2007 Department News

  • Bert Covert won a $20,000 award from the Margot March Biodiversity Foundation to continue his research in Conservation of the Critically Endangered Tonkin Snub-nosed Monkey in the Khau Ca Area of Ha Giang Province, Vietnam.

  • Payson Sheets will be put to work by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, now that he’s a fellow, serving a three-year term on the Electorate Nominating Committee.

  • Alice Mossie Brues, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at the University of Colorado, Boulder, died in her sleep on January 14, 2007. Alice was the second woman in the USA to earn a PhD with a specialization in physical anthropology. She is well known for her work in human variation and genetics, and especially for her pioneering work in computer simulations of genetic interactions among human populations.
  • Payson Sheets’ proposal to National Geographic was approved, so he will be going to Ceren, El Salvador, for geophysical research in May and June with grad students Adam Blanford and Chris Dixon, a few DU grad students, plus Larry Conyers and his ground-penetrating radar equipment. They will be imaging the ancient agricultural fields--maize ridges mostly--through 3-4 meters of volcanic ash, looking for patterns and variation, and anomalies that could be very interesting items.
  • Russ McGoodwin has published a lengthy article in the journal, Marine Policy 31(2007) 40-55, "Effects of Climatic Variability on Three Fishing Economies in High-Latitude Regions:  Implications for Fisheries Policies."   Field research was conducted in an Icelandic fishing community, as well as in several indigenous communities in Alaska, exploring the implications of climatic variability and "global warming" for these regions' fisheries policies. 
  • Michelle Sauther won a Bronze Award in the 2007 Council for Advancement and Support of Education District VI website design awards competition. The site was judged on the design and content in competition with offerings from several other Midwest universities.
  • Heather Williams won a generous grant supplement from the National Institute of Health for her PhD research.
  • Carol Conzelman published an article in the February 8th edition of the NACLA Journal of The North American Congress on Latin America entitled, "Yungas Coca Growers Seek Industrialization but Split on Legalization".
  • Congratulations to this year’s winners of the Anthropology Pre-dissertation/Pre-thesis Awards: Jamie Dubendorf, Jessica Hedgepeth, Michaela Howells, Sarah Jennings, Emily Mertz, Jonathan O’Brien, Brenda Todd and Heather Williams. Their excellent proposals have been granted cash awards to support development of their research and to help them obtain external funding.
  • Payson Sheets and a colleague at Northwestern University, Cynthia Robin, have been awarded a grant from the Amerind Foundation in Arizona, as well as permission to hold an Advanced Seminar at their facility, probably in April of 2008.  It will focus on commoner agency and how that can affect societal developments.  Art Joyce is one of nine invited participants.
  • Donna Goldstein has been awarded an Eaton Faculty Award from the Center for Humanities & Arts for her book, Laughter Out Of Place: Race, Class, Violence, and Sexuality in a Rio Shantytown (U Calif Press 2003). This is a newly established award funded by Leslie & Woody Eaton, after whom the Humanities Building was named, and it provides a $1500 prize. 
  • Mark Mitchell has been selected to receive the Earl Morris Award in Archaeology for his outstanding PhD work.
  • Sarah Taylor won a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, so she can relax into her to finish her stable isotope and microwear study of pre-Conquest diet and agriculture in the Lower Rio Verde Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico and whatever doctoral research she chooses from there.
  • Colleen Scanlan-Lyons won a Verona Walker Award through the Beverly Sears foundation for her research in Brazil.
  • Crystal Watson has been awarded a Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship.
  • Kunga Lama has won an Ashby Prize from the Environment and Planning Journal A, which concentrates on spatial organization and restructuring of cities and regions throughout the globe, for publication of his paper “Hip-hop gangsta or most deserving of victims? Transnational migrant identities and the paradox of Tibetan racialization in the USA”. The prize includes cash for Kunga and his co-author, Emily Yeh.
  • James Dixon received the 2007 Professional Achievement Award by the Alaska Anthropological Association.  The award will be presented at the Association’s annual meeting in Anchorage, Alaska in March 2008.
  • Michaela Howells won a William H. Burt award from the CU Museum in support of her primate research.
  • Crystal Watson’s FLAS fellowship is for both summer and the academic year. This summer she will attend the American Institute of Indian Studies in Jaipur, India, where she’ll live with a host family and study intensive intermediate Hindi for 11 weeks. Next year, she’ll use her FLAS to continue her study of Hindi, her research area of South Asia, and Hindu and Islamic religious practices and beliefs.
  • Carla Jones has been awarded a CARTSS Scholar Fund grant of $4000 to conduct fieldwork in Indonesia this summer for her current project, "Flexible Piety: Middle Class Consumption and Islamic Values in Urban Indonesia." 
  • The following individuals have been selected from our department to receive a Beverly Sears Small Grant award. From among a highly competitive field of worthy project proposals, special recognition goes to: Colleen Scanlan-Lyons, Michaela Howells, Emily Mertz, Jessica Hedgepeth, Sarah Taylor, and Zonna Barnes.
