2006-07 Department News

  • Matt Sponheimer garnered a grant from the L.S.B. Leakey Foundation in support of his research project ‘Using Strontium Isotopes to Investigate Land Use at Olduvai Gorge’.
  • Carole McGranahan has won a Center for Asian Studies Course Development Award for her Explorations course on Tibet. The Freeman Foundation award is designed to increase access to Asian studies courses and the number of students who learn about Asia in university classrooms.
  • Inga Calvin has been named by the Archaeology faculty to receive the Earl Morris Award in recognition of her outstanding graduate work. The award is endowed by the family of the late Earl Morris, who built the CU Museum's anthropological collections from 1913–1956.
  • Errin Weller has received a National Science Foundation doctoral research improvement grant for some $12,000 for remote sensing of Maya sites.
  • Aimee Garza published an article in the Bilingual Research Journal, entitled ‘Hegemonic Multiculturalism: English Immersion, Ideology, and Subtractive Schooling’ in which she addresses the ‘…dissonance between the ideology of multiculturalism and…a…school’s pervasive assimilation agenda…’
  • Jessica Lee and Emily Mertz have won full ride FLAS scholarships with stipends to attend the Summer Cooperative African Language Institute at Indiana University. Jessica will study Swahili and Emily will study Malagasy.
  • David Hoffman has been hired as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environment, Peace and Security: Natural Resources and Sustainable Development Programme at the University for Peace in Ciudad Colon, Costa Rica. He will be teaching courses on conservation, coastal resources, and sustainable tourism for the 2006-2007 academic year.
  • Barbara Piperata has been hired as a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Anthropology at The Ohio State University.
  • Michelle Butler has accepted a Dean’s Distinguished Fellowship for her PhD program at the University of California at Riverside.
  • Errin Weller has won an NSF Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant for her research in ‘Remote Sensing and the Late Classic (AD 650-850) Maya Utilization of Bajos (Seasonal Swamps) at Tikal and Yaxha Peten, Guatemala’. She is working with remote sensing specialists in NASA to explore the ancient use of seasonal swamps called ‘bajos’ to see if they were used for agriculture or other functions in the tropical lowlands of northeastern Guatemala.
  • Craig Lee has published an article in the most recent issue of Southwestern Lore, journal of the Colorado Archaeological Society. (Lee, Craig M., James B. Benedict, and Jess B. Lee.’Ice Patches and Remant Glaciers.’  Southwestern Lore Vol. 72 No. 1, 2006.)
  • Donna Goldstein was one of four faculty chosen as a Fellow to participate in next year's (2006-7) Center for Humanities and Arts year-long seminar titled, "Reaping Profits, Reckoning Loss."  The fellows will meet together in a year-long seminar and present the results of their work in a Spring 2007 Colloquium.  Goldstein will contribute to the seminar by presenting her research on pharmaceutical politics in Mexico, Argentina, and Brazil.
  • Krista Fish has added a grant to her list of winnings: The Sigma Xi Grant-in-aid-of Research.
  • Payson Sheets just received notice that he has been awarded a CARTSS grant for fieldwork in Costa Rica this summer. He and some students and some NASA remote sensing scientists will be walking and field verifying some linear anomalies that they have detected near the Cutris chiefdom. Sheets thinks many will turn out to be constructed ritual entryways and roads between communities.
  • Steve Lekson had two books published in April.  The first, The Archaeology of Chaco Canyon: An Eleventh-Century Pueblo Region Center, is an edited volume published by the School of American Research Press.  It is the product of 10 years of synthesis of the National Park Service's Chaco Research Project.  His second book, Archaeology of the Mimbres Region, Southwestern New Mexico, U.S.A., is a single-authored volume published by the British Archaeological Reports International Series.  This is the result of his work in the Mimbres region early in his career.
  • Michelle Sauther has received a CRCW grant to investigate the biology of ring-tailed lemurs living in a spiny forest in Madagascar called Tsimanompetsotsa. This new work will compare this data with information from her long-term gallery forest site of Beza Mahafaly to better understand how habitat affects dental attrition and health.
