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CU's Nobel Prize 2001

October 9 News Release

About the Bose-Einstein Condensate

Carl Wieman Vitae

Eric Cornell Vitae

Photographs

News Conference

Related Links
JILA Bose-Einstein Condensate

CU-Boulder News Services

Physics 2000 Interactive Demo

The Nobel Prize


Contact
Peter Caughey, (303) 492-6431 (CU),
e-mail: caughey@
colorado.edu


Fred McGehan, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (303) 497-7000
e-mail: mcgehan@
boulder.nist.gov



Photographs
Bose-Einstein Condensate: A New Form of Matter

Slides or scans of any of the photographs are available by mail, FedEx, or e-mail. Contact Casey Cass, 303-492-4173, or the Office of News Services, 303-429-6431.

Credit all photos to: University of Colorado at Boulder, Office of News Services.


Eric Cornell, (left, in blue shirt) and Carl Wieman with the apparatus used to achieve the Bose-Einstein condensate. Photo by Ken Abbott/University of Colorado at Boulder (July 1995)

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July, 1995 - The research team achieving the Bose-Einstein condensation consisted of (left to right) Carl Wieman, Mike Matthews, Mike Anderson (standing), Jason Ensher (yellow shirt) and Eric Cornell (in blue shirt). Photo by Ken Abbott/University of Colorado at Boulder.

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Wieman and Cornell atop Macky Auditorium at the University of Colorado at Boulder campus.

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Carl Wieman and Eric Cornell display the data that illustrate their first observation of the Bose-Einstein condensate.

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False-color images display the velocity distribution of the cloud of rubidium atoms at (a) just before the appearance of the Bose-Einstein condensate, (b) just after the appearance of the condensate and (c) after further evaporation left a sample of nearly pure condensate. The field of view of each frame is 200 x 270 micrometers, and corresponds to the distance the atoms have moved in about 1/20 of a second. The color corresponds to the number of atoms at each velocity, with red being the fewest and white being the most. Areas appearing white and light blue indicate lower velocities. Images courtesy of Mike Matthews, JILA research team.

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Eric A. Cornell

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Carl E. Wieman

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