2010-11 Department News

  • Graduate student Katy Putsavage will receive funding from the New Mexico Archaeological Council for a neutron activation analysis (INAA) study of 50 ceramics from the Black Mountain site located in the Mimbres region. The research will allow for a more detailed understanding of how the people at the site were interacting with others in the region during the dramatic social and demographic changes in post 1125 AD.
  • The College Professors of Distinction at CU-Arts and Sciences, have awarded Payson Sheets a College Scholar Award. This is a special honor for "scholarship and creative accomplishment and promise". Payson plans to use the award to extend his sabbatical in Central America next year, hunting evidence of pre-Contact manioc cultivation.
  • Alicia Davis (PhD '10) and Tim Craig ('08) are featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education in a recent article about anthropologists in non-academic careers.
  • The new Associate Director of the Global Studies Academic Program at CU-Boulder is Carol Conzelman (PhD '07).  The position will involve teaching small seminars, facilitating local community engagement projects, mentoring students for Study Abroad and other international experiences, and taking students to Bolivia or Peru for service learning programs each summer.
  • Paul Shankman reviewed a recent biography of Claude Lévi-Strauss in the November 26th issue of Science magazine.
  • The 2011 Roy Chapman Andrews Society Distinguished Explorer Award will be presented to Steve Lekson in a ceremony on February 4, 2011 in Eaton Chapel on the Beloit College campus in Beloit, Wisconsin. He is the first archaeologist to receive this award which is sponsored by the Roy Chapman Andrews Society whose mission is to honor the legacy of one of the most celebrated explorers of the 20th century.
  • Richard Wilshusen (PhD '91, Anthropology Lecturer) has been appointed as the Colorado State Archaeologist and Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer. He will also be a Visiting Scholar at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale for Spring 2011.
  • The keynote speaker for the European-based Association for Environmental Archaeology conference on "The Environment and Civilization" will be Payson Sheets. The conference will be held in Kyoto, Japan from November 30 to December 2, 2010. Payson will be presenting a paper on how ancient egalitarian, ranked and stratified societies in Mexico and Central America handled the massive stresses of explosive volcanic eruptions.
  • The mission of the Latin American Studies Center is to provide an institutional space for research, teaching, and discussion on Latin America at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Donna Goldstein is on the Steering Committee of this newly formed entity; Kate Fischer is the Assistant to the Director. For more information about the Center go to: http://www.colorado.edu/ArtsSciences/lasc/about.html.
  • Bert Covert has been named CU-Boulder's 2010 Global Citizen of the Year. He will receive the award at an International Education Week reception on November 16, 2010.
  • Sandy Mielke, FAMSI web administrator, and Inga Calvin have posted Calvin's research and rollout photographs on the web at http://research.famsi.org/rollouts/rollout_search.php. This fully-searchable database integrates archaeological information with images in order to facilitate scholarship.
  • Gerardo Gutierrez presented his new book on the Archaeology of the Ancient Province of Tlapa in the town hall of the indigenous municipality of Tlapa, Guerrero, Mexico on October 21, 2010, forging positive ties among the native communities of Guerrero, Mexico and the University of Colorado.
  • Dennis Van Gerven has been honored by the Alumni Association as one of three recipients of the 2010 Teacher Recognition Award. These awards are student-chosen awards for professors and have been a tradition since 1962. This is the fourth time students have selected Van Gerven for his excellence in teaching.
  • Dennis McGilvray and associate Michele Gamburd co-authored an article about the Sri Lanka tsunami research project in the October 2010 issue of Anthropology News. Their piece was included in a set on "Disaster Relief and Recovery".
  • Amy Harrison-Levine, PhD student, has received an award from the Denver Zoo for her dissertation research regarding, "The Human-Nonhuman Primate Interface in Ha Giang Province, Vietnam". Her research focuses on Tonkin snub-nosed monkeys living in the Khua Ca forest. This group represents the only known remaining viable population of these monkeys in the world.
  • CU Denver's assistant professor of anthropology, Julien Riel-Salvatore, has done research into Neanderthals and has shown that they could adapt, innovate and evolve technology all on their own - read more. Cathy Cameron, an editor with the Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, tells us that his work will be featured in the upcoming December 2010 issue.
  • "The Material Culture of Incipient Social Complexity in Pacific Coastal Mesoamerica: The Ceramics of 'La Consentida' " was presented by Guy Hepp on October 2, 2010 at the Colorado Archaeological Society annual meeting in Gunnison.
  • A National Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Award has been given to Marni LaFleur for her research in Madagascar entitled: Testing the Energy Conservation Hypothesis for Female Dominance in Wild Ring-tailed Lemurs with Implications for the Evolution of Lemur Traits.
  • Paul Shankman has been invited to give the annual Distinguished Lecture in Anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History in New York this December 22. The topic will be the Mead-Freeman controversy.
  • In a recent issue of Museum Anthropology, Steve Lekson reflects on changing relations between museums and tribes over the years. The article is titled, "Commentary: My Adventures in Zuni---and Kykotsmovi and Window Rock and . . . "  View online - scroll down to article.
  • Michelle Sauther's research in Madagascar with partner Frank Cuozzo (PhD '00) is highlighted in Popular Anthropology, a free online magazine dedicated to fostering a dialogue between anthropologists and the general public. View online - scroll to pages 28-29.
  • Graduate student, Michaela Howells, has won a National Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Grant for her study of, "The Impact of Globalization and Psychosocial Stress on Gestation Length and Pregnancy Outcomes on the Pacific Island of Tutuila". Michaela will be shipping off to Polynesia soon to begin her research in earnest.
  • Gerardo Gutierrez during the Summer of 2010 presented copies of the Humboldt codices to the Native communities where they originated in Tlapa, Mexico. One of the goals of publishing the codices was to provide the communities who paid the tribute, and depicted the payments, with an historical record for their own keeping.

