2011 Department News

  • Surviving Sudden Environmental Change, Answers from Archaeology, edited by Jago Cooper and Payson Sheets, will be released in January 2012. Archaeologists have long encountered evidence of natural disasters through excavation and stratigraphy. In this book, case studies examine how eight different past human communities - ranging from Arctic to equatorial regions, from tropical rainforests to desert interiors, and from deep prehistory to living memory - faced and coped with such dangers.
  • Katy Putsavage published an article about her New Mexico research site in December's Anthropology News Online.
  • PhD student, Katherine McCardwell, has an article on page 6 of the latest Anthropology News (v. 52, n. 9, Dec 2011), "Narrating the Local and Global; Peace Corps and Community in the Museum of Local History". In the article, Kathy gives her perspective on how an exhibit at the Sheldon Museum and Cultural Center in Haines, Alaska " . . . breaks down traditional ideas about local history as tied to a timeless other."
  • Paul Shankman gave the 2011 Distinguished Lecture in Anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History on December 15th. The subject of his lecture was Margaret Mead.
  • Graduate students Andie Ang, Marni LaFleur, Jen Leichliter, Willi Lempert, Morgan Seamont, Dani Merriman, and Oliver Paine have been awarded CU's 2011 Haskell Houghtelin Grants for their research.
  • Michelle Sauther has been honored with a College Scholar award. She plans to use this award in the future to help work up ten years of data on lemur health and the effects of drought, cyclones and human changes in the environment at Beza Mahafaly, Madagascar.
  • PhD candidate, Jim Millette, has just received a Leakey Grant for his dissertation work at Beza Mahafaly, Madagascar on dental senescence. Along with the generous Scott Ferris fund, this will allow Jim to carry out his research beginning this June 2012.
  • Christine Dixon and Adam Blanford, PhD candidates, were co-authors with Payson Sheets for the article, "Manioc Cultivation at Cerén, El Salvador: Occasional Kitchen Garden Plant or Staple Crop?" which was published in the Spring 2011 edition of Cambridge University's journal Ancient Mesoamerica.
  • Laura DeLuca (PhD '02) received a Fulbright Specialist Program grant to support a short-term project in Pretoria, South Africa. She will be convening a round table meeting with Dr. Maphosa of the Africa Institute of South Africa in January 2012 for their book on Community-based Peace Building in Africa.
  • Art Joyce and Marc Levine (PhD '07) have co-authored an article, "Shifting Patterns of Obsidian Exchange in Postclassic Oaxaca, Mexico" for the Spring 2011 edition of Cambridge University's journal Ancient Mesoamerica. Payson Sheets has also published an article in the same edition of the journal, "Manioc Cultivation at Cerén, El Salvador: Occasional Kitchen Garden Plant or Staple Crop?"
  • Jamie Forde just won an NSF Doctoral Dissertation Improvement grant. The title of his proposal is "Indigenous Responses to Colonialism at Achiutla, Oaxaca, Mexico."
  • Art Joyce and Gerardo Gutiérrez were recently invited by Dumbarton Oaks to give presentations at their symposium. Joyce spoke on "Debating Warfare in Late Formative Oaxaca" and Gutiérrez offered his expertise on "Aztec Battlefields in Eastern Guerrero: A Landscape Analysis of the Conquest of the Kingdom of Tlapa-Tlachinollan."
  • Matt Sponheimer and his research partner Peter Ungar were invited by Science magazine to write a review of the state of research in early hominin diets. Their piece appears in the latest edition of Science at: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/334/6053/190.
  • Terry McCabe received a grant from NSF. He is Co-Principal Investigator with Paul Leslie on "Multi Level Response Diversity: Land Use, Livelihood Diversification and Resilience in Northern Tanzania."
  • Magda Stawkowski (PhD Candidate) has been invited to present her research to the US State Department.
  • Payson Sheets and his excavation team in El Salvador stumbled upon a "sacbe" or "White Way." Grad students Chris Dixon, Zan Halmbacher, and Theresa Heindel were proceeding with their NSF-funded dig when they struck upon a ceremonial road in the village of Ceren.
  • Gerardo Gutiérrez has published a new book called Contlalco y la Coquera which uncovers a strikingly early and massive pyramid site in Guerrero.
  • Marc Levine (PhD 2007) was recently elected to a one year term as Program Editor-Elect, to be followed by a two year term as Program Editor, for the Archaeology Division of the American Anthropological Association.
  • Katy Putsavage won an award from the American Philosophical Society through the Lewis and Clark Fund for Exploration and Field Research. More recently, Putsavage was awarded a UGGS Travel Grant to present at the Chacmool Conference this November.
  • PhD student Magda Stawkowski recently received a medal in Kazakhstan from Olzhas Suleimenov for her "outstanding contribution to the anti-nuclear movement."  She also helped the Atomic Testing Museum (Nevada) and the Karaganda EcoMuseum (Kazakhstan) write a successful joint educational grant titled, "Nuclear Weapons Testing Legacy: The Tale of Two Cultures."
  • Brenda Todd has been chosen to receive an Appreciation Award by the Board of Directors of the Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society for her work as assistant to Steve Lekson during his tenure as Acquisitions Editor of the journal Kiva.
  • Michelle Sauther and Frank Cuozzo (PhD '00; Assoc. Prof. Anth. UND; Asst. Prof. Adjunct UCB) recently won an award for the best poster presentation at the 15th International Symposium on Dental Morphology held in August 2011 in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, United Kingdom. Their poster was titled, "Toothcomb function and use in wild ring-tailed lemurs: Implications for the evolution of the prosimian toothcomb" and was based on their long-term research in Madagascar.
