Resources & Support

Advising

Intra-university Transfer (IUT) - How to

Transfer to and from the College of Arts and Sciences from another CU-Boulder college or school.

Military/ROTC

Learn about the services CU provides for military affiliated students here.

Pre-Health Advising

Pre-Health advising is located with Career Services in C4C. All current CU Boulder students and alumni are eligible to receive pre-health advising services at no charge. Pre-health helps students further define their career goals within the realms of medical school, physical therapy, nursing, dentistry, optometry, veterinary medicine, physician's assistant programs, etc. as well as help guide students to move towards reaching those goals. Their approach to advising is to provide accurate information in a supportive, respectful atmosphere. They offer committee letters, networking opportunities, career fairs, resume-writing sessions, mock interview practices, etc. The advisors in pre-health maintain ongoing contact with admissions officers at health professional schools nationwide, so that we can provide up-to-date advice for students who seek to become competent applicants to health professional schools. Pre-health offers individual advising, small-group seminars and workshops, a list serve for relevant information, a pre-professional credentials file service, sponsored academic courses, a medical-scholars program and more! You can make an appointment with pre-health advising.

Pre-Law Advising

Pre-law advising is located with Career Services in C4C. CU Boulder Pre-Law advisors help current students and alumni decide if law school is the right choice, and if it is, they can further help you determine your path through your undergraduate preparation as well as through the application process. You can make an appointment with pre-law advising. Pre-law, like pre-health, also provides networking opportunities, career fairs, resume-writing sessions, mock interview practices, etc.  The advisors in pre-law maintain ongoing contact with admissions officers at law schools nationwide, so that we can provide up-to-date advice for students who seek to become competent applicants to law schools. 

Resource Center

Do you have a question about your degree audit? Want to know when your enrollment appointment is? Would you like to explore majors? Stop by the Advising Resource Center in Woodbury 109 to meet with a Peer Advisor for help with all these questions, and more!

Who Is My Advisor?

For your first year, you are assigned a First Year Academic Advisor. You will keep working with this advisor until the Fall semester of your Sophomore Year or until you reach 45 credit hours, then students are assigned a Professional Academic Advisor in their area of study.

Your Advisor can help you with the transition to college and will

  • be your point person for exploring and confirming your academic interests and strengths
  • connect you to resources outside of the classroom, and
  • help you to explore your sense of self, values, and skills.

For more information on your specific advisor, see their biographies posted here.

Walk-in Advising/Open Office Hours

It is recommended that you make an appointment with an academic advisor once per term to discuss your academic interests, goals and progress.  All academic advisors also offer walk-in hours, and you may want to take advantage of them for some of your quick questions.  Detailed discussions and planning should be done in an appointment.  

  • If you need more than 10 minutes of your academic advisor’s time, you should make a regular appointment. During walk-in hours, academic advisors need to meet with as many students as possible in a short amount of time.
  • If you’re on academic probation, you must make a regular appointment.  Your academic advisor wants to talk with you about how classes are going, what study strategies you're using, and how the advisor can support you in getting your GPA up. There’s not time for all this during walk-in hours.
  • If you’re a senior planning to graduate in the coming term, you need to make a regular appointment. Your academic advisor needs to check your remaining requirements in a careful, unhurried way, fill out your Statement of Major Status, and explain graduation procedures to you.

Go to your academic advisor’s office prepared. Here’s how to prepare:

  1. Look over your degree audit to determine which requirements you’ve already met and which ones you still need to meet. 
  2. Write down (or type out) your best guess for what classes you should take in the coming term. 
  3. Write down any questions you want to ask the advisor.
  4. Be open to discussing your goals and any challenges you may be having.  Your advisor can help by directing you to opportunities and resources!

Career

Career Services

Career Services (www.colorado.edu/career) helps students discover who they are, what they want to do, and how to get there. They are the bridge between academics and the world of work.

Career Services offers free services for all CU-Boulder degree-seeking students, and alumni up to one year after graduation. Meet individually the staff to discuss major and career exploration, internship or job searching, and graduate school preparation.

Courses/Credits

AB & IB Credit

AP and IB scores must be sent directly from the testing organization to CU. Before requesting to have a score sent, look at the table of AP/IB cutoff scores to make sure you’ll receive CU course credit based on your exam results.

  • To have AP scores reported to CU, visit the CollegeBoard site. The four-digit college code for CU is 4841. 
  • To have IB transcripts sent to CU, visit the International Baccalaureate Organization site.
    • (Note: When you download their transcript-request form, you will notice that it’s a “.dot” document. This is format used by OpenOffice, the free equivalent of Microsoft Office. To open the document with Microsoft Word, just rename it from “.dot” to “.doc” and double-click it. Microsoft Word should then open and convert it.

Note for transfer students: Your AP and IB scores DO NOT come automatically as part of your transcript from your previous institution. You must request that the scores be sent to CU from the testing organization. Additionally, the correlation between exam scores and course credit differ from school to school. Be sure to check the score requirements at CU and don’t assume that you’ll have credit for a course here at CU simply because you did previously. 

For more information please go to the University Catalog site.

Activity Hours

Activity hours are classes that consist primarily of activity or performance, such as music lessons, choirs, bands etc.  These are classes that don’t have a traditional academic component. You can take as many activity hours as you like BUT only 8 activity hours may count toward the total of 120 hours required to graduate. Until you actually take an activity hour class, your degree audit will not track how many of these you have taken. If you are unsure as to whether a class will be counted as activity hours or if those hours are counting toward your required total, see your advisor.

Electives: University vs. Major/Dept.

In order to graduate with a degree from the College of Arts and Sciences, students need to complete a total of 120 credit hours, 45 of which must be upper-division hours.  Some of those credit hours will be from courses that fulfill Core, and others from major requirements.  If you have only one major, and if that major requires relatively few credit hours (say 30-36), then there will be credit hours “left over” that you need to complete to reach the 120 minimum for graduation.  These “left over” courses are general (university) electives.  Some students choose to fulfill their electives by adding a second major, or by pursuing a minor or certificate.  However, other students choose to take elective courses that interest them in a variety of departments.  Always keep in mind that all students in the College of Arts and Sciences need a minimum of 45 upper-division hours, and most majors do not require that many so you will need to take some upper-division elective hours.

Some departments in A&S also require elective credits within the major or department — sometimes at both the lower and upper division level.  You should consult your degree audit (and converse with your major/minor academic advisor) to determine how many (if any) Major/department electives you need to take to fulfill your degree requirements and which courses have been approved to serve as electives within the major or department.

