Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures

Undergraduate students may choose to major in either German studies or Russian studies; minors are offered in both. The department also offers courses in Hebrew studies and courses and a minor in Nordic studies.   

The major in German studies is an interdisciplinary program focusing on study of the German language, its manifestations in history, and its usage in the current cultural and social context; the literary, artistic, and philosophical aspects of German culture in the past and the present; the major historical events and developments in Germany and its neighboring countries, and the current political institutions and dynamics in Germany within the broader European framework.   

The undergraduate degree in German studies emphasizes knowledge and awareness of:

  • the fundamental outlines of German history and culture;
  • the history of modern German literature, 1750 to the present;
  • cultural developments in modern German-speaking Central Europe, such as the arts, cinema, and architecture; and
  • central issues such as the Nazi era and the Holocaust; the roles of women; German attitudes toward non-Germans; German culture after reunification and their reflection in German literature, arts, and media.   

In addition, students completing the degree in German studies are expected to acquire the ability and skills to:

  • read German at a level at which critical literary and cultural analyses can be performed;
  • write and speak German sufficiently to participate in critical discussions and write critical essays; and
  • speak and comprehend German sufficiently for all situations in daily life, especially the business and professional sectors of German life.  

The major in Russian studies is an interdisciplinary program focusing on study of the current cultural and social context, and the literary, artistic, and historical aspects of Russian culture in the past and present. The aim of the language curriculum is to equip students to read, write, speak, and understand Russian on a level allowing communication with natives and other users of the language. Before registering for a course, students should consult with a departmental advisor concerning appropriate placement.   

Students interested in Russian studies should consider a double major in order to increase their career opportunities. Prospective teachers might combine Russian studies with a major in another foreign language, while those preparing for a career in government, business, or social services should benefit from a combination of Russian studies and a social science or business major. Students structure their curriculum according to the departmental checklist for majors, in close consultation with a departmental advisor.   

The undergraduate degree in Russian studies emphasizes knowledge and awareness of:

  • the fundamental outlines of the history of Russian literature and culture from the Middle Ages to the present day;
  • the major Russian creative writers of the 19th and 20th centuries;
  • the historical context of Russian literature and culture; and
  • basic critical methodologies as they relate to the study of Russian literature. 

In addition, students with a degree in Russian studies are expected to acquire the ability and skills to:

  • comprehend contemporary Russian, written or spoken, to a degree permitting sophisticated analysis of cultural texts;
  • analyze Russian literary texts and give a reasoned response to them in literate English; and
  • write and converse in Russian at their own intellectual level.

Course codes for these programs are GRMN, GSLL, HEBR, NORW, RUSS, SCAN, and SWED. 

Bachelor's Degree Program(s)

Undergraduate Study in Germanic and Slavic
Languages and Literatures

Bachelor of Arts in German Studies

Students must complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and the required courses listed below.

The major requirement in German studies is 34 hours beyond GRMN 2010 (with grades of C- or above). Students design their own major in consultation with the undergraduate advisor and a faculty mentor. Completion of the following courses is required; at least 18 hours from the department must be upper division. Students who test out of GRMN 2020 are required to complete 33 hours.

Required Courses and Semester Credit Hours

German Language Courses (13 semester hours minimum above thre GRMN 2010 level)

Completion of the following German language courses or demonstration of third year proficiency:

  • GRMN 2020 Intermediate German 2—4 or
    GRMN 2030 Intensive Intermediate German—5
  • GRMN 3010 Advanced German 1—3
  • GRMN 3020 Advanced German 2—3
  • GRMN 4010 Advanced Grammar and Stylistics—3
    GRMN 4010 is required of all majors. With the exception of GRMN 4010, German languages courses may be taken either at CU-Boulder or on the CU study abroad programs in Regensburg or Berlin, Germany.

German Culture, Literature, and Other Electives (21 semester hours)

GRMN 4550 Senior Seminar (required and must be taken at CU Boulder) and any six German literature/culture courses from I or II. At least two of the six courses must be upper-division, and at least two must be in German. With the approval of the German program faculty advisor, one course from another department may be taken in lieu of one of the six courses, provided that the course has a direct link to German studies.

