Buff Bulletin Board

This site is a listing of notices, training/seminars, jobs, campus services and events. Buff Bulletin is a service of Campus Communications.

Global Seminar: Discover the past, archaeology in Greece

Earn six credits in summer 2015 in Greece's Western Argolid on an exciting CU-Boulder Global Seminar. Obtain hands-on experience in the principles and practice of archaeology by working on an archaeological project. You will discover and explore new sites in the territory of Argos in southwestern Greece. Learn more at an informational meeting with the director, Dr. Sarah James: Wednesday, Oct. 1, 5-6 p.m., HUMN 1B90.

Fun research projects for kids

The Cognitive Development Center in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience is looking for children from birth to 14 years old who are interested in playing games that will help teach us about memory and language development. A visit, scheduled at your convenience, lasts about 30 minutes. Babysitting is available for siblings. Parents are compensated for travel and kids receive a fun prize.

For more information or to sign up, see our information below or call Gabriella at 303-492-6389.

September 24, 2014 • Gabriella Dimotsantos • cogdevctr@grey.colorado.edu
http://psych.colorado.edu/~cdc

Participate in social science experiments

We are currently recruiting for a series of social science experiments to be held starting next week (Sept. 30 - Oct. 2). Come take part in cutting-edge research and get paid for your time. If you're interested, register online at CUExperiments.com.

September 24, 2014 • Joby Schaffer • schaffej@colorado.edu
http://CUExperiments.com

Free family therapy: Colorado Family Project

The Colorado Family Project, a group of clinicians and researchers at CU, is conducting a study of family-based therapy for youth with mood swings and a family history of bipolar disorder. Treatment focuses on helping youth and their families understand and cope with mood swings, develop plans for preventing moods from getting worse, communicate more effectively and solve family problems. Treatment is free of charge, and families are compensated for participation in regular research interviews.

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