Faculty Course Questionnaire (FCQ)

Near the end of each semester, you will be asked to fill out a form called a Faculty Course Questionnaire (FCQ) for each of your courses. This is your chance to rate both the professor and the course. (If you’re new to CU and haven’t seen one of these forms yet, check out the illustration below.)

The university posts the results of these surveys in a web site that’s visible to all. This would have once been considered a radical idea. Today, it’s a reality, one that you should take advantage of.

Please take these forms seriously! Your fellow students are counting on you, and the university takes professors’ FCQ ratings into consideration in making tenure and promotion decisions.

 

Independent Study

Some professors or instructors will allow you to complete college credit by doing an independent study, i.e., coursework done outside of a regular classroom setting with individual direction from a faculty member on a topic of mutual interest, which is not offered through an existing course. To do an independent study, you’ll need to get special permission from the faculty member who will be supervising your work.

Internships

For academic credit: Internships are an option; they are not required. A maximum of 9 credit hours of approved internship experience may be applied toward graduation.  No more than 6 credit hours may be counted from any single department.  Paid internships usually cannot also be counted as academic credit.

To get academic credit for an internship, you have to find a department AND a faculty member willing to sponsor the internship credit.  Most departments offer internships opportunities only to upper- division students pursuing that major.  It is rare, if not impossible, to find a department willing to sponsor an internship for a student who is not pursuing its major. Each department has its own policies, so please consult the department to find out if internship credit is available.

Not for academic credit: The good news is, getting academic credit isn’t really the important thing. The true benefits of an internship are developing new skills and knowledge, enhancing your résumé, and making professional contacts that could lead to a job after graduation.

Occasionally, a business might require you to receive academic credit in order to intern with them. Basically, they do this to protect themselves legally. (You’ll be working for them without pay, so they want to make it clear that the experience is educational in nature.) If you find yourself in this situation and can’t find a department that will give you actual academic credit, contact Lisa Lovett, the Internship Program Coordinator at Career Services. She will tell you how to sign up for an internship class, CSVC 1000, which should satisfy the requirements of the company for which you plan to intern. The credit you get for the course, however, will not count toward your degree.

Pass/Fail 101
  1. A maximum of 6 credit hours of “pass” can be applied toward the 120 hours required to graduate.*
  2. The pass/fail option may be used only with electives. You cannot take a course pass/fail if you need it to meet a requirement like Core, MAPS, major, minor, or certificate.
  3. Courses taken on a pass/fail basis are NOT noted on class rosters or final-grade lists. The instructor won’t even know that you are taking the course pass/fail. They will assign you a letter grade for the course, and the Registrar’s Office will convert that grade to a “pass” or a “fail.” (a grade of D- or above is converted to a “P”; an “F” remains an “F.”)
  4. If you fail, the “F” is calculated as part of your GPA just like any other “F.” If you pass, your GPA is not affected in any way.

* Exception: Courses that MUST be taken pass/fail do not count against your 6-hour limit. For instance, PSYC 4841 (Independent Study) can only be taken pass/fail, so it doesn’t count against the limit. Similarly, some Study Abroad courses are only available as pass/fail. You can take as many of these as you want. The only courses that count toward the 6 credit hour limit are courses you could take for a letter grade but choose to take pass/fail instead.

What would be a good reason to take a class pass/fail?

  • It’s an elective outside your major that you’re really interested in taking, but you’re worried that you may not have a strong enough background in the subject to make a high grade.
  • You’re taking a heavy load, and by taking this particular elective pass/fail, you can free up more time to study for your other classes.

 

Petitioning to change the grading of a course

After the deadline passes, you can petition the Dean to change a course from pass/fail back to the original letter grade you earned, but these petitions are rarely granted. If you think you have legitimate extenuating circumstances, download a Pass/Fail Petition from the Arts & Sciences Petitions and Forms web page. See the form itself for instructions (where to submit it, etc.). Please note that while you can petition to change a course from pass/fail to letter graded, you cannot petition to change a class from letter-graded to pass/fail.

 

Repeating Courses for Credit

Only very specific courses are repeatable for credit a second time. Generally this is because new content is learned the second time the course is repeated.

For example, internship hours may show as repeatable credit on a student’s transcript because it could have been two separate internships, or been a continuation of the same internship (such as the CU sports medicine internship which may repeat for multiple semesters). Another example is research lab (often repeated for two semesters consecutively), independent study, honors thesis credit hours,  various seminars or workshop classes that change by topic each semester (such as IPHY4010 or WRTG3020), and/or certain activity hours such as band/choir. 

Transfer Credit

Transferring from one university to another can be both exciting and overwhelming. It takes time to adjust to the culture and policies of a new school. The following guide offers tips on how to make your transition to the University of Colorado Boulder College of Arts and Sciences a smooth one. See our Transfer Guide here.

Variable Credit

All independent-study courses and some regular courses are offered on a variable-credit basis. This means that you are able to designate the number of credits you wish to receive for a course. But before you get too excited, thinking you can take a class for 120 hours, you must first work with the instructor of the course to determine the number of hours you are expected to put into the course on a weekly basis. For example, to earn one hour of credit, the usual expectation is three hours of work in the form of research, lab time, literature searches, music practice/performance etc. Once you and the instructor have determined the number of credit hours to be earned, you specify this quantity when your register for the course. The number of credits ranges from 1 to 6 per semester.

Waitlist a Course

You may find that a course section you want fills before you can enroll. You can choose to still sign up for the class, and elect to be placed on the waitlist. Keep in mind that being on the waitlist does not guarantee getting into the class. Our advisors recommend you select another course that works interchangeably (such as another section at a less convenient time), just to be sure that you enroll in the right number of courses. In other words, don’t necessarily rely on getting into the course. When planning your schedule, create a backup plan!

Fields of Study

Certificate vs. Minor

Minors require a minimum of 18 credit hours of coursework in a focused, designated area, typically with nine credit hours of lower-division coursework (classes at the 1000 and 2000 level), and with nine additional credit hours of upper-division coursework (classes at the 3000 and 4000 level). Some minors may require more than 18 credit hours of coursework, and some may require internships or capstone projects at the end of them. Students may receive a minor from any college at the University of Colorado Boulder offering a minor, no matter what the student’s college affiliation is. For example, it is not uncommon for engineering students to earn a chemistry minor from A&S or an A&S student earning a business minor from the Business school. 

Certificates can require any number of credit hours for coursework, but may also require internships, shadowing, volunteer work, and attendance at events and/or conferences. Certificates typically require coursework from a wide variety of disciplines, such as the entrepreneurship certificate. 