Courses Taught in German

  • GRMN 3030 Business German—3
  • GRMN 3110 German Literature from the Avante-garde to the Postmodern—3
  • GRMN 3120 German Literature from the Enlightenment to Expressionism—3
  • GRMN 3130 Issues in German Philosophy and Literature—3
  • GRMN 3140 Current Issues in German Literature—3
  • GRMN 3150 Issues in German Politics and Literature—3
  • GRMN 3520 Open Topics in the Cultural Context—3
  • GRMN 3900 Independent Study—1-6
  • GRMN 3930 Internship—1-6
  • GRMN 4330 The Age of Goethe—3
  • GRMN 4340 Seminar in German Literature—3
  • GRMN 4450 Methods of Teaching German—3

Students have the option of taking the exam Zertifikat Deutsch als Fremdsprache in GRMN 3020 and the Goethe-Zertifikat C1 in GRMN 4010.

Courses Taught in English

  • GRMN 1601 Germany Today (core: contemporary societies)—3
  • GRMN 1602 Metropolis and Modernity (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • GRMN 1701 Nature and Environment in German Literature and Thought (core: ideals and values)—3
  • GRMN 2301 Inside Nazi Germany (core: historical context)—3
  • GRMN 2501 20th Century German Short Story (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • GRMN 2502 Representing the Holocaust (core: ideals and values)—3
  • GRMN 2503 Fairy Tales of Germany (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • GRMN 2601 Kafka and the Kafkaesque (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • GRMN 2603 Moral Dilemmas in Philosophy and Literature (core: ideals and values)—3
  • GRMN 3501 German-Jewish Writers: From the Enlightenment to the Present (core: human diversity)—3
  • GRMN 3502 Literature in the Age of Goethe (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • GRMN 3503 German Film Through WWII—3
  • GRMN 3504 Topics in German Film—3
  • GRMN 3505 The Enlightenment (core: ideals and values) —3
  • GRMN 3513 German Film and Society 1945-1989—3
  • GRMN 3514 German Film and Society After 1989—3
  • GRMN 3601 German Women Writers (core: human diversity)—3
  • GRMN 3702 Dada and Surrealist Literature (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • GRMN 4251 Marxism—3
  • GRMN 4253 Philosophy of Language—3
  • GRMN 4301 Gender, Race and Immigration in Germany and Europe (core: human diversity)—3
  • GRMN 4501 Seminar: Literature in Cultural Context—3
  • GRMN 4502 Nietzsche: Literature and Values (core: ideals and values)—3
  • GRMN 4503 Issues in German Thought—3
  • GRMN 4504 Goethe’s Faust (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • GSLL 1108 Introduction to Jewish History (core: historical context)—3
  • GSLL 3401 The Heart of Europe: Filmmakers and Writers in 21st Century Central Europe—3
  • JWST 4544 History of Yiddish Culture—3

Required for Students in the Secondary Teacher Certification Program

  • GRMN 4450 Methods of Teaching German
  • GRMN 4460 High School German Teaching
  • Plus other requirements as stated by the School of Education.

NOTE: GRMN 4450 and 4460 can be taken only after full admission to the teacher education program in the School of Education.

Study Abroad

The department strongly recommends that all majors take part in study abroad. The university offers study abroad programs in Regensburg (academic year or spring semester) and Berlin (academic year or summer semester). Please consult with the major advisor. For more information on study abroad programs, see studyabroad.colorado.edu

Minor Program in German Studies

A minor is offered in German Studies. Declaration of a minor is open to any student enrolled at CU-Boulder, regardless of college or school. The requirements for a minor in German Studies are 19 hours (with grades of C- or above).

German Language (10 hours minimum above the 2010 level)*

  • GRMN 2020 Intermediate German 2—4 or GRMN 2030 Intensive Intermediate German—5
  • GRMN 3010 Advanced German 1—3
  • GRMN 3020 Advanced German 2**—3

Notes

* With the exception of GRMN 4010, German language courses may be taken either at CU-Boulder or on the CU study abroad programs in Regensburg or Berlin, Germany.  Students who are exempt from taking any of the above courses (and are not receiving transfer credit for them) can make up the credits by taking GRMN 4010, or any GRMN courses taught in German or English.  Substitutions need to be approved by the faculty advisor.  (Students are strongly encouraged to take GRMN 4010 as a substitution.)

** Students have the option of taking the exam Zertifikat Deutsch als Fremdsprache in GRMN 3020 and the Goethe-Zertifikat C1 in GRMN 4010.

 

German Culture and Literature (9 hours)

Three courses taught in German at the 3000- or 4000-level. One upper-division German course taught in English may replace one of these courses.

