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[Thursday, April 9, 5:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Exploring Digital Humanities Lecture Series: "Spatial Narrative: The Challenge of Mapping Experience," by Anne Knowles (Professor, Department of Geography, Middlebury College). Sponsored by President's Fund for the Humanities, CHA, Institute for Behavioral Sciences, University Libraries, Graduate School, Institute for Cognitive Science, Departments of English, Computer Science, Philosophy, Linguistics, Art and Art History, Political Science, and Anthropology. For further information, please go to www.colorado.edu/history/dhss or email Vilja Hulden.

[Friday, April 10, 12:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Performance Friday! featuring excerpts from CU Opera's production of L'incoronazione di Poppea, Monteverdi’s drama about sex, crime and realpolitik during the debauched reign of the Roman Emperor Nero, turning conventional morality on its head—virtue is punished and greed rewarded. The score soars but the sensual duet between Nero and his lover—eventually wife—Poppea, Pur ti miro, pur ti godo—meaning, “I gaze at you, I possess you”—is the pièce de résistance. Sung in Italian with English surtitles. This production will be styled after the hit Netflix realpolitik series 'House of Cards,' starring Kevin Spacey. Doors open at 11:30 for free lunch. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Wednesday, April 15, 4:30pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] English Graduate Student Council's Spring Speaker Series, featuring: Katherine Hayles (Professor of Literature and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of English, Duke University; and Distinguished Professor Emerita, UCLA), "Nonconscious Cognition and Material Processes." Abstract: "Veronica Strang, in Fluid Consistencies: Material Relationality in Human Engagements with Water, like many of the 'new materialists,' emphasizes the agential properties of water in relation to human complex systems and ecologies. Strang argues that water has consistent 'properties' that remain much the same across human cultures and times. By contrast, I argue that water (or any other material substance) has an infinite number of 'properties' that reveal themselves through interactions with other entities. Water, for example, may appear very similar across human cultures, but at the same time would appear very differently to a salmon, a heron, a bridge, and a coral reef. To avoid confusion, I call the repertoire of (potentially infinite) characteristics of a substance its physical attributes, and the way these characteristics are revealed through interactions its material characteristics. Materiality, in this view, is inherently relational. Clarifying these matters allows distinctions to be made between entities with cognitive capabilities (which I call actors), and noncognitive entities or physical processes such as glaciers, tornadoes, and woodrot (which I call agents). Both actors and agents have agential powers, but actors have additional capabilities that agents do not." Sponsored by CHA and the 18-and 19th Century Graduate Student Reading Group. For further information, please contact Deven Parker.

[Friday, April 24, 3:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Exploring Digital Humanities Lecture Series: Title TBD by Evan Roberts (Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Minnesota). Sponsored by President's Fund for the Humanities, CHA, Institute for Behavioral Sciences, University Libraries, Graduate School, Institute for Cognitive Science, Departments of English, Computer Science, Philosophy, Linguistics, Art and Art History, Political Science, and Anthropology. For further information, please go to www.colorado.edu/history/dhss or email Vilja Hulden.