Once a student has graduated from the University of Colorado Boulder, a student may later add on an additional major to the original major conferred on his or her degree (if it’s within 10 years of the student’s graduation date); however, a student may NOT do so with minors or certificates. 

Changing Your Major/Minor

At some point you may decide to change your major (or minor) to something else or that you want to drop one or more of your additional majors/minors. Perhaps you’re no longer interested or you realize you don’t have time to complete this additional areas of study. 

Note: You can graduate without completing an additional major and return at a later date to complete it. But you CANNOT graduate without completing any declared minors and you cannot return at a later date to earn a minor. Minors are not awarded once you graduate.

To change a major or minor to another subject, or to drop a major or minor, make an advising appointment with your First Year Advisor or the departmental advisor for the major or minor to be added or dropped (see Making an Advising Appointment). At that appointment you’ll complete a Change of Major form stating what is to be added or dropped.

Declaring and Adding a Major/Minor

First-year students declare/change their major in an individual advising appointment with their first-year advisor.

Sophomores do not declare with their First-year/Open Option advisor.  Instead, they need to sign-up for a major declaration meeting for that major.  You can sign-up for a major declaration meeting through MyCUHub.colorado.edu. Log in and click on “Add/Change my major,” and select the appropriate department to see the available meetings.

At some point in your academic career, you might want to add another major (or more) or a minor to your program. Your primary major is designated as “Major-BA,” indicating the major associated with your Bachelor of Arts degree; additional majors are annotated in your academic record as “Major-ADL.” Minors are noted as Subject-MIN”.

You can investigate majors and minors that you’re interested in adding to your academic plan in one of several ways:

  1. Review the many majors/minors offered in the College of Arts and Sciences. Here you’ll find all of the majors and minors offered in A&S with links to more information.
  2. You can run a degree audit using the “What If” feature for any of the majors in A&S by selecting the major name, e.g, ASTRONOMY-BA; for minors scroll to the bottom of the list to find “Minor in Subject”, Minor in Astronomy. You will see what’s required in the major/minor and how your in-progress and completed coursework apply to this major. An audit for the minor will show only the minor requirements and won’t include A&S core, total hours, etc. like the major audit.

To add an additional major or a minor you must see an academic advisor. If you are a first-year student, make an advising appointment with your First-Year academic advisor and he or she will explain the process to declare the new major  If you are a continuing student, make an appointment with the academic advisor of the new major using the Academic Advising Center’s online-appointment system found at advising.colorado.edu; see the section below on how to make an appointment. Some academic advisors in the “new” department hold individual meetings; others hold group meetings, and still others ask that you complete an online component prior to meeting with them. You’ll be able to see the options when you access the academic advisor’s appointment calendar when you select the “Major/Minor Declaration Info” option in the appointment system.

Degree Audit

Your degree audit is a complete listing of all degree requirements as well as a real-time tracking of your progress toward graduation. It’s available from your MyCUInfo account and should be run after the completion of each semester to verify that classes counted toward your degree as you expected them to. The audit should also be run at the start of each enrollment period to see what remaining requirements you have and thus be a guide to your enrollment for a given term.

To access your degree audit login to your MyCUInfo account; click on the Student tab and then the Degree Audit button in the top center of the screen.
 
Clicking the “Submit a New Audit” button at the bottom of the screen will run the audit for your currently declared major. Clicking the “What If Program” button will allow you to select another major or minor in the College of Arts and Sciences to see those requirements and how your coursework to date fulfills those requirements. 

 

Minor: How to Declare and When

Determine if the minor exists?

First, make sure CU actually offers a minor in the area you’re interested in. If the subject you wanted to minor in is missing from the list, it’s probably because that department doesn’t have the resources to offer a minor. Talk to your advisor about whether you should consider a double major—or just take classes in the other department for your own enrichment.

How do I declare it?

First-year students declare with their first-year advisor.  For sophomore-senior students the procedure for declaring a minor varies from one department to another. Some advisors hold group meetings for students wishing to declare the minor; others allow you to visit their walk-in hours and declare the minor; and still others require you to attend a New Major Meeting, at the end of which they will discuss the minor as well.

As you go through this process, be on the lookout for any special instructions that pertain to the minor rather than the major. 

When should I declare a minor?

Most minors require a minimum of 18 credit hours of course work, so you should probably get started on the course work for your chosen minor no later than your junior year.

As for officially declaring the minor, you can do this as late as the semester you graduate, but it is advisable to declare sooner rather than later. Once you declare the minor, you’ll be able to meet with an academic advisor in that department, and he/she can steer you toward the best professors and classes, help you tailor the minor to your interests, and keep you from making mistakes.

Why do some departments NOT offer a minor?

In some departments, there just aren’t enough resources to accommodate all the students who would be interested in taking a minor. For instance, there are approximately 2,500 students majoring in Psychology and Neuroscience.  If it offered a minor, there would probably be another 2,000 to 5,000 students taking Psychology courses every semester, and the department simply doesn’t have the money to hire that many more instructors. This explains why some of the minors that would be the most popular, such as Psychology and Sociology simply aren’t offered.

In other cases, the nature of a particular discipline (or multidisciplinary program) makes the very idea of a minor untenable. For instance, the Integrative Physiology major includes coursework in biology, chemistry, physics, calculus, anatomy and physiology. Achieving even a basic proficiency in all these areas requires more hours of coursework than could possibly fit into a minor.

Open Option/Undeclared

“Open option” is the term used to refer to students who have not formally declared a major yet. First-year advisors are trained and prepared to help open-option students choose the best possible major based on their passions, goals, interests and their visions of their future and careers attached to that future. These advisors help guide open-option students when they first arrive on campus until they formally declare a major.
First-year students may declare a major with their first-year academic advisor, while continuing students will need to attend a major declaration meeting.

Financial

Bursar’s Office

The bursar’s office handles all aspects of billing associated with  your CU program. It has professionals ready to help CU students understand tax information, break down itemized tuition and fees for in-state and out-of-state individuals, learn how to set up automatic billing, learn how to select or waive health insurance, understand how to grant permission or consent for various tasks, how to activate Identikeys and authorize payers and more. 

Financial Aid
Jobs (On Campus/Off Campus)

See Student Employment or see Career Services. Part of your fees every semester pay for this service. Use it!

Scholarships

Located in the Regent Administration Building, Scholarship Services can help you navigate scholarships that students are automatically considered for, the CU Boulder Scholarship application, scholarships you have to apply for and other opportunities through specific schools and departments. 

