Image: Flow Visualization - A Course in the Physics and Art of Fluid Flow
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2006 Gallery - Team Project 3
For most of the semester, students were put in mixed teams of graduate and undergraduate, photography and engineering. The teams were given access to a range of flow visualization equipment and experiments, and were also encouraged to create their own apparatus. Students worked both as artist plus assistants, and in fully collaborative arrangements.
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Hwapyong Ko

A hybrid rocket engine firing at Mach 3, shot at 200 frames/sec, color reversed.
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Tim Read

Stage fog illuminated by a sheet of laser light forms a suddenly started laminar planar jet at Re = 25.
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Tanner Ladtkow, Geneva Wilkesanders, Tim Read, Andrea Fabri

Stage fog illuminated by a sheet of laser light forms a suddenly started laminar planar jet at Re = 330.
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Chris Skallerud, Molly Selting

Atomization of water droplets.
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Mike Demmons, Andrea Fabri

A low pressure water jet was reversed and mirrored digitally
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James Palmer,Chris Bonilha, Dustin Scaplo, Grant Bovee

An air-propelled 6 mm BB gun was fired underwater. Water in the barrel (at right) was dyed green. A vortex ring of air, seen at the head of the expelled water jet, is due to cavitation.
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Chris Bonilha, Dustin Scaplo, Grant Bovee

An air-propelled 6 mm BB gun was fired underwater. Water in the barrel was dyed red. A vortex ring of air, seen at the head of the expelled water jet, is due to cavitation. The wake of the pellet is marked by a trail of air bubbles, with a cloud of bubbles near the barrel exit.
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Nigel Gorbold, Lok kin Lee, Chris McCray, Taylor Simonson, Melissa Talmage

An innovative racing wetsuit surface design uses recessed dimples. Visualization in a flume shows that these dimples collect air bubbles which may be responsible for the improved performance by reducing drag. Increased bouyancy was negligible.
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Chris Ostoich, Jake Lilevjen, Chris Kuhn, Tyler Harrison, Ryan Mansfield

A vortex ring was visualized using hydrogen bubbles, created at a wire by electrolysis.
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