  • GRMN 3030 Business German—3
  • GRMN 3110 German Literature from the Avant-garde to the Postmodern—3
  • GRMN 3120 German Literature from the Enlightenment to Expressionism—3
  • GRMN 3130 Issues in German Philosophy and Literature—3
  • GRMN 3140 Current Issues in German Literature—3
  • GRMN 3150 Issues in German Politics and Literature—3
  • GRMN 3520 Open Topics in the Cultural Context—3
  • GRMN 4330 The Age of Goethe—3
  • GRMN 4340 Seminar in German Literature—3
  • GRMN 4550 Senior Seminar—3

Hebrew Studies

Hebrew language instruction is offered over six semesters at the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels. By the end of this cycle students have a sound basis in Hebrew language production, spoken and written, and comprehension, oral and written. The Jewish literature and culture courses introduce students to Jewish literature, culture, and religion, and examine Jewish identity in the modern and contemporary worlds. 

Nordic Studies (Scandinavian)

Courses are offered in English on Nordic culture and civilization. Courses are also offered in Norwegian and/or Swedish language. The language courses satisfy arts and sciences language requirements for the BA and BFA degrees. In addition, there is an exchange program with Uppsala University in Sweden and with the University of Copenhagen in Denmark (DIS). 

Minor Program in Nordic Studies

A minor is offered in Nordic Studies. Declaration of a minor is open to any student enrolled at CU-Boulder, regardless of college or school. A minor in Nordic Studies requires the completion of 18 credit hours. A minimum of 9 credit hours must be taken in upper-division courses. All courses used to fulfill requirements for the minor must receive a grade of C- or better; none may be taken pass/fail. A minimum of 9 hours must be taken on the Boulder campus, but students may earn credit for approved study abroad in the Nordic countries.

Required Courses and Semester Credit Hours

Language, Culture, and Society (9 hours) 

  • SWED 2120 Second-year Swedish Reading and Conversation 2*—4
  • NORW 2120 Second-year Norwegian Reading and Conversation 2*—4
  • NORW/SWED/SCAN 2900 Independent Study—3
  • NORW/SWED/SCAN 3900 Independent Study—3
  • SCAN 2201 Introduction to Modern Nordic Culture and Society (core: contemporary societies)—3
  • SCAN 2202 The Vikings (core: historical context)—3
  • SCAN 3201 Contemporary Nordic Society and Culture (core: contemporary societies)—3 
  • SCAN 3206 Nordic Colonialisms (core: human diversity)**—3
  • SCAN 3208 Women in Nordic Society (core: human diversity)**—3
  • SCAN 3301 Radical Nationalism in Northern Europe (core: ideals and values)—3         

Literature (9 hours)

  • SCAN 1202 Tolkien’s Nordic Sources (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • SCAN 3202 Old Norse Mythology (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • SCAN 3203 19th and 20th Century Nordic Literature (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • SCAN 3204 Medieval Icelandic Sagas  (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • SCAN 3205 Scandinavian Folk Narrative (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • SCAN 3206 Nordic Colonialisms (core: human diversity)**—3
  • SCAN 3208 Women in Nordic Society (core: human diversity)**—3
  • SCAN 3209 Contemporary Nordic Literature and Film**—3
  • SCAN 3506 Scandinavian Drama (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • SCAN 2900 Independent Study—3
  • SCAN 3900 Independent Study—3

Notes

* SWED/NORW 2120 and SWED/NORW 2900/3900 are not currently being offered by GSLL. SWED 1110, 1120, and 2010 are currently being offered by GSLL.

** SCAN 3206 Nordic Colonialisms, SCAN 3208 Women in Nordic Society, and SCAN 3209 Contemporary Nordic Literature and Film, may be counted either toward Language, Culture, and Society or toward Literature, but not both.

Bachelor of Arts in Russian Studies

Students must complete the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and the required courses listed below.

  • Completion of 38 hours from tracks A or B or 36 hours from Track C with grades of C- or better. (None may be taken as pass/fail.) At least 18 RUSS hours must be completed at the 3000- or 4000-level. NOTE: RUSS 1010 and 1020 do not count toward the 38/36 hours required for the bachelor’s degree in Russian. RUSS 1010 and 1020 will not count toward the maximum of 45 hours in the major department. Students are required to structure their curriculum  in close consultation with a departmental advisor. Transfer credit must be approved by the department.
  • Students with advanced Russian language skills are strongly encouraged to meet with a departmental faculty advisor to discuss language placement. Students who have Russian language transfer credit and/or students who are Russian language native or heritage speakers may enter the program at the upper-division level, up to RUSS 4010, with faculty permission. Students with previous knowledge of Russian must take the placement exam no later than the end of the first week of classes. Students who place out of Russian language courses required for the major must replace the credits with additional course work in Russian studies. Any substitutions to major course work must be pre-approved by the Russian faculty advisor.
  • Study abroad is recommended after the second year of language study.