  • Our winners of this year’s Walker Van Riper Awards are Jamie Dubendorf, Michaela Howells, Jessica Hedgepeth, Jonathan O'Brien, Emily Mertz and Brenda Todd.
  • Robert Hackenberg, Professor Emeritus of the CU Department of Anthropology, passed away last weekend. After 40 years of association with our department, he remained an active researcher for the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology (BARA) at the University of Arizona in Tucson. His research and advocacy emphasized the health consequences of culture change among non-Western peoples in Southeast Asia, Central America, and the American Southwest. He will be sorely missed.
  • Emily Mertz garnered a generous award from the St. Louis Zoo Wildcare Center for Lemur Conservation for her fieldwork in Madagascar this summer.
  • Jessica Hedgepeth, Chris Dixon, Brenda Todd and new Anthropology graduate admit, Katy Putsavage, all won Alice Hamilton Scholarship awards in support of their archaeological fieldwork in Oaxaca, Ceren, Cahokia, and Mimbres, respectively.
  • Jonathan O’Brien and Emily Mertz have received William H. Burt Awards.
  • Magda Stawkowski has won a full-ride FLAS scholarship for the Summer Workshop in Slavic, East European and Central Asian Languages at Indiana University to study Kazakh. FLAS also awarded a full ride scholarship to Nicole Smith to study Swahili at SCALI, the Summer Cooperative African Language Institute, being held at the University of Illinois this summer.
  • Patricia Lawrence received the Peace and Conflict Studies Faculty Award at the year end reception and celebration on Tuesday, May 1, 2007. She was honored for making a significant contribution to PACS's mission through her teaching and influence on the expansion of the student body enrolled in the Peace and Conflict Studies' Program, for her scholarly and humanitarian work in Sri Lanka's violent conflict, for her publications in the field of peace studies, and for participating in community and international activities that advance peace.
  • Michelle Sauther has recently been awarded a Margot Marsh Biodiversity Foundation award of $10,000 to study introduced mammal predation of wild lemurs at her field site in Madagascar.
  • Mark Mitchell, Curt Nepstad-Thornberry and Doug Bamforth, have just published chapters in the book Plains Village Archaeology; Bison-hunting Farmers in the Central and Northern Plains, Ahler S and Kay M, Eds. Mark’s contribution to this University of Utah Press publication is entitled “Conflict and Cooperation in the Northern Middle Missouri, A.D. 1450-1650,” while “The Shifting Social Landscape of the Fifteenth-century Middle Missouri Region” was published by the cooperative pen of Curt and Doug.
  • Carole McGranahan is pleased to announce that her volume Imperial Formations, edited with Ann Stoler and Peter Perdue, was just released by SAR Press. “The contributors to this volume critique and abandon the limiting assumption that the European colonialism of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries can be taken as the representative form of imperialism. Recasting the study of imperial governance, forms of sovereignty, and the imperial state, the authors pay close attention to non-European empires and the active trade in ideas, practices, and technologies among empires, as well as between metropolitan regions and far-flung colonies. The Ottoman, Russian, Chinese, Spanish, and Japanese empires provide provocative case studies that challenge the temporal and conceptual framework within which colonial studies usually operates.”
  • Russ McGoodwin has published a lengthy review article in Ocean and Coastal Management. The article summarizes the most important recent discourses about fisheries-governance policy, while suggesting that two books recently published by Amsterdam University Press - Fish for Life, and Interactive Fisheries Governance - constitute significant advances in fisheries-governance and policy theory. 
  • Patricia Lawrence has a book hot off the press. Women and the Contested State: Religion, Violence, and Agency in South and Southeast Asia was co-edited with Monique Skidmore for the University of Notre Dame Press. In Chapter 5, Pat details “The Watch of Tamil Women: Women’s Acts in a Transitional Warscape”.
  • Christine Dixon has accepted a Lecturer position for the spring semester at St. Mary's College of California. She'll be teaching an Introduction to Cultural Anthropology course and an upper division Mesoamerica course.
  • Douglas Bamforth’s edited volume, The Allen Site; A Paleoindian Camp in Southwestern Nebraska, is fresh off the University of New Mexico Press. The Allen Site in southwestern Nebraska has nurtured the interest of archaeologists and paleontologists with abundant signs of a long history of human, animal, and environmental activity. Doug “…focuses primarily on Paleoindian land use represented by the Allen Site and the adjacent smaller sites collectively known as the Medicine Creek Paleoindian sites.
  • Congratulations to Sarah Taylor on the publication of her article, “To sip or not to sip: the potential health risks and benefits of coffee drinking". Sarah R. Taylor and Barbara Demmig-Adams [EBIO]. Nutrition and Food Science 37:6 pp. 406-418.
  • Bert Covert has been awarded a Faculty Fellowship for the 2008/09 academic year for a project titled "Conservation and ecology of the Tonkin-snub nosed monkey."  He also has been award a National Science Foundation Grant of $55,000 for 2008.  The NSF grant is titled "Collaborative Research: Conservation and Ecology of the Tonkin Snub-nosed Monkey at Khau Ca, Ha Giang Province, Vietnam."