2005-06 Department News

  • Donna Goldstein has been awarded the Margaret Mead Award for this year, which will be presented to her in April at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology in Santa Fe.
  • Patricia Lawrence, our Peace and Conflict Studies specialist, will be in Sri Lanka for two weeks relieving exhausted volunteers there.
  • J. Terrence McCabe, associate professor of anthropology and a faculty research associate with the Institute of Behavioral Science at CU-Boulder, and Paul W. Leslie, professor of anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will receive $100,000 over 18 months for their study of "Alternative Consequences of Migration for Land Use and Conservation in Northern Tanzania."
  • Graduate student Marc Levine has been awarded a National Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Grant and a grant from the Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies (FAMSI) for his Ph.D. research on the political economy of the Late Postclassic (A.D. 1100-1521) Tututepec state on the Pacific Coast of Oaxaca, Mexico.
  • Art Joyce has been awarded an ACLS/SSRC/NEH International and Area Studies Fellowship for the 2005-2006 academic year.  The fellowship is in support of a book that he will be writing on the pre-Hispanic history of Oaxaca, Mexico.
  • Graduate student Isa Rodriguez-Soto has had her article, “Reinventando la democracia: Las luchas anti-ROTC después de Vieques” published in the periodical Universidad y (Anti)Militarismo: Historia, Luchas y Debates.
  • Graduate students Dana Whitelaw and Jamie Forde have been selected to receive Beverly Sears Graduate Student Grant awards.
  • Graduate student Craig Lee co-authored an articled entitled "The Emerging Archaeology of Glaciers and Ice Patches: Examples from Alaska’s Wrangell-St.Elias Nathional Park and Preserve" in the most recent issue of American Antiquity along with CU researchers William Manley and James Dixon.
  • Graduate student Colleen Scanlan-Lyons has captured a Fulbright to Brazil to the tune of $40,000 for 18 months of doctoral research.
  • A grant entitled “West Asia: A Critical Region for Undergraduate Education” submitted by Dennis McGilvray (P1) and Steve Snyder (Co-PI) to the Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Languages Program of the US Dept. of Education has been awarded for two years with a budget of $159,000. The grant, which begins July 1, will provide funding for a full-time instructor in West Asian cultural geography and full-time instructor in Hindi language, plus faculty course-development grants, K-12 workshops, visiting speakers, and library materials.
  • Special congratulations to our Chair, Darna Dufour, who was invited to offer the Raymond Pearl Memorial Lecture at the annual convention of the Human Biology Association, in recognition of her major contributions to biocultural anthropology. Her award included an attractive onyx obelisk.
  • Graduate student Alicia Davis won a Fulbright-Hays for nearly $35,000. She will conduct a year’s fieldwork in Tanzania, studying risk and ethnicity in relation to protected lands, i.e. national parks and conservation.
  • Recent awards for outstanding research proposals: Jamie Forde, Jessica Lee, Lindsay Jones and Sheila Goff received Walker Van Riper awards; James Loudon, Jonathan O’Brien, and Larry Ulibarri won William H. Burt Awards; Lori Fields, sole winner of the Clark Native American Student Scholarship for museum-related studies; Aimee Garza will receive a Graduate Student Summer Research Award.
  • Michelle Sauther has also won an award from The Burt Museum Fund for her recent research proposal.
  • American Antiquity has accepted a manuscript by Mark Mitchell, PhD candidate, for publication. Please keep an eye out for "Research Traditions, Public Policy, and the Underdevelopment of Theory in Plains Archaeology: Tracing the Legacy of the Missouri Basin Project" in an upcoming edition.
  • Bert Covert recently hosted a series of workshops that were featured at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists meeting in Milwaukee and also gained the attention of USA Today. An article about Covert's work appeared in the April 26 edition of the newspaper. The workshops focused on primate conservation in Vietnam.
  • Our faculty will be joined by a rising star in the fall. Kaifa Roland brings with her superb teaching skills and exceptional scholarship in Cuba’s use of tourism to sustain its socialist economy. She will be featured in this summer’s edition of News from Hale, our annual alumni newsletter.
  • Dennis McGilvray won an NSF grant to conduct fieldwork on post-tsunami reconstruction and relief efforts in Sri Lanka. He will be joined by Pat Lawrence, who will be doing consultant work for the Asia Foundation on early warning systems to contain grassroots violence.
  • The Environmental Studies faculty has unanimously voted Russ McGoodwin to serve as a member of the ENVS Core Faculty. ENVS Core Faculty serve on a voluntary basis on committees, advise graduate students, and are voting members of the department on fixed term appointments. The ENVS Director wanted to have someone who would provide a link to Anthropology, since ENVS is a broadly interdisciplinary program at both the undergraduate and graduate level. During the forthcoming academic year ENVS will also be developing a strategic plan and Provost's hiring initiative.
  • Payson Sheets has been elected Fellow to the American Association for the Advancement of Science for his ‘distinguished contributions to Mayan archaeology, especially the study of prehistoric volcanism, and for innovative applications of remote sensing and geophysical instrumentation.’ The AAAS, in existence since 1874, will honor Dr. Sheets during a special forum of the AAAS’s Annual Meeting in St. Louis on Saturday, February 18, 2006.
  • Doug Bamforth has been offered a contract from Cambridge University Press to include his book The Archaeology of the North American Great Plains in their Cambridge World Archaeology series.
  • Jonathan O’Brien won a Provost’s Fellowship in Technology through CU’s Graduate Teacher Program. His goal is to produce an interactive CD-ROM for the fall Physical Anthropology labs.