General

Honor Code Office

The University’s Honor Code Office. The Honor Code office is administered by students and all hearing panels are composed of trained student volunteers. Such an organization is intended to promote a campus culture that consciously upholds the tenets of academic integrity, and moral and ethical conduct.

Honors: Dept vs. University

There are two types of “Honors” that students may pursue in the College of Arts and Sciences: The first is taking Honors courses offered through the Honors Program. These courses are available to students who meet the 3.3 GPA requirement; there is no formal application process for the Honors Program. In an Honors Program class, one can expect to have more discussion, write more papers, have more influence on the syllabus and reading list, do more research and be counted upon by the class for input.

Pursuing Departmental Honors often requires completing a departmental honors course(s) in one’s senior year, writing and defending an honors thesis, and meeting certain GPA and other requirements set by the department. There are three grades of honors: cum laude, magna cum laude and summa cum laude. Honors are awarded by the University Honors Council on the basis of overall academic record, performance in the writing of an honors thesis and performance in an oral exam.

Research: How to Get Involved

To learn about the research going on in a specific department, visit the department’s CU homepage, or ask your academic advisor about research opportunities in your department. Typically, if research is available in a given department, there will be a research tab or a link to a video about research opportunities on their webpage. 

When you find a faculty member and/or lab whose work sounds interesting to you, contact the appropriate person and ask if there’s any way you could help with the research they’re doing. Make sure you meet any stated requirements (some labs require that you have earned a certain number of credit hours). Be aware that you are unlikely to get paid as a research assistant; most students do the work for Independent Study credit (and, of course, for the experience).

E-mail is always an unobtrusive way to make a first contact, but faculty members are busy and receive a lot of e-mail. Visiting a professor in person during his/her office hours will make a stronger impression.

Regardless of how you make that first contact, be sure to do your homework first: take advantage of whatever is posted online to learn all you can about the work being done in the lab.

Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP): What is it?

Get paid to do research! UROP funds undergraduate research, scholarly and creative work with several types of grants. UROP projects are partnerships between CU’s outstanding faculty and undergraduates from all fields. They offer assistantships, individual grants and team grants. Email urop@colorado.edu to make an appointment. 

Graduation

Changing your Graduation Date

If you would like to change your graduation date after you have submitted a paper and online graduation application, please submit a new online application for graduation via your myCUinfo Portal for the updated graduation term. If you have previously submitted an online application for a different term, submitting a new online application will automatically remove your previously submitted application

Commencement

Did you know: graduation and commencement are not the same thing! Many students, as well as faculty and administrators use these terms interchangeably but in actuality they mean different things. Graduation refers to the completion of all degree requirements and must be applied for; see the section below on Graduation: Applying with your Advisor and Online. Graduation is always associated with the completion of a term, either spring, summer or fall. 

Commencement on the other hand refers to the ceremony that celebrates graduation. The University holds a main ceremony to which all graduates are invited and many departments hold smaller, more intimate ceremonies for their students. Commencement occurs in May and in December upon completion of the spring and fall terms; there isn’t a ceremony in August associated with the summer term. 

Since commencement is only a ceremony a student can attend any one of them, and not necessarily the one associated with their graduation term. Since there is not a ceremony in August it is quite common for August graduation applicants to "walk" in May with their classmates and then complete remaining degree requirements during the summer terms and graduate in August.

The Commencement website details everything you need to know about the Campus-wide and Departmental ceremonies, including dates and times of the recognition ceremonies, information on how to order your cap and gown, and parking details to share with family and friends. Please note that commencement ceremonies are held in May for spring graduates and in December for fall graduates— there is no August commencement ceremony. Prospective August graduates may choose to participate in either the May or December ceremony.

Please be sure to familiarize yourself with the Graduation and Diploma deadlines and submit your application early to ensure your name is included in the Commencement ceremony handbook.

 

Graduation: How to Apply

How to Apply to Graduate:  

Step 1: Submit an Online Application for Graduation via myCUinfo

The first step in the graduation application process is to appy online for graduation via your myCUinfo Portal. Be sure to familiarize yourself with the Graduation and Diploma deadlines and submit your application early to ensure your name is included in the Commencement ceremony handbook and your diploma mailing address is on file.   

Step 2: Meet with your Advisor

Check your degree audit to verify you are on track to have all major/minor/degree requirements fulfilled by the end of your graduation semester. Then, make an appointment to see your advisor to ensure that you are on track and meeting all remaining requirements.

Step 3: Check out the University Commencement website

The Commencement website details everything you need to know about the Campus-wide and Departmental ceremonies, including dates and times of the recognition ceremonies, information on how to order your cap and gown, and parking details to share with family and friends. Please note that commencement ceremonies are held in May for spring graduates and in December for fall graduates— there is no August commencement ceremony. Prospective August graduates may choose to participate in either the May or December ceremony.

International

Study Abroad

The mission of the Office of International Education (OIE) is to actively promote international and intercultural understanding and to enrich the academic and cultural environment of CU-Boulder by facilitating the exchange of people and ideas.  OIE brings CU to the world and the world to CU.

Programs, Support and Resources

Academic Skills Workshops

This is your place on campus to obtain support to help you reach your academic goals. Services through the Academic Skills Program are free to all students. We are committed to providing quality assistance to help you achieve excellence.

ALTEC - Language Learning Support

ALTEC - Language Learning Support is a service department which supports the language learning community at the University and in the state of Colorado.

Bounce Back

Bounce Back is a semester long group for students on academic probation (AP), who are at risk of being on AP, or who are in Continuing Education working toward reinstatement. It is a research based program shown to increase the likelihood of successfully getting off probation. 

Chemistry/Biochemistry Tutor List
Continuing Education
Economics Tutoring
Environmental Center

CU’s Environmental Center catalyzes campus sustainability efforts, and serves as the hub of student-led programs that address the combination of environmental restoration, social justice, and economic vitality. For more information on getting involved, visit their website. You can also stop by their offices in the UMC.

FCQ’s: What are they?

Near the end of each semester, you will be asked to fill out a form called a Faculty Course Questionnaire (FCQ) for each of your courses. This is your chance to rate both the professor and the course. (If you’re new to CU and haven’t seen one of these forms yet, check out the illustration below.)

The university posts the results of these surveys in a web site that’s visible to all. This would have once been considered a radical idea. Today, it’s a reality, one that you should take advantage of.

Please take these forms seriously! Your fellow students are counting on you, and the university takes professors’ FCQ ratings into consideration in making tenure and promotion decisions.