                                                   

  • Arrested Histories: Tibet, the CIA, and Memories of a Forgotten War, authored by Carole McGranahan is hot off the press. Drawing on rich ethnographic and historical research, McGranahan tells the story of the Tibetan resistance and the social processes through which this history is made and unmade, and lived and forgotten in the present.
  • Kaifa Roland's book on Cuba is also out and available from Oxford University Press. Cuban Color in Tourism and La Lucha describes the shifting intersections of race, class, sexuality, and belonging.
  • PhD student, Katy Putsavage, has received a grant from the New Mexico Archaeological Council for preliminary ceramic INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis) studies.
  • The CU Museum of Natural History has been awarded two major grants that will promote collaboration with the Navajo Nation in documenting and caring for objects in the museum's Anthropology collection as well as fostering learning opportunities at home and abroad. Jen Shannon will be actively involved in this endeavor.
  • A 2010 Goldstein Altman Graduate Research Award recipient, Rachel Fleming, is spending the summer in Bangalore. Rachel is exploring how issues are linked to ideas about gender though questions about the increasing professionalization of Indian women, the rise of the Indian middle class and its separation fom lower classes, and the place of right-wing Hinduism in a city that symbolizes a future vision of modern, globablized, and cosmopolitan India.

                                                               

  • Hillmon's Bones, the award-winning film produced by students in ATLAS of Dennis Van Gerven's research into the identity of famously-disputed remains in Kansas, was an official selection at the 2010 Big Muddy Film Festival in Carbondale, Illinois.
  • A PhD candidate, Paul Sandberg, was awarded a Wenner-Gren Foundation Grant to aid his fieldwork research on "High Resolution Reconstruction of Early Life History Events in Archaeological Humans: A Biogeochemical Approach". Paul will be off to England to launch his research late this summer.
  • Carla Jones has published an article in the latest American Anthropologist, "Better Women: The Cultural Politics of Gendered Expertise in Indonesia".
  • Matt Sponheimer is on the team that made the very exciting recent discovery of what may be a new hominid species in South Africa. Australopithecus sediba "is at the point where we transition from an ape that walks on two legs to, effectively, us," lead scientist Professor Lee Berger of the University of the Witwatersrand told BBC News.
  • One of our rising stars, Rachel Fleming, is featured in the latest Inside CU e-zine, as she "turns the spotlight on South Asia".
  • Payson Sheets is the Principal Investigator for a National Science Foundation grant in support of the project entitled "Living with the Dangers of Sudden Environmental Change".
  • A chapter written by Gerardo Gutierrez entitled, "The Archaeology of a Native Map: the Lienzo of Chiepetlan 1", can be found in a newly-released book published by the University of Guerrero and the Secretary of Indigenous Affairs of the State of Guerrero.
  • Dennis McGilvray has co-edited a new book out from Routledge: Tsunami Recovery in Sri Lanka: Ethnic and Regional Dimensions. The book is framed . . . to illustrate how disaster relief unfolded in a culturally pluralistic political landscape.
  • The National Science Foundation has requested that Payson Sheets write a special report of his research on manioc cultivation by the ancient Maya. They consider his work to be, "highly successful, with potentially significant applications."
  • On January 29, 2010, Payson Sheets gave a lecture at Columbia University entitled, "The Unintended Consequences of an Ancient Religious Conversion in Costa Rica". This lecture is co-sponsored by the Archaeological Institute of America.
  • Inga Calvin (PhD ’06, Lecturer UCB) gave a lecture to the Precolumbian Society at the University of Pennsylvania of Archaeology and Anthropology on January 9. Calvin’s lecture was entitled "Text, Pseudo-Text,and Context: A Study of Classic Period Maya Ceramic Inscriptions."
  • Gerardo Gutierrez’ work on the Humboldt and Azoyu Codices has been published in a remarkable bilingual edition with a 25-foot color pullout facsimile of the fragments: Códice Humboldt Fragmento 1 (Ms.amer.2) y Códice Azoyú 2 Reverso: Nómina de tributos de Tlapa y su provincial al Imperio Mexicano. Bilingual (Spanish-English) edition. Mexico: CIESAS and Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz. The translation was done by his wife, Dr. Mary Pye. This is the only surviving tax record of all the tribute paid to the Aztec empire by one of their subject provinces.
  • Craig Lee (PhD '07, Anthropology Lecturer 2010) will be featured in a National Geographic special airing on January 28, 2010. The series is called "Naked Science" and the episode is called "Surviving Ancient Alaska". Lee had a film crew follow him while he was looking for archaeological material in association with melting ice patches in Denali National Park, Alaska. For more details see: http://instaar.colorado.edu./research/science_spotlights.html#saa .