2012-13 Department News

  • Lindsay Ofrias co-authored an article that has just been published on the City of Boulder's Energy Future website. It's a policy document that looks at ways that Boulder could further encourage distributed solar generation within city limits.
  • The Institute of Behavioral Science has announced the opening on May 8th of a research exhibit featuring the work of J. Terrence McCabe, "Maintaining Pastoral Identity in a Changing World: The Turkana and Maasai People of East Africa". The exhibit includes objects and long-term field research photography from northwest Kenya and northern Tanzania.
  • Craig Lee (PhD'07) and colleagues at INSTAAR recently made a short film on the collaborative archaeological work they are conducting in Glacier National Park entitled, Alpine Archeology in the Land of the Blackfeet, Kootenai, Pend d'Orielle and Salish. See it online here: http://youtu.be/ifmdf2RHsK8.
  • Terry McCabe participated in the NSF’s 2012 All Scientists Meeting of the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network in Estes Park last September… “to make the case for integrating more anthropologists into the study of ecosystems.” The NSF created the LTER Network in 1980 to support long-term research of ecosystems with the understanding that many ecosystem processes can only be studied through long-term research. Sites were selected to represent major ecosystem types or natural biomes across the US (there are now also a few international LTER sites). It is one of the most highly funded NSF programs. More information in Anthropology News on the Web at: http://www.anthropologynews.org/index.php/2013/03/01/anthropologists-at-the-all-scientists-meeting-of-the-long-term-ecological-research-network/.
  • Anthropology lecturer Heather Williams (PhD 2011) will be working for the Boulder County Health Improvement Collaborative coordinating a small project designed to provide information about patients' experiences within the local health care services system.
  • Jamie Forde, PhD student, has been awarded a junior fellowship for the next academic year at Dumbarton Oaks Research Library, administered by the Trustees for Harvard University, in Washington D.C. The fellowship provides lodging, an office at the facility, and a living stipend, and will support him while writing his doctoral dissertation.
  • Cathy Cameron will have an article published in the June issue of American Anthropologist entitled "How People Moved Among Ancient Societies: Broadening the View".
  • The latest book authored by Gerardo Gutierrez is entitled, El Poder Compartido; ensayos sobre la arqueología de organizaciones políticas segmentarias y oligárquicas, ISBN 978-607-486-199-0. (Shared Power - Essays about the Archaeology of Segmentary and Oligarchy Political Organizations)
  • Editor, Art Joyce, has just released Polity and Ecology in Formative Period Costal Oaxaca through University Press of Colorado . Chapters were authored by department alumni Stacy Barber, Marc Levine, Michelle Butler, Arion Mayes and current PhD candidate Guy Hepp.
  • Steve Lekson is featured in a video produced by the CU Museum.
  • A lead story in the January 23 edition of the New Yorker online refers readers to Carole McGranahan's co-edited special issue of the journal Cultural Anthropology on the topic of the self-immolations in Tibet. Go to http://www.culanth.org/?q=node/526 to see the referenced article.
  • Guy Hepp, PhD candidate, and Stacy Barber (PhD '05) recently published their findings at Oaxaca: "Ancient Aerophones of Coastal Oaxaca, Mexico: The Archaeological and Social Context of Music". In Sound from the Past: The Interpretation of Musical Artifacts in an Archaeological Context, edited by R. Eichmann, F.Jianjun, and L-C. Koch, pp. 259-270.
  • Matt Sponheimer, Julia A. Lee-Thorp, Kaye E. Reed and Peter Ungar will be publishing a book entitled, "Early Hominin Paleoecology" with University Press of Colorado due out May 2013. It provides a good working knowledge of the subject while also presenting a solid grounding in the sundry ways this knowledge has been constructed. The book is divided into 3 sections - climate and environment (with a particular focus on the latter), adaptation and behavior, and modern analogs and models - and features contributors from various fields of study, including archaeology, primatology, paleoclimatology, sedimentology, and geochemistry.
  • PhD candidate, Ivy Hepp, recently received the Ruth Landes Memorial Research Fund grant from The Reed Foundation in New York in support of her dissertation research project entitled "Where the Clouds Descend: Fiestas and the Politics of Belonging in San Juan Mixtepec, Oaxaca, Mexico.
  • Gerardo Gutierrez went to Guerrero, Mexico over Winter Break to explain migrations depicted in a painting from Chiepetlán, a municipality of Tlapa, Guerrero, Mexico.
  • Michaela Howells (PhD candidate) and co-authors Richard Bender (PhD student), et al. were awarded the 2012 Biological Anthropology Section student prize for outstanding presentation at the recent American Anthropological Association meeting for their presentation "You Just Have to Wait: The Impact of Marital Status on the Pregnancy Outcomes of Samoan Women". This "high quality scholarship" research project was also co-authored by Darna Dufour.