 

Final Exams Schedule/What If My Exam Times Overlap?

Due to the size of CU, conflicts in exam times occur every so often. You have until roughly the tenth week of classes to make Finals arrangements with your instructor. For the specific date, see the Registrar’s Academic Calendars posted here. Search the specific calendar for “Exam Schedule Change.”

For the campus policy on final exams, please visit http://www.colorado.edu/policies/final-examination-policy.

Free Tutoring in Residence Halls and Bear Creek (Academic Support Assistance Program)

Academic Support Assistance Program

  • Provides tutoring in specific courses and subject matter free-of-charge to students living in the residence halls
  • Both drop-in and group sessions available
  • Positively enhances the overall college experience
French Language Tutor List
German Language Tutor List
Hebrew Tutoring
Help Labs

Student help labs are offered in the chemistry and math departments, as well as other departments. Student help labs typically consist of graduate or PhD students in the department who have volunteered their time or who are required to commit certain hours to helping any students, regardless of level, who walk into the help lab with their homework or practice tests, as well as reviewing already-taken exams, during a given block of time.  Help labs are available to students free of charge, and most attendance at helps labs are on a “drop in” basis. 

INVST Leadership Opportunities

INVST Community Studies offers transformative service-learning opportunities that address issues of contemporary social and environmental justice. Their programs, such as the Community Leadership Program and Community Studies Elective Courses, look to build your leadership potential while engaging in local social justice issues. Many of their elective and program opportunities are open to all students. The Community Leadership Program, a two-year intensive leadership program, requires an application and is competitive.

Italian Language Tutor List
Language Placement Testing/Can I test out of foreign language?

Yes! CU requires you to complete a third level of a foreign language before you graduate (this usually takes three semesters). Most students complete this with three years of foreign language taken in high school. If you want to try to test out of CU’s Foreign Language requirement for the Core, visit http://www.colorado.edu/career/testing/exemption-exams-0

Latin Honors

Graduating with Latin Honors (summa cum laude, magna cum laude, and cum laude) can either be done through your department or with CU’s Honors Program, and usually involves writing and defending a thesis. The Honors Program can be found in Norlin Library. For more information, visit the Honors Program website. For information about departmental honors, visit your Major Advisor.

Learner’s Lunch at Norlin Library

Come join us! LEARNER’S LUNCH SERIES Norlin Library Room E113 12:00-1:00. Bring your lunch and join us for an hour of learning. No registration necessary. For more information contact: caroline.sinkinson@colorado.edu or alison.hicks@colorado.edu

Learning Assistants

The Learning Assistant (LA) Program is designed to create environments in large classes in which students can “interact with one another, engage in collaborative problem solving, and articulate and defend their ideas.” LAs are typically undergraduate students who have taken courses in the department and enjoy working with students to facilitate the learning process. Often LAs are pursuing their teacher licensure and are gaining personal experience while helping you!

Math Help Lab

Help for math classes can be found at http://spot.colorado.edu/~carriem/math_advising/help.html

Math Placement: ALEKS

To determine your Math placement, complete the ALEKS assessment. The Math Department uses your score as a hard prerequisite to enroll, which means your score determines where you will begin. Find more information on the test as well as tutorials to help you prepare here: http://www.colorado.edu/academicaffairs/AVCUEaleks.html

Math Tutor List
Nordic Language Tutoring
Online Tutoring
Physics Help Lab
Registrar’s Office

Located in the Regent Administration Center, the Registrar’s Office assists students with registration, orientation, and other specialized services such as transcript distribution, enrollment verification and withdrawal. 

Registration and Academic Calendar - Drop/Add Deadlines
Research Assistance at Norlin Library
Russian Language Tutoring
Student Academic Success Center - Tutoring

The Student Academic Success Center (SASC) is a multicultural advocacy and academic program designed to help students perform successfully at the University level. We will assist all students in locating a tutor for their academic needs; some students might be eligible for financial assistance.

Spanish Tutoring
Study Abroad

Located in the Office of International Education in the Center for Community (C4C), CU’s Study Abroad Office administers more than 300 CU-Boulder-sponsored programs in more than 65 countries around the world. More than 1,000 CU-Boulder students study on CU-Boulder programs annually. They receive in-residence credit, and the credit may be applied to major and college requirements with prior advisor approval. Financial aid and scholarships are available. 

The mission of the Study Abroad Programs unit (SAP) is to provide students with a comprehensive selection of academically sound and experience-rich study-abroad programs that foster their personal development and prepare them to engage successfully in a globally interdependent and culturally diverse world.

Teacher Licensure Program

Are you interested in teaching? If so, then you can earn your teaching licensure while earning your baccalaureate degree! 
The School of Education at the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder) offers several programs leading to initial teacher licensure:     

  • Undergraduate
  • Post-Baccalaureate (Post-BA)
  • Master’s Plus (MA Plus) 
  • CU Teach  

For detailed program descriptions go to: http://www.colorado.edu/education/teacher-licensure

Undergraduate and Post-BA programs lead to licensure in Elementary education, K-12 Music, and the following secondary fields: English, mathematics, science, social studies or foreign languages. 

The MA Plus program leads to a master of arts in education while concurrently earning teacher licensure in Secondary English, mathematics, science or social studies.     

The CU Teach program is a four-year degree/licensure program that allows students to complete a rigorous education in a mathematics or science major and fulfill the requirements for a Colorado initial teaching license in Secondary Mathematics or Secondary Science. It is strongly recommended to take the CU Teach introductory courses (EDUC 2020: Step 1 and EDUC 2030: Step 2).

Student Legal Services

Established in 1977, Student Legal Services (SLS) is a small law office at CU-Boulder dedicated exclusively to serving the legal needs of students. Sponsored by the Student Government and funded in large part by student activity fees, we provide accessible professional legal assistance to eligible students for a fraction of the cost of a private attorney. SLS has several attorneys on staff who can help students make sense of their legal situations, explain their options and/or help them prevent their legal issues from getting out of control. We’ll even tell you if we think you don’t need a lawyer!

Teaching Assistant: How To Become a “TA”

Some departments utilize undergraduates as assistants in teaching their classes. Assistants come in two “flavors”: Learning Assistants (LAs) and Teaching Assistant (TAs). These opportunities are awarded to students who have successfully completed the class in which they would like to assist and are often awarded to students who are interested in going into teaching. In general, these positions require instructor permission, a minimum GPA and a desire to teach. Each department has its own requirements and application/selection process; speak to the department or the instructor teaching a class in which you would like to LA or TA to learn how it’s done in that department.