NOTE: Beginning or middle-level language course requirements may be met by transfer credit or by testing out of the course. Students who enter the program at the third-year level must complete at least 18 credit hours in residence in courses numbered 3000 or above with grades of C- or better. (None may be taken pass/fail.) Students who enter at and enroll in Russian language courses at the 3000- or 4000-level may not receive credit for lower-division Russian language courses, unless lower-division language course work was completed prior to registration for 3000- and 4000-level Russian language courses. Students may not receive credit for both 3060 and 4010 or 4020 and 4060.

Required Courses and Semester Credit Hours

Track A: Russian Language and Culture (total 38 credit hours)

  • RUSS 2010 Second-Year Russian 1 (core: foreign language)—4
  • RUSS 2020 Second-Year Russian 2—4
  • RUSS 3010 Third-Year Russian 1—3
  • RUSS 3020 Third-Year Russian 2—3
  • RUSS 4811 19th Century Russian Literature (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • RUSS 4821 20th Century Russian Literature and Art (core: literature and the arts)—3

Two of the following (6 credit hours):

  • RUSS 2241 The Vampire in Literature and the Visual Arts—3
  • RUSS 3060 Advanced Russian for Heritage Speakers 1**—3
  • RUSS 4010 Advanced Conversation and Composition 1**—3
  • RUSS 4020 Advanced Conversation and Composition 2**—3
  • RUSS 4060 Advanced Russian for Heritage Speakers 2**—3
  • RUSS 4210 Open Topics: Russian Language and Culture—3
  • RUSS 4230 Russian Cultural Idioms—3
    OR any other upper-division Russian language class or 6 credits of upper-division study abroad Russian language class.

Two of the following (6 credit hours):

  • RUSS 2211 Introduction to Russian Culture (core: historical context)—3
  • RUSS 2221 Introduction to Modern Russian Culture (core: historical context)—3
  • RUSS 3601 Russian Culture Past and Present (core: historical context)—3

Two 2000-4000 level Russian or GSLL courses or JWST 4544 (6 total credit hours)

Notes

* core course

** Students may not receive credit for both 3060 and 4010 or 4020 and 4060.

 

Track B: Russian Culture and Literature (total 38 credit hours)

  • RUSS 2010 Second-Year Russian 1 (core: foreign language)—4
  • RUSS 2020 Second-Year Russian 2—4
  • RUSS 4811 19th Century Russian Literature (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • RUSS 4821 20th Century Russian Literature and Art (core: literature and the arts)—3

Two of the following (6 credit hours):

  • RUSS 2211 Introduction to Russian Culture (core: historical context)—3
  • RUSS 2221 Introduction to Modern Russian Culture (core: historical context)—3
  • RUSS 3601 Russian Culture Past and Present (core: historical context)—3

One of the following (3 credit hours):

  • RUSS 2231 Fairy Tales of Russia (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • RUSS 2241 The Vampire in Literature and the Visual Arts—3
  • RUSS 2471 Women in Russian Culture from Folklore to the 19th Century (core: historical context)—3
  • RUSS 2501 Russia Today (core: contemporary societies)—3

Three of the following (9 credit hours):

  • RUSS 3211 History of Russian Cinema (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • RUSS 3701 Slavic Folk Culture: Ideals and Values in the Contemporary World (core: ideals and values)—3
  • RUSS 4221 Cultural Mythologies of Russian Communism (core: ideals and values)—3
  • RUSS 4301 American-Russian Cultural Relations (core: historical context or U.S. context)—3
  • RUSS 4401 The Russian Jewish Experience (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • RUSS 4431 Dostoevsky—3
  • RUSS 4441 Tolstoy—3
  • RUSS 4451 Chekhov—3
  • RUSS 4471 Women in 20th Century Russian Culture (core: human diversity)—3
  • RUSS 4831 Contemporary Russian Literature (core: literature and the arts or contemporary societies)—3
  • RUSS 4841 The History of Modern Russian Drama—3
  • RUSS 4861 Absurd and Supernatural in Russian Literature—3

Two other 3000-4000 level Russian or GSLL culture/literature or language courses or JWST 4544 or upper-division study abroad language classes (6 credit hours)

Track C: Russian Major for Heritage Speakers (total 36 credit hours)

Students who are native speakers of Russian (speak or spoke Russian at home while growing up) and/or who attended school in Russia for one or more years when their family lived there, may be eligible for  special major track for heritage speakers. Heritage speakers of Russian who wish to major in Russian should speak with the advisor  for the Russian major to map out a specific plan for their major. 

