Orangutans

New broad-spectrum antiviral protein can inhibit HIV, other pathogens in some primates

Jan. 18, 2017

University of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered that a protein-coding gene called Schlafen11 (SLFN11) may induce a broad-spectrum cellular response against infection by viruses including HIV-1. The new research, which was recently published in the journal PLOS Pathogens , found that SLFN11's antiviral potency is highest in non-human primate species... Read more »
Jens Schmidt

BioFrontiers postdoctoral fellow first Coloradan to receive prestigious award

Jan. 12, 2017

If an anti-aging regimen that involves telomeres – part of the human chromosome – sounds too good to be true, it probably is, says Jens Schmidt, a postdoctoral fellow in the Cech Lab at CU Boulder’s BioFrontiers Institute . “There are all these products out there that say ‘hypercharge your... Read more »
Bob Garcea

$1.1 million grant funds CU Boulder research into next-generation vaccines

Nov. 4, 2016

The University of Colorado Boulder has received a $1.1 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop next-generation vaccines that require no refrigeration and defend against infectious diseases with just one shot. If successful, those advancements could radically transform the difficult task of dispensing life-saving immunizations in... Read more »
Loren Hough

Scientist develops a new way to look at a cellular shapeshifter

Oct. 21, 2016

Tubulin, a protein found in your cells, quietly lends itself to many life processes. It sorts itself into long chains, forming tubes that provide scaffolding for living cells. A versatile shapeshifter, tubulin can arrange itself into different structures during different types of cell behavior. Tubulin gained prominence for medical applications... Read more »
More than 2,700 attendees from around the world participated in the 2015 iGEM competition.

CU Competes in International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition

Oct. 13, 2016

The International Genetically Engineered Machine competition, or iGEM, is an annual synthetic biology competition that pits teams from schools from all over the world against each other with the goal of winning one of many possible awards. CU Boulder has been a participant for the last couple years, 2015 being... Read more »
Jacqueline Wentz is a graduate student in the IQ Biology PhD Certificate Program at BioFrontiers.

IQ Biology Blog: SIAM Life Sciences Conference in Boston

Oct. 13, 2016

By Jacqueline Wentz This July I attended the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) Conference on the Life Sciences in Boston. It was four days long, packed with talks, poster sessions, and unnecessary amounts of coffee. At the conference, I presented a poster on my latest research examining a... Read more »
BioFrontiers' Sara Sawyer discovered that a gene in S. cerevisiae and multiple other Saccharomyces yeast species appears to rapidly evolve to recognize and destroy attacking viruses.

Yeast gene rapidly evolves to attack viruses

Oct. 6, 2016

Humans have used Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast in baking, brewing and winemaking for millennia. New research from the University of Idaho and the University of Colorado Boulder reveals another way that yeast species can help our species: by demonstrating how viruses interact with their hosts, and how hosts may evolve to... Read more »
Assistant Professor in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Joel Kralj, a BioFrontiers Institute faculty member, became interested in measuring cellular voltage as a postdoctoral researcher.

Kralj NIH Innovation Award

Oct. 4, 2016

Innovator Award winner brings to light the electrical changes in cells Electric voltage powers life: Our brains use electrical transients to process every thought and every heartbeat arises from voltage changes in heart cells. Traditional measurements of voltage inside cells involve scientists making tiny wires and impaling cells, exactly the... Read more »
Biochemistry postdoc Tess Eidem shares her experience and resources after attending the Advocating for Science Symposium at MIT. Photo credit: Glenn Asakawa, University of Colorado

Advocating for Science Symposium: Exploring the Changing Landscape of the Scientific Enterprise

Sept. 29, 2016

By Tess Eidem, Ph.D. Last week I had the privilege to attend the Advocating for Science Symposium at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where I heard Mr. Corb’s and other science advocates’ message on how to use our diverse skills to move science forward. The mission of the two-day symposium... Read more »
April Goebl is a graduate student in the IQ Biology PhD certificate program at the BioFrontiers Institute.

IQ Biology Blog: My experience with Evolution

Aug. 30, 2016

by April Goebl Attending Evolution, the premier international conference for evolutionary biology, had a big influence on my recently spawned, yet still vague, choice to pursue a career in evolutionary biology. Held in Austin, Texas this year and the largest conference in its field, Evolution is a joint event for... Read more »

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