Aerospace Summit Event HeaderCU Boulder Aerospace Summit:

Enabling Mission Success

Tuesday, March 7
 5:45-8 p.m.

History Colorado Center
1200 Broadway 
Denver CO 80203

From asteroids to space weather, CU Boulder's innovative research and outstanding students help power some of the world's pivotal space missions. Join us as we celebrate our outstanding partnerships with aerospace industry leaders and learn more about the
GOES-R and OSIRIS-REx missions.

Featured speakers include: 

  • CU Boulder Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano
  • Frank Eparvier, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) Senior Research Scientist and principal investigator on the EXIS instrument, GOES-R weather satellite mission
  • Dan Scheeres, University of Colorado Distinguished Professor; A. Richard Seebass Chair Professor; Ann and H.J. Smead Department of Aerospace Engineering Science; and Radio Science Lead and Co-Investigator for NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission
  • Michael Gazarik, Vice President Engineering, Ball Aerospace

Cost: $10 per person 
Registration includes one complimentary drink, heavy appetizers and dessert bar. A cash bar will be available

Guests also will have the opportunity to meet with CU Boulder aerospace industry and campus partners during the pre- and post-receptions.

Register today!

* Please note: registration for CU Boulder Aerospace Summit closes on Thursday, Mar. 2. 

Speakers

Dan Scheeres, Radio Science Lead and Co-Investigator for NASA’s OSIRIS REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission

Dan Scheeres, University of Colorado Distinguished Professor; A. Richard Seebass Chair Professor; Ann and H.J. Smead Department of Aerospace Engineering Science; and Radio Science Lead and Co-Investigator for NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission

Biography:

NASA's OSIRIS-REx sample return mission is currently en route to the asteroid Bennu, where it will arrive in 2018. Faculty from the University of Colorado will play a key role in this mission, helping with the design of the planned orbital operations about the asteroid, measuring the mass distribution of the asteroid, and developing a deeper understanding of how this asteroid has physically evolved over time. 

Dan Scheeres is a University of Colorado Distinguished Professor and the A. Richard Seebass Endowed Chair Professor in the Ann & J.H. Smead Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder.  He was awarded PhD. (1992), M.S.E. (1988) and B.S.E (1987) degrees in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Michigan, and holds a B.S. in Letters and Engineering from Calvin College (1985).  Scheeres is a Fellow of both the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the American Astronautical Society.  He has studied the dynamics of the asteroid environment from a scientific, engineering and navigation perspective since 1992 and was involved with the NASA near mission to asteroid Eros and the Hayabusa mission to asteroid Itokawa. He is currently the Radio Science lead on NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission to asteroid Bennu, launched in 2016. Asteroid 8887 is named “Scheeres” in recognition of his contributions to the scientific understanding of the dynamical environment about asteroids.


Frank Eparvier, LASP Senior Research Scientist and principal investigator on the EXIS project

Frank Eparvier, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) Senior Research Scientist and principal investigator on the EXIS instrument, GOES-R weather satellite mission

Biography:

Dr. Frank Eparvier is a Senior Research Scientist at the University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics in Boulder. He has a B.S. degree in Physics and Mathematics from the University of Wisconsin (1985) and a Ph.D. in Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Colorado (1991). He is principal investigator on the EUV (extreme ultraviolet) and X-Ray Irradiance Sensors (EXIS) on the NOAA GOES-R satellite series, instrument and project scientist on the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), instrument lead on the EUV monitor on the NASA MAVEN mission to Mars, and instrument scientist on the Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) on the NASA TIMED mission. His research interests are in the areas of solar irradiance variability and its effects on the upper atmospheres of the Earth and other planets.


Mike Gazarik, Vice President Engineering, Ball Aerospace for Mission Operations Partnerships

Michael Gazarik, Vice President Engineering, Ball Aerospace

Biography:

As the vice president of Engineering for Ball Aerospace, Mike Gazarik provides leadership for many functions that support the company’s strategic business units. 

He is responsible for engineering, manufacturing and test operations, supply chain management, technology development and resource planning. Mike is focused on developing and maintaining the company’s core technologies and capabilities and on developing technical personnel. 

Mike joined Ball in March, 2015 from NASA where he was the Associate Administrator for the Space Technology Mission Directorate at NASA headquarters. Since then, he has worked to align Ball’s technology development with business development and growth strategies. As the Vice President for Engineering, he will provide overall strategic and operational leadership of the organization, which includes all disciplines of engineering as well as manufacturing, testing, supply chain management, facilities, IRAD and intellectual property. 

He earned a bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh and a Master’s and Ph.D. from the Georgia Institute of Technology, also in Electrical Engineering.

Exhibitors

Aerospace Industry Partners:

  • Lockheed Martin
  • Ball Aerospace
  • United Launch Alliance
  •  American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics – Rocky Mountain Section (AIAA-RMS)

CU Boulder Campus Aerospace Partners

  • Grand Challenge
  • Aerospace Ventures
  • Aerospace Department
  • Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP)
  • Space Minor
  • Colorado Space Grant

OSIRIS-REx Mission Overview

OSIRIS-REx seeks answers to the questions that are central to the human experience: Where did we come from? What is our destiny? Asteroids, the leftover debris from the solar system formation process, can answer these questions and teach us about the history of the sun and planets.

The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft is traveling to Bennu, a carbonaceous asteroid whose regolith may record the earliest history of our solar system. Bennu may contain the molecular precursors to the origin of life and the Earth’s oceans. Bennu is also one of the most potentially hazardous asteroids, as it has a relatively high probability of impacting the Earth late in the 22nd century. OSIRIS-REx will determine Bennu’s physical and chemical properties, which will be critical to know in the event of an impact mitigation mission. Finally, asteroids like Bennu contain natural resources such as water, organics, and precious metals. In the future, these asteroids may one day fuel the exploration of the solar system by robotic and manned spacecraft.

OSIRIS-REx’s key science objectives include:

  • Return and analyze a sample of Bennu’s surface
  • Map the asteroid
  • Document the sample site
  • Measure the orbit deviation caused by non-gravitational forces (the Yarkovsky effect)
  • Compare observations at the asteroid to ground-based observations

Scheeres is serving as the Radio Science Lead and Co-Investigator for NASA’s OSIRIS REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission.  

Learn more

GOES-R Mission Overview 

The GOES-R series satellites will provide continuous imagery and atmospheric measurements of Earth’s Western Hemisphere, total lightning data, and space weather monitoring to provide critical atmospheric, hydrologic, oceanic, climatic, solar and space data.

GOES-R series satellites will provide images of weather pattern and severe storms as frequently as every 30 seconds, which will contribute to more accurate and reliable weather forecasts and severe weather outlooks. GOES-R’s environmental data products will support short-term weather forecasts and severe storm watches and warnings, maritime forecasts, seasonal predictions, drought outlooks and space weather predictions. GOES-R products will improve hurricane tracking and intensity forecasts, increase thunderstorm and tornado warning lead time, improve aviation flight route planning, provide data for long-term climate variability studies, improve solar flare warnings for communications and navigation disruptions and enhance space weather monitoring.

Learn more

EXIS Project Overview

Designed and built by CU Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), the instrument suite known as the Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensors (EXIS) is the first of four identical packages that will fly on four NOAA weather satellites in the coming decade. EXIS will measure energy output from the sun that can affect satellite operations, telecommunications, GPS navigation and power grids on Earth as part of NOAA’s next-generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites-R Series (GOES-R).