  • RUSS 3060 Advanced Russian for Heritage Speakers 1—3
  • RUSS 4060 Advanced Russian for Heritage Speakers 2—3
  • Or any other upper-division Russian language course (recommended: RUSS 4010, 4020, 4210 or 4230)
    Note: students may not receive credit for both 3060 and 4010 or 4020 and 4060.
  • RUSS 4811 19th Century Russian Literature (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • RUSS 4821 20th Century Russian Literature and Art (core: literature and the arts)—3

Two of the following (6 credit hours):

  • RUSS 2211 Introduction to Russian Culture (core: historical context)—3
  • RUSS 2221 Introduction to Modern Russian Culture (core: historical context)—3
  • RUSS 3601 Russian Culture Past and Present (core: historical context)—3

One of the following (3 credit hours):

  • RUSS 2231 Fairy Tales of Russia (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • RUSS 2241 The Vampire in Literature and the Visual Arts—3
  • RUSS 2471 Women in Russian Culture from Folklore to the 19th Century (core: historical context)—3
  • RUSS 2501 Russia Today (core: contemporary societies)—3

Three of the following (9 credit hours):

  • RUSS 3211 History of Russian Cinema (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • RUSS 3701 Slavic Folk Culture: Ideals and Values in the Contemporary World (core: ideals and values)—3
  • RUSS 4221 Cultural Mythologies of Russian Communism (core: ideals and values)—3
  • RUSS 4301 American-Russian Cultural Relations (core: historical context or U.S. context)—3
  • RUSS 4401 The Russian Jewish Experience (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • RUSS 4471 Women in 20th Century Russian Culture (core: human diversity)—3
  • RUSS 4831 Contemporary Russian Literature (core: literature and the arts or contemporary societies)—3

One of the following (3 credit hours):

  • RUSS 4431 Dostoevsky—3
  • RUSS 4441 Tolstoy— 3
  • RUSS 4451 Chekhov—3
  • RUSS 4841 The History of Modern Russian Drama—3
  • RUSS 4861 Absurd and Supernatural in Russian Literature—3

One other 3000-4000 level Russian or GSLL culture/literature or language course, or JWST 4544—3

Study Abroad

The department strongly recommends that all Russian majors take part in the university summer language program in St. Petersburg. For more information on CU Study Abroad programs, see studyabroad.colorado.edu.

Minor Program in Russian Studies

Declaration of a minor in Russian studies is open to any student enrolled at CU-Boulder, regardless of college or school. A minor in Russian requires the completion of 20 credit hours. All courses used to fulfill requirements for the minor must receive a grade of C- or better. (None may be taken pass/fail.) Students may not apply more than 9 hours of transfer credit (including 6 upper-division credits) toward the minor. Transfer courses must be approved by the department.

  • RUSS 2010 Second-Year Russian 1 (core: foreign language)—4
  • RUSS 2020 Second-Year Russian 21—4
  • RUSS 3010 Third-Year Russian 1 or any 3000-4000 level Russian literature, film, or culture course—3

One additional 2000-4000 level RUSS course—3

One of the following (3 credit hours):

  • RUSS 2211 Introduction to Russian Culture (core: historical context)—3
  • RUSS 2221 Introduction to Modern Russian Culture (core: historical context)— 3
  • RUSS 3601 Russian Culture Past and Present (core: historical context)—3

One of the following (3 credit hours):

  • RUSS 4811 19th Century Russian Literature (core: literature and the arts)—3
  • RUSS 4821 20th Century Russian Literature (core: literature and the arts)—3

Note

1. Heritage speakers should take RUSS 3060 Advanced Russian for Heritage Speakers (3 credit hours) and RUSS 4060 Advanced Russian for Heritage Speakers II (3 credit hours) as well as any other 4000-level Russian language course in lieu of RUSS 2010 and RUSS 2020. In this case, 18 credit hours will be sufficient for the minor if other requirements are fulfilled.

Graduating in Four Years

Consult the Four-Year Guarantee Requirements for information on eligibility. The concept of “adequate progress” as it is used here only refers to maintaining eligibility for the four-year guarantee; it is not a requirement for the major. To maintain adequate progress in Germanic or Russian studies, students should meet the following requirements:

  • Begin to study the language in the freshman year, or have received AP credit.
  • In consultation with the major program advisor before the end of the drop/add period in the first semester, plan a tentative schedule of courses to be taken over eight semesters. 
  • Discuss progress toward the degree each semester with the major advisor.