  • A front page article, "Pharmaceutical Bioprospecting and the Law: The Case of Unckaloabo in a Former Apartheid Homeland of South Africa" can be found in Anthropology News 53(10):6-7 and was authored by graduate student Chris Morris.
  • Donna Goldstein has published, "Experimentalité: Pharmaceutical insights into anthropology's epistemologically fractured self." In: Susan Levine, ed. Medicine and the Politics of Knowledge. Cape Town, South Africa: HSRC.
  • PhD Candidate Marnie Thomson has published her first article, "Black Boxes of Bureaucracy: Transparency and Opacity in the Resettlement Process of Congolese Refugees." PoLAR: Vol. 35, No. 2. Page 186.
  • Inga Calvin will be the resident "Maya specialist" on the Not the End of the World Cruise, December 16-23. Inga will be giving lectures in glyphs and a tour of Coba on December 21.
  • An NSF grant to explore the political economy and the Sacbé at Cerén this coming summer was awarded to Payson Sheets. The excavation crew will include Zan Halmbacher, Rachel Egan, and Chris Dixon.
  • Among the highlights of the annual American Anthropological Association Conference was a presentation, "From Sacred Baths to Stretch Limos: Tamil Puberty Celebrations in Sri Lanka and Canada" by Dennis McGilvray and R. Cheran (University of Windsor, Ontario). Recent Anthropology lecturer (Currently with CU's Residential Academic Program) Sara Jamieson organized the panel: Coming of Age in the 21st Century: Female Puberty Rites Revisited.
  • PhD student, William Lempert, has published "Telling Their Own Stories: Indigenous Film as Critical Identity Discourse", in The Applied Anthropologist 32(1):23-32.
  • A compelling portrait of a rare Tonkin snub-nosed monkey (spotted in the rainforest of Vietnam) appears on page five of the November 2012 National Geographic Magazine. PhD student, Quyet Le's photo, was selected as the latest winner of their "Wildlife as Canon Sees It" campaign in support of endangered wildlife.

  • A major exhibition of Maya pottery opens October 19-21 at Princeton University. Several of Inga Calvin's rollout photographs have been included in the catalogue entitled, "Dancing into Dreams: Maya Vase Painting of the Ik' Kingdom": http://www.princetonartmuseum.org/art/exhibitions/1384.
  • James Millette, PhD student, has received a National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant and a Leaky Foundation Grant to conduct his fieldwork for: "Challenging Assumptions of Dental Senescence Using a Primate Framework". His current work is on ring-tailed lemurs at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve in Southwestern Madagascar.
  • Art Joyce was awarded a grant from the Religion and Innovation in Human Affairs Program of the Historical Society through the Templeton Foundation. His funded archaeological project is designed to examine the role of religion in the social and political innovations that led to the emergence of Mesoamerican civilization. The final product will be a co-authored book examining the relationship between religion and political centralization in Formative Mesoamerica.
  • Donna Goldstein has accepted the directorship of the Center to Advance Research and Teaching in the Social Sciences (CARTSS).
  • The June 2012 issue of the American Journal of Physical Anthropology features a series of articles on "Dental Ecology" stemming from a symposium held at the 2010 annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists organized by Frank Cuozzo and Michelle Sauther. CU-Boulder Anthropology affiliated authors in this volume include Frank Cuozzo (PhD '2000; Adjunct Associate Professor), Michelle Sauther (Associate Professor), Matt Sponheimer (Associate Professor), and James Millette (PhD candidate).
  • Paul Sandberg (PhD candidate) and Matt Sponheimer published a study in the June 27 Nature online magazine, suggesting that Austalopithecus sediba was unique among our most ancient hominid relatives in yet another way: its chimp-like diet.
  • Darna Dufour co-edited a second edition of her Nutritional Anthropology textbook, just released from Oxford University Press.
  • Dawa Lokyitsang, MA student, has been selected as a recipient of a Dalai Lama Trust scholarship for 2012-2013. The scholarship program is intended to further the human capital development of the Tibetan people by supporting the pursuit of excellence among Tibetan students in a specialized academic field.
  • A Fulbright grant to conduct dissertation fieldwork in Burkina Faso, West Africa, has been awarded to PhD candidate Wm. Porter Bourie. Drawing from his experiences as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Togo and preliminary fieldwork in Niger and Mali, Porter will be examining local environmental knowledge of desertification in the context of a water resource management project.
  • Courtney Lee (MA '06) received her PhD this May from the University of Colorado-Denver in Health & Behavioral Sciences. Her dissertation was awarded the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 2011-2012 Outstanding Graduate Student Award and was entitled, Costa Rica at a Crossroads: The Ideological Contradictions of Medical Tourism.