  • PhD student Ivy Hepp has published an article in the Kroeber Anthropological Society Papers out of Berkeley. Her article, co-authored with Josh Englehardt, is entitled "Speaking the Same Language: Bridging the Ever-Growing Disciplinary Divide Between Cultural Anthropology and Archaeology" and can be found in Issue 100 of the journal via this link: http://kas.berkeley.edu/current-issues.html.
  • Katy Putsavage and Jakob Sedig conducted summer tours of their respective research sites for the New Mexico Archaeological Council. Katy provided an excellent tour of the Black Mountain and Salado pueblo excavations at the Black Mountain site; Jakob discussed his new research results from the Woodrow Ruin, a large Late Pithouse and Classic Mimbres occupation in the Gila River drainage.
  • Mark Mitchell (PhD '11) has been asked to release his edited volume, Across a Great Divide, as an e-book from University of Arizona Press. (Across a Great Divide; Continuity and Change in Native North American Societies, 1400-1900. Edited by Laura L. Scheiber and Mark D. Mitchell. ISBN 978-0-8165-2871-4.)
  • PhD student Amy Harrison Levine, has accepted a senior level position at the Denver Zoo as Conservation Biology Coordinator. Her primary responsibility will be to manage a conservation program in Southeast Asia - the first component will include her dissertation research regarding threats to critically endangered Tonkin snub-nosed monkeys in Vietnam.
  • Matt Sponheimer is on a team whose recent findings regarding an extinct hominid nicknamed 'Nutcracker Man' have been widely publicized. They looked at the eating habits of Paranthropus boisei and findings will be published in the next issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. For a local news article, see http://www.dailycamera.com/news/ci_17977428?source=email.
  • Guy Hepp has won a Fulbright for his research in coastal Oaxaca, Mexico. Guy is interested in an Early Formative (ca 1900-850BC) site, La Consentida, and the origins of social complexity. He was recently able to establish the chronology of the site occupation with carbon dating.
  • Both Marnie Thomson and Michaela Howells have received Wenner Gren Foundation Awards.
  • Richard Bender won the Juan Comas Prize at the AAPA conference for his poster on "Stable isotopes(13C and 15N) track socioeconomic differences among urban Colombian women".
  • National Science Foundation grants have been awarded to Payson Sheets for "Root Crop Agriculture, Land Use, and Authority Outside of the Ceren Village, El Salvador" and Art Joyce for "Collaborative Research: Political Integration of the Formative Period Rio Viejo State, Oaxaca, Mexico".
  • Rachel Fleming has been selected for a Fulbright grant to India for 2011-2012. Rachel will use the grant to conduct her dissertation research in Bangalore, where she will study changes in family expectations and gender roles for upwardly mobile young women entering the professional workforce.
  • A National Geographic Society Research and Exploration Grant has been awarded to Marni La Fleur for her work in Madagascar.
  • Aimee Garza (MA '07) has won a Ford Foundation fellowship to conduct field research for her PhD dissertation in cultural anthropology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Aimee's project will study cultural identities among Hispanic residents and Mexican migrants to Santa Fe, NM.
  • An International Dissertation Research Fellowship from The Social Science Research Council has been awarded to Marnie Thomson. The SSRC is an independent, nonprofit international organization that "nurtures new generations of social scientists, fosters innovative research, and mobilizes necessary knowledge on important public issues." The IDRF will provide support for housing and living costs, return travel to her research site and related research expenses. Thomson is one of 77 awardees among 1213 applicants.
  • Jakob Sedig and Jessica Hedgepeth are each recipients of fellowships from the Center to Advance Research and Teaching in the Social Sciences.
  • There is a new article in the March edition of The SAA Archaeological Record. In "Still Digging", Steve Lekson reflects on his professional path for the "Careers in Archaeology" section of the journal, pp. 32-34.
  • Kate Fischer wrote a book review for the April Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology. Her review is on pp. 201-212 and is of Peter Luetchford's Fair Trade and a Global Commodity: Coffee in Costa Rica, London: Pluto Press, 2008.
  • David Hoffman (PhD '06) and Alicia Davis (PhD '10) have recently published articles in a special section of Conservation and Society on Protected Areas and Migration: http://www.conservationandsociety.org/currentissue.asp?sabs=n: "Do global statistics represent local reality and should they guide conservation policy?: Examples from Costa Rica" by David Hoffman and "Ha! What is the benefit of living next to the park? Factors limiting in-migration next to Tarangire National Park, Tanzania" by Alicia Davis.
  • Carole McGranahan has received a Fulbright grant, and a faculty research fellowship from the American Institute of Indian Studies, to go to India next year for her new research project "Refugees and Citizenship: Tibetan Practices of Political Subjectivity in Postcolonial India."
  • Marc Levine (PhD ’07) has an article in the March American Anthropologist: “Negotiating Political Economy at Late Postclassic Tututepec (Yucu Dzaa), Oaxaca, Mexico. pp. 22-29. It is illustrated on the journal cover. Carlos Torres (PhD ’10) co-published a book review in the same edition of this prestigious journal. He and Katie Earnshaw (U. Cambridge) consider five photographic books from The Chiapas Photography Project in the Visual Anthropology section, pp. 154-156.
  • Cathy Cameron is pictured in the January edition of Anthropology News announcing her Weatherhead Fellowship award for her book project Captives: Invisible Agents of Change. In the book she sheds light on the relationships of gender, power and sexuality that surround the lives of captive women throughout time.
  • Arizona State University plans to publish as a book, Mark Mitchell's recently defended doctoral thesis on Continuity and Change in the Organization of Mandan Craft Production, 1400-1750.