Environmental Design Building
1060 18th Street
ENVD Rm. 1B60
317 UCB
Boulder, CO 80309
(303) 492 8188 | pwr@colorado.edu

3040 - Writing on Business & Society Course Descriptions

The following list is alphabetical, by instructor last name. The course offerings below are for the Fall 2016 semester. Check the current Course Schedule.

WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY, Dr. Kelly Bradbury
Designed for juniors and seniors majoring in business, economics, international studies, and Spanish for the Professions, this course will help you:
  • hone your rhetorical analysis, critical thinking, writing, and speaking skills
  • shape your communication to the audiences, purposes, and issues found within a professional context
  • gain rhetorical tools to accelerate your ability to write in various genres and in settings beyond this class
  • practice working constructively within a community of communicators
The course will be conducted as a workshop in which your own writing and speaking projects serve as core materials. Although there is no formal prerequisite, the work requires that you already have some facility in writing. We will focus on the communication strategies and forms as well as the analysis and argument that drive professional writing. We will also explore sources that are commonly used in conducting business research.
WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY:PROFESSIONAL AND WORKPLACE COMMUNICATION, Eric Klinger, MA
This course examines theories and practices of professional and technical writing in business, academic, and civic settings. Readings, discussion, and assignments introduce students to writing conventions for proposals, memos, reports, cover letters, resumes, and other forms of professional communication. Writing projects are process-oriented with emphasis on planning, drafting and revision. Collaboration, peer review, and presentations are key features of the class. Peer reviews address audience awareness and usability issues. Students work in teams of 2-3 to propose a case study relevant to professional/business ethics, conduct and present research, and write a substantial recommendation report to an organizational client. Effective document design, grammar, and style are themes of the course throughout the semester.
WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY,Danny Long, MA
Designed for juniors and seniors majoring in business, economics, and international studies, this course will help you
  • Hone your rhetorical analysis, critical thinking, writing, and speaking skills
  • Apply your disciplinary expertise to issues in corporate and public policy
  • Shape communication to the audiences, purposes, and issues found within professionaland public contexts
  • Practice working constructively within a community of rhetors
We will conduct the course as a workshop in which your own writing and speaking projects will serve as primary materials. We will focus on the communication strategies and forms as well as the analysisand argument that drive professional writing—that is, on shaping your writing and speaking so that your points are focused, compelling, persuasive, and supported with evidence. We will explore sources that are commonly used in conducting business research. And we will work in a variety of rhetorical modes, from the verbal to the tactile. In other words, discipuli extraordinaria, by the semester’s end you will have increased your rhetorical flexibility such that you will be prepared for any rhetorical situation.
WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY, Dr. Margaret Luebs
Writing on Business and Society fulfills CU’s core upper-division writing requirement for juniors and seniors majoring in business, economics, international studies, or Spanish for the Professions. The course is approved for the Arts and Sciences core curriculum for written communication, and builds on the skills practiced through the first year writing core requirement by applying an advanced understanding of rhetorical concepts to communicate within specialized fields.
WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY, Dr.Sarah Massey-Warren
Writing for business can be among the most creative and stimulating professional challenges you will encounter, all stereotypes to the contrary. Business writing can include writing blogs and editorials, developing branding concepts for new ventures, writing white papers on key issues, preparing a grant proposal for your own venture or for a nonprofit, pitching an elevator proposal, composing a business plan for your new business, concocting a killer cover letter to go with your shine-in-the-dark resume – you get the idea. The stakes are unusually high in business writing – either you write something really really good and land the contract/customer/audience/raise or whatever – or you don’t. And now, post the 2008 Recession, there is yet another high stake – contributing to a culture of Corporate Social Responsibility. This class recognizes and addresses all of these stakes. Designed for juniors and seniors majoring in business, economics, and international studies, the course will help you address your writing:
  • Hone your rhetorical analysis, critical thinking, writing, and speaking skills
  • Gain rhetorical tools to accelerate your ability to produce new genres in settings beyond this class
  • Apply your disciplinary expertise to issues in corporate and public policy, with an emphasis on corporate social responsibility, business ethics, and communication
  • Shape communication to the audiences, purposes, and issues found within a professional context
