Image: Flow Visualization - A Course in the Physics and Art of Fluid Flow
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2004 Gallery - Clouds 1
Clouds represent a fabulous form of flow visualization that is available to everybody, almost every day. Clouds can reveal a tremendous amount about the flows and physics of the atmosphere.
Instructions for the cloud assignment: Photograph a cloud. In fact, photograph clouds as often as possible. You will soon discover that it is not easy to do but that it is a very pleasant diversion from everything else that you do. Do keep track of where, when, and how the image was made. A report is required. Seek atmospheric sounding data and discuss the physics revealed. Exceptional images made prior to this course are acceptable; document them as best you can.
The most famous "cloud" photographs were made in black and white by the legendary early twentieth century New York art dealer, photographer, and husband of Georgia O'Keefe, Alfred Steiglitz. He called them "equivalents" and considered them to be music. Sunrise and sunset are sometimes quite colorful or even extraordinary, but difficult to picture in a satisfying way. During the day, individual clouds can be extremely interesting. In the course of this assignment you will discover what the English writer and amateur photographer George Bernard Shaw once said about the photographer: "The photographer is like the cod (fish) who lays a million eggs so that one may hatch." So, keep looking up and keep pressing the button. And, if you have access to an extreme wide angle lens as well as a telephoto lens, use them as needed and as often as possible. Clouds require that you think outside the box.
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Kerstin Lieff

'Cloudmaker'
While driving past this refinery in Commerce City, CO, the artist's son remarked "So NOW I know how they make clouds!"
Sascha Huges-Cayley

Cumulus congestus behind Delicate Arch, UT

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Robin Parsons

Cumulus congestus with pileus, the narrow horizontal cloud, which is formed as the rising air in the cumulus lifts surrounding air to the condensation point.
Eric Larson

Cumulus fractus; ragged cumulus.

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Rick Silva

Cumulus and altocumulus. 9/13/04, 7pm, looking west from Boulder, Table Mesa Park'n'Ride.
Matt Weber

Cumulus congestus, 10/3/04, 4pm, looking NW from Boulder

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Laurel Swift

The trees in the foreground echo the clouds in this image of cumulus and cumulonimbus, with some altocumulus above. 10/3/2004, 3:30 pm, looking east from north Boulder.

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Jennifer Masini

Altocumulus

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Chris Fauble

Altocumulus undulatus, with possible mountain wave. 10/5/04, 12 pm.
Clay Corbett

A variety of clouds from cumulus to cirrostratus appear in a chaotic sky as a cold front approaches.

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Sarah Robinson

Cumulus.
   
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Lindsey Wohlman

Cumulonimbus, 8/14/04, 6pm, near Berthoud, CO.
Aaron Brown

Cumulonimbus mammatus. 10/2004, Boulder CO.

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David Harbaugh

Nimbostratus with pannus/fog, 9/30/04, 10 am, Vail, CO.

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Lauren Courtney

9/4/04, 5am.
   
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Bronwyn Hayworth

Sunrise, 9/19/04, Boulder CO.
Sunrise time lapse video (.mpg 2.4MB)
Sunset time lapse video (.mpg 3MB)
Katina Butler

Stratocumulus, Boulder CO, 9/19/04, 7pm.
Josh Grages

Cumulus, 10/2/04, 7pm Boulder CO.

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Adrien Robert

9/8/04, 6pm.

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