Do note that the term TA is also used for graduate level teaching assistants. These students are pursuing a post-baccalaureate degree and have been assigned to a TA position as part of their program. So be sure to specify that you’re looking for an undergraduate TA position when approaching a department or you might be summarily turned away!

Tutoring at the Bold Center for Engineering and Applied Science

The BOLD (Broadening Opportunity through Leadership and Diversity) Center is part of CU-Boulder’s commitment to creating an environment where students like you achieve your dreams. Engineering is essential to the health, happiness and safety of our nation and planet, and the strongest engineering solutions are created by a work force diverse in gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic representation. The BOLD Center fosters success through academic resources, student leadership opportunities and a supportive community in order to break down the barriers that keep too many of today’s young talent from reaching their aspirations.

Writing Center

If you need help organizing your essay, visit the Writing Center in the Norlin Library Commons. Their staff members will help you lay out your thoughts, discuss weaknesses in your argument, and discuss strategies for improving your essay overall. For more information or to schedule an appointment, visit 

Registration

Adding Classes

Once the fall or spring term has begun there are two periods during which classes can be added to an existing schedule.

  1. The initial schedule adjust period: This period typically runs through the first 1.5 weeks of the term; see http://registrar.colorado.edu/calendar/calendars_schedules.html for the exact dates in the semester of interest. During this time, classes can be added without instructor signatures via the student’s MyCUInfo.  
  2. The ongoing schedule adjust period: After the initial period and running through Monday of the last week of the semester, classes can be added only with instructor approval/signature on a Special Action Form. This form is available in the instructor’s department and once completed, including the required signature, it will be processed by the department. Classes cannot be added via MyCUInfo past the initial add period of the term.

If you add a class after the start of the term, be mindful of the time that has passed since the start of the term. You will have missed lectures, assignments and possibly exams; be sure that you will be able to catch up in the class and that you’ll be permitted to make-up any opportunities or points. You don’t want to end up doing poorly in the class because you were unable to recover from lost time or that you had to forfeit points.
Additionally, be mindful of co-requisite classes associated with the class you are adding. Be sure to add BOTH the class and its co-req unless you have instructor permission to do otherwise. 
The summer term, being very compressed as compared to the fall/spring terms, has its own add deadlines; please see the registrar’s web site (http://registrar.colorado.edu/calendar/calendars_schedules.html) for the add deadlines in the summer terms. 

Upon processing, check your degree audit to ensure that the class has been added and is posted to the correct component of the audit.

 

 

Advising Help for Registration

During most times of year, you can get an appointment with an academic advisor within a week. However, there are two times of year when this is not true:

  • mid-March through April (registration for the upcoming fall)
  • mid-October through November (registration for the upcoming spring)

At these two times, seemingly all students want to meet with their academic advisor for registration advice, and appointments fill up fast.  Please plan ahead during these busy periods and schedule an appointment with your academic advisor early.  

So, what should you do if you’re not able to get an appointment before your registration date?

  1. Make an appointment now for the first available date that works with your schedule, even though it may be after your registration date.
  2. Use the online tools at your disposal (most notably, your degree audit, FCQs, and the Course Search feature in the registration system) to plan a schedule for the upcoming term.
  3. When your registration date comes, register for classes.
  4. Meet with your advisor on the date of your appointment to review your schedule and make any necessary changes.

Alternatively, you could wait until after you’ve met with your academic advisor to register, but some of the classes you wanted may have filled up in the interim, so this strategy is not recommended. Finally, don't forget that in future semesters, you can make an appointment before the registration madness begins. This takes some planning on your part, but it’s the best strategy of all.

How do I pick classes? or What do I take next?

Check out your degree audit in myCUinfo as the best way to pick coursework. Choose courses based on what you see there and check in with your academic advisor to make sure you’re on the right track.

Consider whether the course satisfies a Core area, if it starts you off into your major, if it’s a class in a field that you are considering or exploring, the time of day, and instructor ratings (called FCQs). 

AP & IB Credit

AP and IB scores must be sent directly from the testing organization to CU. Before requesting to have a score sent, look at the table of AP/IB cutoff scores to make sure you’ll receive CU course credit based on your exam results.

  • To have AP scores reported to CU, visit http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/exgrd_rep.html  
    The four-digit college code for CU is 4841
  • To have IB transcripts sent to CU, visit http://www.ibo.org/iba/transcripts/index.cfm
    Note: When you download their transcript-request form, you will notice that it’s a “.dot” document. This is format used by OpenOffice, the free equivalent of Microsoft Office. To open the document with Microsoft Word, just rename it from “.dot” to “.doc” and double-click it. Microsoft Word should then open and convert it.

Note for transfer students: Your AP and IB scores DO NOT come automatically as part of your transcript from your previous institution. You must request that the scores be sent to CU from the testing organization. Additionally, the correlation between exam scores and course credit differ from school to school. Be sure to check the score requirements at CU and don’t assume that you’ll have credit for a course here at CU simply because you did previously. 

Dropping or Withdrawing from a Class

There are three periods during the fall/spring terms in which a student may drop one or more classes: 

1. The schedule-adjust period: This period typically runs through the first two weeks of the term; see http://registrar.colorado.edu/calendar/calendars_schedules.html for the exact dates. During this time, classes can be dropped without instructor signatures via MyCUInfo (see below). The drop will be processed without a “W” on the transcript and an adjustment to your tuition and fees will be made if applicable.

2. After the schedule adjust period through Week 10 of the semester: During this time, classes can be dropped without instructor signatures via MyCUInfo, BUT a “W” will appear on your transcript, and the tuition and fees are not refunded.  

How to drop a class online:

  • Log in to myCUinfo and go to the “Student” tab.
  • Click on “Register for Classes.” 
  • Click on “Enroll.” 
  • Click on the “Drop” tab.
  • Click on the check box(es) beside the class(es) you want to drop, then click the “DROP SELECTED CLASSES” button. 

Confirm your choice(s) and get a printout of your new schedule (just in case a computer error happens and you end up needing proof that you dropped the class). As always, when making a change to your schedule, run a degree audit, and make sure your new schedule shows up correctly and as intended.

 

If you experience technical difficulties at any point in this process, call the Registrar’s Office at 303-492-6970 or go to the office at Regent 105.