  • David Hoffman has just published Dispatches from the Field; neophyte ethnographers in a changing world. David co-edited this volume of ‘provocative essays… penned by advanced graduate students amidst their dissertation fieldwork…as a window into the complexities of being an ethnographer.’ David contributed a chapter, as did Carol Conzelman.
  • Congratulations to this year’s winners of Walker Van Riper Awards: Tim Craig, Jamie Dubendorf, Aimee Garza, and Carey Scheerer. And to winners of Burt Fund Awards: Meegan Anderson, Krista Fish, Jessica Lee, Jim Millette, Mark Mitchell, Niki Osum, Paul Sandberg, and Sarah Taylor.  
  • Inga Calvin has landed a position for Fall at CU Denver, teaching Introduction to Archaeology. She will also continue teaching for the Academy for Lifelong Learning.
  • Courtney Lee has won a stipend to pursue her doctoral work in medical anthropology in the University of Colorado Health and Behavioral Sciences program.
  • The American Museum of Natural History is currently highlighting the work of Michelle Sauther. She is featured in the new AMNH video ‘Lemurs of Madagascar: Surviving on an Island of Change’ which will be playing in the New York museum’s Hall of Biodiversity for the next six months.
  • Jessica Hedgepeth received the Sigma XI Grant-in-Aid grant for Master's thesis research this summer.
  • Dennis Van Gerven has won the Student Organization for Alumni Relations Teacher Recognition Award for a second time! The SOAR is the only student-awarded recognition for excellence in teaching at CU, and Dennis’ huge undergraduate class has been a regular hit with them.
  • Mark Mitchell has published a report in the prestigious journal American Antiquity entitled: ‘Research Traditions, Public Policy, and the Underdevelopment of Theory in Plains Archeology: Tracing the Legacy of the Missouri Basin Project’.
  • Kudos to the winners of the 2006 Alice Hamilton Scholarship from the Colorado Archaeological Society: Sarah Taylor, Jamie Forde, Zonna Barnes, and undergraduate major Diego Villalobos-Zamora.
  • Joanna Mishtal has won a two-year Charlotte Ellertson Social Science Postdoctoral Fellowship in Abortion and Reproductive Health at the Columbia University School of Public Health in New York. She will conduct two years’ research on Reproductive Rights Advocacy beginning in September, right after defending her dissertation.
  • Kunga Lama has published an article in the May edition of Environment and Planning A: "Hip-hop gangsta or most deserving of victims? Transnational migrant identities and the paradox of Tibetan racialization in the USA."
  • Congratulations to our newly-elected Chair, Dennis McGilvray, a nd a huge round of appreciation to Darna Dufour for all the hard work and exceptional organization that she has devoted to our cause. We offer them both high hopes and good wishes on the next lap of their professional adventures. Our best wishes, also, to Doug Bamforth, who will be our Graduate Director, and Cathy Cameron, our just-selected Undergraduate Director for academic years 2006-2008.
  • Bert Covert has been in Hanoi co-hosting the first specialized training course on primate preservation in Vietnam. Vietnam is one of two countries in the world that have the highest numbers of primates facing extinction. While Madagascar has hundreds of experts joining hands to preserve primates, there are few in Vietnam. The three-week training course is being co-held by the Hanoi University for Natural Sciences and the International Conservation Organization.
  • Kunga Lama won a FLAS scholarship, which he'll use to study Chinese--to complement his already existing fluency in Tibetan, Nepali, and Hindi!
  • Russ McGoodwin was the keynote speaker and a participant in a meeting last July in Amsterdam that explored governance theory for natural resources. The meeting was sponsored by the Marine Research Center of the University of Amsterdam, with support from the European Union.
  • James Dixon has received a Nation Science Foundation Grant entitled "Ice Patch Archeology" in the amount of $760,254 (including logistic support). This 5 year grant supports research focusing on archeology, ethnography, and climate change in relation to glaciers and perennial ice patches in the area of Alaska's, Wrangell - St. Elias Mountains. Dixon will be presenting a paper in mid-September entitled "Early Holocene Maritime Adaptations on the Northwest Coast of North America: Excavations at On Your Knees Cave (49-PET-408)" in a symposium entitled "Harvesting the Sea" at the XVth meeting of the International Union of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences, Lisbon, Portugal. 