  • Practice working constructively within a community of communicators
Equally importantly, you will evaluate what Corporate Social Responsibility issues lie in the business world, what acts are really responsible and what is simply “greenwash,” and investigate through research and writing what the issues are and consider where you will fit, and how you will communicate your ideas within the working world. The course will be conducted as a workshop in which your own writing and speaking projects serve as core materials. Although there is no formal prerequisite, the work requires that you already have some facility in writing. We will focus on the communication strategies and forms as well as the analysis, argument, and crafting that drive professional writing—that is, on shaping your writing and speaking so that your point is focused, compelling, persuasive, and supported with evidence. We will also explore sources that are commonly used in conducting business research.
WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY,Paula Wenger, MA
Designed for juniors and seniors majoring in business, economics, and international studies, the course gives you the communication tools to present yourself and your ideas persuasively in a professional setting. We will cover short forms of professional communication as well as a series of oral, written, and visual forms designed to reach multiple audiences with messages drawn from an extended research project. You will:
  • Apply your disciplinary expertise to addressing professional and public issues
  • Shape communication to the audiences and purposes found within professional and public contexts
  • Hone your rhetorical analysis, critical thinking, writing, and speaking skills
  • Identify your own communication strengths and challenges and learn to address them independently
  • Gain rhetorical tools to accelerate your ability to produce new genres in settings beyond the class
  • Practice working constructively within a community of communicators
The course will be conducted as a workshop in which your own writing and speaking projects serve as core materials.
WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY, Christina Eisert, MA
Coming soon.
WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY, Maryanne Fantalis, JD
Because it is designed for juniors and seniors majoring in economics, business, and international studies, this course focuses on developing skills in understanding and creating the kinds of projects you can anticipate in the business world beyond college. Through the device of imagining yourself in a business role of your own choosing—from entrepreneur to financial planner to marketing director and beyond—you will investigate the kinds of writing you would perform in that role and determine the required content of that writing. You will consider the audience for your writing and explore what that audience expects to get out of your writing. You will plan, organize and write (and then revise, edit, and polish your work) in a classroom setting that relies heavily on peer review and workshops. In addition, we will emphasize the importance of presentation skills and graphic design, critical elements of communicating information in today’s business world. Throughout the semester, we will engage in frank discussions about current issues in business, with the goal that you will challenge yourself and your fellow students to examine preexisting ideas and assumptions, expanding your knowledge and your ways of thinking. This course will help you build confidence in yourselves as capable, conscientious writers, thinkers, and individuals, and will help prepare you for the collaborative yet competitive world of business.
WRITING ON BUSINESS AND SOCIETY, Marlene Miyamoto, MA
Designed for juniors and seniors majoring in business, economics, and international studies, the course will help you:
  • Hone your rhetorical analysis, critical thinking, writing, and speaking skills
  • Identify your own communication strengths and challenges and learn to address them independently
  • Gain rhetorical tools to accelerate your ability to produce new genres in settings beyond this class
  • Apply your disciplinary expertise to issues in corporate and public policy
  • Shape communication to the audiences, purposes, and issues found within a professional context
  • Practice working constructively within a community of communicators
  • The course will be conducted as a workshop in which your own writing and speaking projects serve as core materials. Although there is no formal prerequisite, the work requires that you already have some facility in writing. We will focus on the communication strategies and forms as well as the analysis and argument that drive professional writing—that is, on shaping your writing and speaking so that your point is focused, compelling, persuasive, and supported with evidence. We will also explore sources that are commonly used in conducting business research.
WRITING ON BUSINESS & SOCIETY: DEVELOPING A MARKETABLE IDENTITY, Dr. Michael Zizzi
In this course you will learn principles, techniques and strategies that work together to aid your engagement and contribution within business/economic communities of personal relevance, by examining the intersections of business rhetoric, ethical concern, career application, digital media and use, collaboration in problem–solving groups, and civic/community engagement — all of this both in theory and practice. Strong emphasis will be placed on developing a "marketable identity" (including applying for a real opportunity) as a prospective job seeker and contributor in and out of employment contexts.