3.  After Week 10 through the last day of classes:  If you want to withdraw from one or more classes, but not all of your classes, you must petition the Dean.  If there are serious mitigating circumstances, your petition might be approved, but you will have to demonstrate fully why those circumstances affected your performance in some class(es) but not others.  To drop one or more classes during this period, follow the steps below:

  • Step 1: Visit the Petitions and Forms page on the Academic Advising Center web site.
  • Step 2: Click on “Late Drop Petition” to download the petition.
  • Step 3: Print the petition, fill out your part, and attach any appropriate documentation.
  • Step 4: Take the form to the instructor. (There’s a part on the second/back page that he or she needs to fill out.)
  • Step 5: Submit the petition, with supporting materials, to the Dean’s office in Woodbury 109.  Be sure to include any and all documentation that supports the claims in your petition, as you must submit them all at the same time.  
  • Step 6: Continue attending class until you have received a decision on your petition, as approvals are not guaranteed.

Whenever you drop a class, be mindful of your student status: dropping a class or classes could place you below 12 credits, and that could have ramifications for housing, financial aid, insurance etc. It is your responsibility to determine if there will be negative consequences in any of these areas if you fall to below full-time status.

Additionally be mindful of co-requisite (lab or co-seminar) classes associated with the class you are dropping. Be sure to drop BOTH of them unless you have instructor permission to remain in one of the classes but not the other. 

Upon processing the drop check your schedule in MyCUInfo and your audit to ensure that the class has been dropped. 

The summer term, being very compressed as compared to the fall/spring terms, has its own drop deadlines; lease see the registrar’s web site for the drop deadlines in the summer terms. 

If you want to drop ALL of your main campus courses for this semester, you can do that anytime through the last day of class. (Note that this is the last day of CLASS, not the last day of Finals Week.) Please see the information under “WITHDRAWING FROM THE TERM”

Some important notes: 

  1. Withdrawing from classes after the term: It’s too late. The Dean does not make exceptions to this policy based on the fact that the University has a VERY generous withdrawal deadline.) If you believe there is an unusual circumstance (i.e., you were in a debilitating car accident and couldn’t withdraw prior to the deadline) contact your advisor for help.
  2. The difference between “dropping” and “withdrawing”: Technically, dropping and withdrawing are two different things. When you drop a course, it disappears from your transcript, and you don’t have to pay for it. When you withdraw from a course, you get a “W” on your transcript and have to pay for it.
    • In a perfect world, these two terms would never get confused. In the real world, however, they are often used interchangeably. In fact, the official form you fill out to withdraw from a single course is called “Arts and Sciences Late Drop Petition.”  Rather than getting hung up on the terminology, the important thing is to understand the consequences of dropping (or withdrawing from) a class at different points in the semester. 
  3. How do I decide whether to withdraw from a class?
    • If you are really struggling in a class, you should MEET WITH THE PROFESSOR (make arrangements for a specific time if you can’t make office hours) and find out exactly where you stand in the class. What is your grade right now? What grades would you need to earn on remaining coursework in order to pass the class? (If you’re taking the class to meet a major requirement, you will need a C- or better. If it’s a Core class or elective, you usually just need a D- or better (but some classes are different, so it’s always good to check with an academic advisor).
  4. Can withdrawing from a class hurt me?
    • For starters, you’ve paid good money for the class and won’t be getting a refund. The amount of money you’re wasting depends on several factors, including whether you pay resident or non-resident tuition, how many other classes you’re taking this semester, and how many classes you’ll end up taking in the future semester (or summer) when you make up for the dropped class.
    • You will be making less progress toward graduation this semester. This may not be a big deal, but in some situations it might mean that you have to take a summer class, take a heavier course load in a future semester, or graduate later than you were planning to.
    • If dropping the class leaves you with fewer than 12 credits, you will no longer be considered a full-time student. See below for a full discussion of this issue.
    • You will have a “W” on your transcript. See below for a detailed discussion of this issue.
  5. Is it bad to drop below 12 credit hours? Not necessarily but as a general rule, you should always consult with your advisor first.  If you answer YES to any of the questions below, you should connect with the corresponding office for more information about the possible ramifications of being a full-time student.
    • Do you live on-campus? If you do, check with your RA or Housing to make sure you can remain in your residence hall as a part-time student.
    • Do you receive financial aid? Being a full-time student may be a stipulation of your financial aid package. To find out if it does, you should contact the Office of Financial Aid or your scholarship provider.
    • Do you work on-campus? Being a part-time student could make you ineligible for employment. Talk to your employer about this.
    • Are you covered under your parents’ health insurance? Some insurance companies only allow children over 18 to be covered if they are a full-time students. If this applies to you, you should contact your health-insurance provider and ask what their specific rules are.
    • Are you an International student? Your Visa status may require you to remain a full-time student. It is critical to check with International Student and Scholar Services BEFORE you drop or withdraw from a course.
    • Are you a Student Veteran? Your Education Benefits may stipulate that you remain a full-time student. It is critical to check with Office of Veterans Services BEFORE you drop or withdraw from a course.
    • Are you a NCAA Student Athlete? Check with your Academic Coordinator before making any schedule changes.
  6. Is having a “W” on my transcript bad? If you plan to apply to grad school, law school, or medical school, having a lot of Ws on your transcript could be seen as an indication that you have trouble managing your life and workload successfully. However, just one “W” probably won’t raise any eyebrows. In any event, a “W” almost always looks better than an “F.” 

 

Enrollment Appointment/When Do I Register?

Your “enrollment appointment” is the period of time during which you’re allowed register for classes for the upcoming semester (this includes summer terms). Unlike a true “appointment” you don’t go to someone’s office and meet with them. This is simply your window of time that you can enroll for classes via MyCUInfo from any computer, from any place..

Your “enrollment appointment” begins on a specific date and time which is given on MyCUInfo in the box on the right-hand side. Click to expand the box to get the full details of your enrollment appointment.

Prior to your enrollment appointment, you do have access to the registration system for the purpose of searching for classes. You can place your intended classes and specific sections into your shopping cart so that when your enrollment appointment begins, you can log into the registration system on myCUinfo, move the classes you’ve placed in your shopping cart through the metaphorical checkout line, and actually register for those courses.

In most cases, your enrollment appointment is fairly lengthy so you have plenty of time to register. However, it’s wisest to register as soon as possible when your appointment opens:  the longer you wait to register, the more classes fill up, potentially locking you out of the classes you wanted to take.

How is my registration date assigned?

Your registration date is based on the number of credit hours you have completed and in progress. For instance, let’s say you have 40 credit hours completed, and you’re taking 15 credit hours this semester. That’s a total of 55 credit hours.