  • Stephen Lekson has been selected by the Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society and Alta Mira Press as the new Acquisitions Editor for KIVA: The Journal of Southwestern Anthropology and History.
  • James Dixon is an invited keynote speaker at the IX Congress of the Association of Latin American Anthropology and Biology to be held October 11-14 in Minas Gerais, Brazil.  He will speak on ‘The Peopling of the Americas: The Coastal Route’.
  • Kaifa Roland has published her first article while in residence at CU:--Tourism and the Negrificacion of Cuban Identity—appears in the latest edition of Transforming Anthropology; Journal of the Association of Black Anthropologists, Volume 14, No. 2, pages 151-163. The article analyzes the ways contemporary understandings of skin color and foreign-ness in touristic interactions challenge revolutionary conceptualizations of what it means to be Cuban.
  • Jason Chuipka and James Loudon are two of the winners of CU’s Haskell-Houghtelin Fellowship. Colleen Scanlan-Lyons, Dana Whitelaw, and incoming graduate Michelle Trogdon have been awarded the Wilena Cartwright Fellowship for women scholars.
  • Payson Sheets just received the permissions from the Salvadorans in CONCULTURA and from Archaeology to do the geophysical research at the Ceren site this coming summer. Because Ceren is a World Heritage Site, it is difficult and complicated to get Salvadoran permission. Sheets has one National Geographic Society grant in hand, and another in process of evaluation, to support a fairly large field crew.
  • James Hester has just published a biography of the renowned Comanche artist, Rance Hood. Rance Hood, Mystic Painter focuses on his art and its place within Native American art, history and culture. University of New Mexico Press.
  • Carol Conzelman published another book chapter last summer: Conzelman, Caroline S. 2006. "El Movimiento Cocalero en los Yungas de Bolivia: Diferenciación Ideológica, Económica y Política." En N. A. Robins, ed., Conflictos Políticos y Movimientos Sociales en Bolivia. La Paz:  Editorial Plural.
  • James Loudon, Michaela Howells et al., most notably Matt Sponheimer, have published an article in the latest Journal of Human Evolution, “Do ‘savanna’ chimpanzees consume C4 resources?” Volume 51:128-133.
  • Jamie Dubendorf, Magda Stawkowski, Carey Scheerer, and Kunga Lama have been selected from among our cultural anthropology ranks to receive this year’s Haskell-Houghtelin scholarship.  
  • Shannon Gray, having passed her Comprehensive Exam in Anthropology, will be our first recipient of the Dual MA/MBA.
  • Jessica Lee published the first chapter in a new book, Women and Deafness; Double Visions, just out from Gallaudet University Press. Jessica contributed her studies on “Family Matters; Female Dynamics within Deaf Schools”. Pages 5-20.
  • Matt Sponheimer made a splash in science news publications around the world with his newly-developed technique for reconstructing how the diets of early hominids changed through time. His study suggests that Paranthropists did not likely become extinct because of their specialist dietary adaptations, as has been assumed. Read the story at Scientific American.
  • Jack Kelso, Professor and Ombudsman Emeritus, was honored in a Presidential Session of the American Anthropological Association meetings this month in San Jose, for his life work in biological anthropology. An abstract for the discussion “Biocultural Anthropology: The Half-Century Legacy of Jack Kelso”, says this about him: “In one way or another, a large portion of today’s professional anthropologists have been touched by the work of Jack Kelso, whether or not they are aware of it. He has been at the forefront of discussions of ‘race’ and human variability, long arguing against the biological concept of race.”
  • Jim Dixon co-produced a video recently released by the Sealaska Heritage Institute. The 30 minute documentary titled “Kuwóot yas.éin—His Spirit is Looking out the From the Cave”, explores the partnership created between archaeologist and tribal members after human remains were discovered at an Alaskan site. The video is being used nationally as an educational tool exemplifying positive consultation and partnership under the Native American Graves Protections and Repatriation Act. Copies are available through Hidden Landscapes www.hiddenlandscape.com/Sealaska/Alaska.html with all proceeds going to the Sealaska scholarship fund.