  • Amy Harrison Levine, PhD student, has been awarded a Margot Marsh Biodiversity Foundation grant for her dissertation project. The award is going through the Denver Zoo where Amy is employed full-time as Conservation Biology Manager.
  • The CU Center to Advance Research in the Social Sciences Board awarded Donna Goldstein Smith Scholar Funds in support of her project entitled Genetic Futures of the Nuclear Age: Anthropologist and Human Geneticist Dr. James V. Neel.  Graduate student Lindsay Ofrias has been awarded CARTSS Graduate Fellow Funds in support of her project Oil Waste Cleanup in the Ecuadorian Amazon: Citizenship, the State, and Transnationalism.
  • Paul Sandberg was nominated by the department and has been selected to receive a 2012 Graduate Summer Fellowship. He'll be using it to complete Investigating Childhood Diet and Early Life History in the Archaeologicl Record Using Biogeochemical Techniques.
  • Graduate students Chris Morris and Magda Stawkowski have both been selected to receive a 2012-2013 Graduate School Dissertation Completion Fellowship. This fellowship will support them for one semester during the 2012-2013 academic year.
  • Katy Putsavage was accepted for a fellowship to a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute program: "Mesoamerica and the Southwest: A New History for an Ancient Land".  This five-week Institute is held on-site in Mexico and the U.S. Southwest and will enable participants to explore the rapidly accumulating new collaborative scholarship by investigators in both Mesoamerica and the ancient Southwest.
  • Graduate student Magda Stawkowski has won both the Social Science Research Council Eurasia Program Dissertation Development Award and the P.E.O. Scholar Award, which is granted by an international women's organization.
  • Carole McGranahan received a Fulbright Scholar Grant for her upcoming research in India in 2013 on her project, "Refugees and Citizenship: Tibetan Practices of Political Subjectivity in Postcolonial India".
  • The keynote lecture at the "Learning by Example: Building Arguments Ethnographically" Conference at Oxford University on April 16 will be given by Carole McGranahan.
  • 2 articles will be published in March/April 2012 that were authored by Carole McGranahan: "An Anthropologist in Political Asylum Court, Part I"  and "Anthropology and the Truths of Political Asylum, Part II", both in Anthropology News.
  • Matt Sponheimer's recent Science paper on hominin diets was referenced in the cover story of the latest Scientific American, "First of Our Kind" which examines Lee Berger's controversial interpretations of Australopithecus sediba's place in hominin ancestry.
  • Dennis McGilvray was interviewed for KGNU's "Living Dialogs" broadcast of the Asia on Edge Symposium.
  • Gerardo Gutierrez collaborated on a comprehensive study on the genetic admixture of the Latino American population. The results are on file in the Library of Congress, entitled "Development of a Panel of Genome-Wide Ancestry Informative Markers to Study Admixture Throughout the Americas", http://www.plosgenetics.org/doi/pgen.1002554.
  • Graduate student Michaela Howells made the cover of the Samoa News (the islands' newspaper) for a community outreach effort - judging an island fafafine contest.
  • Cathy Cameron is among the visiting scholars invited to Southern Illinois University at the end of March 2012 to speak at the conference on "The Archaeology of Slavery: Toward a Comparative, Global Framework". The annual conference is sponsored by the Center for Archaeological Investigations in Carbondale.
  • Graduate student, Guy Hepp, received a Dissertation Improvement Grant from the National Science Foundation for his research in Oaxaca, Mexico.
  • A National Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Grant was also given to Katy Putsavage for her study of "Demographic and Social Transformations in the Mimbres Region: An Investigation of the Black Mountain Site and Phase (A.D. 1130 to 1300)".
  • Jakob Sedig, graduate student, has been awarded an NSF Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant. The grant will cover the cost of field equipment, lodging, transportation and artifact analysis for his research at Woodrow Ruin, in southwest New Mexico.
  • Carole McGranahan was featured in STEMinist Profiles, a regular feature spotlighting Women in Science, Tech, Engineering and Math.
  • PhD student Ben Joffe was interviewed as an anthropologist by students at the Logan School for Creative Learning in Denver about folklore, fairy tales and comparative mythology.
  • Graduate students, Oliver Paine and Jen Leichliter, gave a well-attended talk, "Paleoecological Reconstruction: Interpreting the South African Hominin Fossil Record" in the main lecture hall at The National Museum, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
  • Jamie Forde, PhD student, recently won an NSF doctoral dissertation improvement grant and a National Geographic Society/Waitt Grant to support his proposed project "The Conquest of the Hill of the Sun: Archaeological Investigations of Indigenous Cultural Change and Persistence at Colonial Achiutla, Oaxaca, Mexico".