  • The students who have 56 or more credit hours will have a registration time before yours.
  • The students with 54 or fewer credit hours will have a registration time after yours.

What about the other students who have exactly 55 credit hours, just like you? Your registration order within this group is randomized.

If a student with fewer credit hours than you gets to register before you, it may be because they have special registration privileges. For example, student athletes get to register early because their practice schedules cause serious scheduling challenges.

If you think you’ve been assigned an incorrect registration time (which is honestly not too likely), contact the Registrar’s Office. The number is 303-492-6970.

 

 

Holds/How Do I Know If I Have A Registration Hold?

Holds, or actions taken by the University to prevent registration in classes, may be placed for a number of reasons: academic, financial, disciplinary etc. If you have a hold, you’ll need to have it removed before registering for classes. Don’t put this off! Check your holds through your myCUinfo portal to see what action is required of you to have the hold(s) removed. 

 

Pass/Fail 101
  • A maximum of 6 credit hours of “pass” can be applied toward the 120 hours required to graduate.*
  • The pass/fail option may be used only with electives. You cannot take a course pass/fail if you need it to meet a requirement like Core, MAPS, major, minor, or certificate.
  • Courses taken on a pass/fail basis are NOT noted on class rosters or final-grade lists. The instructor won’t even know that you are taking the course pass/fail. They will assign you a letter grade for the course, and the Registrar’s Office will convert that grade to a “pass” or a “fail.” (a grade of D- or above is converted to a “P”; an “F” remains an “F.”)
  •  If you fail, the “F” is calculated as part of your GPA just like any other “F.” If you pass, your GPA is not affected in any way.

Exception: Courses that MUST be taken pass/fail do not count against your 6-hour limit. For instance, PSYC 4841 (Independent Study) can only be taken pass/fail, so it doesn’t count against the limit. Similarly, some Study Abroad courses are only available as pass/fail. You can take as many of these as you want. The only courses that count toward the 6 credit hour limit are courses you could take for a letter grade but choose to take pass/fail instead.

What would be a good reason to take a class pass/fail?

  • It’s an elective outside your major that you’re really interested in taking, but you’re worried that you may not have a strong enough background in the subject to make a high grade.
  • You’re taking a heavy load, and by taking this particular elective pass/fail, you can free up more time to study for your other classes.

 

Petitioning to change the grading of a course

After the deadline passes, you can petition the Dean to change a course from pass/fail back to the original letter grade you earned, but these petitions are rarely granted. If you think you have legitimate extenuating circumstances, download a Pass/Fail Petition from the Arts & Sciences Petitions and Forms web page. See the form itself for instructions (where to submit it, etc.). Please note that while you can petition to change a course from pass/fail to letter graded, you cannot petition to change a class from letter-graded to pass/fail.

 

Variable Credit

All independent-study courses and some regular courses are offered on a variable-credit basis. This means that you are able to designate the number of credits you wish to receive for a course. But before you get too excited, thinking you can take a class for 120 hours, you must first work with the instructor of the course to determine the number of hours you are expected to put into the course on a weekly basis. For example, to earn one hour of credit, the usual expectation is three hours of work in the form of research, lab time, literature searches, music practice/performance etc. Once you and the instructor have determined the number of credit hours to be earned, you specify this quantity when your register for the course. The number of credits ranges from 1 to 6 per semester.

Withdrawing From The Term/University

If in the unfortunate scenario you find yourself needing to withdraw from the entire term, you can do so any time through the last day of class. (Note that this is the last day of CLASS, not the last day of Finals Week.) To do so, go to the withdrawal page on the Registrar’s web site and follow the instructions there. Tuition and fees refund may be possible, depending on the timing of the withdrawal. Please be sure to see your advisor for help in making this decision and for formulatng a plan for your time away from CU and your return.

Wellness

Collegiate Recovery Center

The CU Collegiate Recovery Center (CUCRC) provides support for those in recovery from substance use disorders or addictive behaviors and a home for the sober community on the CU-Boulder campus. It is open to all who are in recovery or choosing to live a substance-free lifestyle, and to allies who are supportive of the recovery community.

Cultural Unity & Engagement Center

The Cultural Unity & Engagement Center provides support and resources that promote academic, personal, and professional success for all students.  We provide innovative programs and services that address that intersections of our multiple identities with special focus given to underrepresented populations on the University of Colorado at Boulder campus. For more information, visit the their website or their offices in the C4C.

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) offers a variety of services to meet the needs of students and those who might be concerned about students, including staff, faculty, and parents. CAPS provides a broad range of services like individual counseling, workshops, and group therapy.  Please see the CAPS website for details.

CU NightRide

CU NightRide is a student-operated program dedicated to meeting the safety needs of CU students, faculty, and staff by providing night-time transportation to support a safe academic and socially responsible environment both on campus and in the community. CU NightRide is free for CU students, faculty, and staff.

Disability Services

Disability Services works collaboratively with you as you develop independence and self-advocacy, as well as create your network of resources. Their staff members can provide honest and supportive feedback to you throughout your journey at the university.

Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer Resource Center

The Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Queer Resource Center (GLBTQRC) helps gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and allied (GLBTQIA) students, staff, and faculty at the University of Colorado Boulder. They provide:

  • information dissemination and referral;
  • educational, cultural, and social programming;
  • advocacy and voice for the GLBTQIA community at the University of Colorado Boulder.
Office of Victim Assistance

The Office of Victim Assistance offers free confidential information, counseling, advocacy and support to all University of Colorado Boulder students, staff, faculty and their significant others.

Ombuds Office

The Ombud's Office is a confidential, impartial, informal and independent problem-solving and conflict resolution resource for all members of the University community.

Students in Transition (SiT)

Students in Transition (SiT) is the term used to refer to student populations who could benefit from specialized advising and support including: returning adult learners, students who are changing academic direction late in their undergraduate careers, international students, foreign-exchange students, veterans and military students.  

If you fall into this category of students, or if you have a special circumstance that would benefit from additional resources, please see us.  

Veteran Services and Veteran’s Education Benefits

The Veterans Services Office understands that veterans and military members on the CU-Boulder may experience special circumstances as they pursue an education. To that end, the Veterans Services Office can help.  Please visit their website for more details.

Wardenburg Health Center

Wardenburg is the primary health care facility for CU students and it is located conveniently on campus. Their services include primary care, psychological health, sports medicine, women’s health, and peer health education.

Women’s Resource Center

Using gender equity as a framework, The Women's Resource Center  provides educational and community building opportunities, resources, and referrals, and a gathering space for women-identified students and their allies.