Note: Although these requirements apply only in cases in which students are seeking to graduate under the terms of the four-year guarantee, they are good advice for all majors. Consult the program advisor about the major at any time.

Courses Taught in English

A number of courses are offered in translation. These courses generally require no previous study in the language, history, or culture of the area involved, and are open to all interested students, regardless of major.

Concurrent Bachelor's/Master's Program

Concurrent BA/MA Program in German Studies

Highly motivated undergraduates majoring in German studies at CU-Boulder have the opportunity to enter a BA/MA program, thereby earning both the BA and the MA in five years. The concurrent degree program offers a unique academic credential designed to produce skilled graduates for a variety of occupations. In most cases, students must make written application no later than April 1 of the sophomore year. A minimum GPA of 3.25 for all courses is required, as well as two letters of recommendation indicating strong potential for advanced, intensive work in German. The recommended track requires a total of 58 hours of courses, with graduate courses in the fourth and fifth years only. Students should have completed most of their MAPS/core requirements (at least 30–37 hours) by the end of the sophomore year. Only CU-Boulder students may apply. For specific requirements please contact the department or see gsll.colorado.edu.

Graduate Degree Program(s)

Graduate Study in Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures

Master’s Degree in German

Students wishing to pursue the interdisciplinary master’s in German should read carefully Requirements for Advanced Degrees in the Graduate School section. The following prerequisites and requirements apply: BA or equivalent in German or BA-level proficiency in German with a BA in a related field; general knowledge of the German-speaking countries’ literature, history, and culture; 24 hours of approved course work and a master’s thesis (6 hours), or 30 hours of course work without thesis; and reading knowledge of one modern foreign language in addition to German and English. For specific requirements please contact the department or see gsll.colorado.edu.

Master’s Degree in German/Master’s of Business Administration

To support the university’s mission of advancing knowledge across disciplines, the Leeds School of Business and the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures offer a dual degree, Master of Business Administration and Master of Arts in German Studies. In most cases, students should be able to complete the dual degree in three years with a total of 70 credit hours. Prospective students must apply to and meet the application and admission requirements for each program separately. See the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures for application to the German MA program, and the Leeds School of Business to apply to the MBA program.

PhD in German Studies

The new interdisciplinary PhD in German studies is designed so that students can complete their course work and their dissertation in four years for applicants who may want to pursue careers in academics, government, business, and the non-profit sector. In Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and many other European countries, it is a strongly held conviction that a doctorate demonstrates to potential employers intellectual independence, superior research and writing skills, the perseverance and ingenuity to complete an original piece of scholarship, and deep familiarity with a different culture. These qualities are equally valuable in the 21st-century American economy, and indeed in the global marketplace.

This program provides intensive and personalized mentoring, directed reading advice, and clinics devoted to dissertation- and conference-paper writing, digital and archival research, oral presentation, and interview preparation. Our PhD strongly emphasizes interdisciplinary work within a secondary concentration area of the student's choice, and includes one year spent abroad at CU-Boulder's partner universities of Göttingen and Regensburg or at other leading institutions in the German-speaking world. A wide range of graduate-level course offerings is designed to ensure content coverage and to move research projects into publishable scholarship. The expanded graduate faculty includes scholars in disciplines such as political science, comparative literature, Jewish studies, business, and library science. 

For more information, contact the department for information at gsll@Colorado.edu or see their website at gsll.colorado.edu.

Certificate Program

Certificate in International Engineering in German

The  purpose of this certificate is to provide engineering students training in language and culture, giving them skills necessary to work effectively with engineers in multinational teams and to succeed during overseas assignments in today’s global marketplace. It is an indication to prospective employers that the students have a certain degree of proficiency in German language and an understanding of the culture. Visit ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/academics/international-german.htm for more information.

Graduate Certificate in Critical Theory

This certificate offers students a background in philosophical foundations of critical theory. Drawing on disciplines such as philosophy, psychoanalysis, Marxism, literary criticism, and sociology, critical theory develops analytical tools for describing and evaluating modern society and cultural production. Students who are currently enrolled in a graduate disciplinary degree or a professional degree program are encouraged to apply for the Graduate Certificate in Critical Theory early in their graduate career. For further information, please visit our website at gsll.colorado.edu.