Students Features Archive

Join CU at the MAVEN launch this fall

Join us this fall for a once-in-a lifetime opportunity to be a part of CU-Boulder’s mission to Mars! The university will be hosting three fun-filled days of festivities Nov. 16-18 in Cocoa Beach, Fla., culminating in MAVEN’s launch. Space is limited for the launch viewing, and NASA requires we submit a list of tentative guests months in advance. All attendees MUST be registered with us by June 30 to be on NASA’s guest list.

The West is getting dustier, says CU-Boulder study

The amount of dust being blown across the landscape has increased over the last 17 years in large swaths of the West, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

The escalation in dust emissions — which may be due to the interplay of several factors, including increased windstorm frequency, drought cycles and changing land-use patterns — has implications both for the areas where the dust is first picked up by the winds and for the places where the dust is put back down.

CU-Boulder prof to lead NASA campaign to study North American air quality

A University of Colorado Boulder professor is leading a major NASA airborne science campaign this summer that will probe weather patterns and air pollution over a vast expanse of North America that have potential global climate consequences.

2013 Colorado Shakespeare Festival opens this weekend

A Midsummer Night's Dream kicks off the 2013 Colorado Shakespeare Festival season, with a preview performance on Friday, June 7 and opening night on Saturday, June 8. Dream a little dream of love and laughter as Shakespeare's most beloved comedy casts its spell on the enchanting Mary Rippon stage.

Diet likely changed game for some hominids 3.5 million years ago, says CU-Boulder study

A new look at the diets of ancient African hominids shows a “game changer” occurred about 3.5 million years ago when some members added grasses or sedges to their menus, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

Water-rock reaction could create enough 'food' to sustain life on Mars or in Earth's ocean crust

A chemical reaction between iron-containing minerals and water may produce enough hydrogen “food” to sustain microbial communities living in pores and cracks within the enormous volume of rock below the ocean floor and parts of the continents, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

Your student government: CUSG hiring executive staff

The newly elected CUSG executives are now hiring executive staff members for the 2013-14 school year.

"This is an amazing opportunity to get involved with CU Student Government and gain a unique set of leadership skills and policy experience," said Chris Schaefbauer, president of student affairs. "These positions work directly with the executives on making campus a better place for the student body."

CU-Boulder helps tap crowds to digitize museum records of bugs and plants

Inside the natural history museums of the world are billions of animal and plant specimens from birds, fish and beetles to flowers, mushrooms and grasses, all stacked, stored and preserved in jars and collection drawers.

The rich and diverse collections could be critical to understanding how the Earth’s biodiversity is changing in the face of a growing human footprint — if only the information were easily accessible.

Student life: Learning to be leaders

Like many CU-Boulder students, Andrea Tice yearns to make a difference in the world. As an undergraduate in the Leadership Residential Academic Program (RAP) Tice is learning specific skills that will help turn her dream into reality.

Northern hemisphere losing last dry snow region, says CU study

Last July, something unprecedented in the 34-year satellite record happened: 98 percent of the Greenland Ice Sheet’s surface melted, compared to roughly 50 percent during an average summer. Snow that usually stays frozen and dry turned wet with melt water. Research led by the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences now shows last summer’s extreme melt could soon be the new normal.

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