Image: Flow Visualization - A Course in the Physics and Art of Fluid Flow
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2004 Gallery - Get Wet
For their first assignment, students were issued syringes and tubing, and were encouraged to explore household fluid dynamics such as plumes of food coloring, and 'Get Wet.'
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Bronwyn Hayworth

A drop of food coloring touched to the side of a pool of cornstarch causes a viscous/ surface tension instability

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Karl Hausmann

Droplets of food coloring are suspended in pools of vegetable oil, which in turn rest on milk in a martini glass.
David Harbaugh

Negatively buoyant plumes of food coloring in alcohol, viewed from above.

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Aaron Brown

Most images of Lava Lamps focus on the wax motion, but here air bubbles at the top of the lamp are shown.
 
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Rick Silva

Dyed soap bubbles above a thin film of fluid.
Chris Fauble

Dense, falling droplets of food coloring form vortex rings due to the Rayliegh-Taylor instability.
Eric Larson

Dye spreads and diffuses into a thin layer of water.

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Lindsey Wohlman

Dense, falling droplets of food coloring form vortex rings due to the Rayliegh-Taylor instability.
   
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Laurel Swift

Rising and Falling.
Postively and negatively buoyant plumes distorted by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Left: food coloring in water. Green droplet is liquid food coloring in vinegar, red droplet is liquid food coloring in sugar syrup.

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Adrien Robert

Buoyant plume of incense smoke is illuminated by a shaft of sunlight.
Sarah Robinson

An aerated water stream creates bubbles on impact.
Robin Parsons

Negatively buoyant plumes of cream cascade over cold esspresso and ice.
   
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Chris Wilke

Food coloring is added to a bowl of milk, then a few drops of soap are added. The soap reduces the surface tension while combining with the fat in the milk. The process drives a mixing flow, shown at a series of times.
Matt Weber

Dye visualizes turbulent swirling flow: melted ice pops in a toilet.

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Jen Masini

Dye illustrates mixing in a shear thickening fluid, a cornstarch/water solution.

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Sascha Huges-Cayley

Dye (food coloring) diffuses slowly into water in a fish tank.
   
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Joshua Grages

Salt added to champagne acts as nucleation sites, increasing the rate of bubble formation, which appear as streaks.

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Katina Butler

Water jet in air, illuminated by sunlight, at the Dean Trumbow Fountain.