LDSP 2910.

Examines curriculum theory, K-12 reform, and the concepts of citizenship, democracy, power, and diversity through classroom discussion and participation in a school-based Public Achievement program. Students will dialogue with diverse groups of people; identify multiple perspectives around controversial issues; and learn to use research and writing to articulate public problems and advocate for their solutions. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Same as INVS 2919. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: human diversity.

Offers supervised campus and off-campus experiences tied to course work in the Chancellor's Leadership RAP or the INVST program. See also EDUC 2910. May be repeated up to 6 total credit hours. Same as LDSP 2920.

Introduces students - both future teachers and those simply interested in education - to pressing issues surrounding education within the United States. The course reveals the complex relationship between schools and the larger society of which they are a part. Examines issues of diversity and equity from different disciplinary lenses, including history, philosophy, sociology and anthropology. Approved for arts and sciences core curriculum: contemporary societies or human diversity. Prerequisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.

Examines ways digital media are changing the way young people learn, play, make friends, and participate in civic life. Studies widely implemented digital tools intended to support literary, math, and science learning of children ages 4-18. Involves brief internship (5 hours outside class) and design projects that integrate these tools to transform in either a classroom or after-school program.

Introduces elementary education students to art education. Introduces many visual art techniques, art media, and processes used in art education. The class includes hands-on studio art experiences in a format that supports subjects such as literature, writing, music, and social studies. Emphasizes the role of art education and materials in supporting the artistic development and visual literacy of children. Department enforced prereq., completion of 30 hours of course work. Prerequisites: Restricted to School of Education (EDUC) undergraduates only

Comparatively studies education in other countries, emphasizing its role in developing nations, with an emphasis on successful models in basic literacy, primary education, secondary curriculum, and teacher education. Analyzes political, social, and economic policies and ideologies for their relevance to the development process, including the role of international organizations: World Bank, UNICEF, UNESCO, Peace corps and Volunteer Agencies. Same as EDUC 5015.

Focuses on teaching culturally and linguistically diverse secondary school students, special education students, and differentiation in the secondary classroom. Includes hands-on experiences in secondary school settings. Credit not granted for this course and EDUC 4351. Prerequisites: Restricted to EDEN, EDFR, EDGR, EDIT, EDJP, EDLT, EDMA, EDMU, EDSC, EDRU, EDSP, EDSS or MMED majors only.
Explores current theories of learning in mathematics and science at the secondary level. This course focuses on learners' opportunities to learn mathematics and science in a classroom context from the perspective of different theoretical orientations. Students examine their own assumptions about learning, and critically examine the needs of a diverse student population in the classroom. Prerequisites: Restricted to AMEN, ASTR, BCHM, CHEM, EBIO, GEOL, IPHY, MATH, MCDB, PHYS, GEEN, NRSC, Arts and Sciences Open Option majors, College of Engineering majors, or Education minors only.
Students design and implement instructional activities informed by what it means to know and learn mathematics and science, and then evaluate the outcomes of those activities on the basis of classroom artifacts. Students examine how content and pedagogy combine to make effective teaching. Same as EDUC 5060. Prerequisites: Restricted to School of Education (EDUC), Mathematics-Secondary Education (EDMA) or Science-Secondary Education (EDSC) majors only.
Analyzes fundamental psychological concepts underlying classroom instruction, as well as adolescent growth and development. Includes service learning requirement. Same as PSYC 4114. Prerequisites: Restricted to students with 27-180 credits (Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors) only.
Presents and discusses issues in secondary school curriculum, instruction, and classroom management as they play out in world language classroom. Examines, analyzes, and evaluates a variety of teaching strategies, their effectiveness for students, and teacher dispositions to facilitate learning. Includes in-school experiences. Prerequisites: Restricted to EDEN, EDFR, EDGR, EDIT, EDJP, EDLT, EDMA, EDMU, EDSC, EDRU, EDSP, EDSS or MMED majors only.

Examines the questions of "who I am", "where I come from", "what I might become" and "what I am called to do" in order to remember as well as make sense of our lives. Introduces and discusses narrative theory and selected memoirs. Students engage in reflection on their own narrative, and evaluate their practical and analytic understanding of narrative practice. EDUC 4135 and 5135 are the same course.

Addresses reading and evaluation of books, children's, interests, authors and illustrators, folk literature, multicultural literature, modern fanciful tales, and trends.

Focuses on the nature of linguistic development and performance. Examines works that reflect a range of scholarly approaches to language study, explores language use both in and out of school, takes up the relationships between language practices and power, and considers implications for classroom teaching. Same as EDUC 5222.

Pages