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University of Colorado at Boulder Events Calendar


[Sunday, August 11, 4:00-6:00pm, Eaton 1B50]
Think! Talk, featuring world-renowned bioethicist Frances Kamm. "Who Turned the Trolley?" If you're unfamiliar with what has come to be known as "the trolley problem," you can find a brief (and amusing) video here. Sponsored by the Center for Values and Social Policy in the Department of Philosophy. For further information please contact them at 303-492-6132.

September 2013

[Sunday, September 8, 2:00pm, University Theater] The Qi Shu Fang Peking Opera Company Residence Public Performance; Program includes "Ribbon Dance," "Fighting in the Dark," "Art of Face Mask Changing," and Monkey King & Princess Iron Fan." Sponsored by Roser Visiting Artist Endowment and funded in part by the Implementation of Multicultural Perspectives and Approaches in Research and Teaching Awards Program and the Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact the Center for Asian Studies at casevent@colorado.edu or 303-735-5122.

[Monday, September 9, 12:00 pm, Guggenheim 201E] CAS Brown Bag Event: "Very Fun: My Ride Up from eikaiwa to University English Instructor," by Patricia Yarrow, a CU Alumna, who will discuss her experiences as an English teacher in Japan. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Tuesday, September 10, 6:30pm, Visual Arts Complex 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture: Sue Pearson, printmaker. Sue Pearson’s work is an exploration of her native Norfolk Island’s natural and political environments, and her people’s cultural heritage, history, and future aspirations. Sponsored by Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Tuesday, September 17, 6:30pm, Visual Arts Complex 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture: Professor Alicia Arizpe and Miguel Ledezma, Alicia Arizpe studied the Bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in Visual Arts at the National School of Plastic Arts of the UNAM. She is now in the third year of the doctorate in “Image, Art, Culture and Society” of the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos (Autonomous University of the State of Morelos). Professor Arizpe has participated in research groups on “Otherness in the gaze. She has given lectures on image and female identity in the UNAM in Mexico and Spain in the ELISAVA School of design, the University of Barcelona and the University of Tarragona. Presently, she is part of the Group of research Art and Context of the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, that participates in the exploration projects “Prospecting and analysis of the context in the 54 Venice Biennale” and “Post-pintura.” Sponsored by Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Friday, September 20, 12:00-1:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Performance Friday! featuringexcerpts from Theatre and Dance's production of Terrance McNally's Master Class. This award-winning play is based on the legendary series of master classes given by opera diva Maria Callas at Juilliard. Alternately dismayed and impressed by her students, Callas retreats into recollections of her own life and career; from her early ‘ugly duckling’ years, her fierce hatred of her rivals, the unforgiving press, her triumphs at La Scala, her affair with Aristotle Onassis and ultimately she bares the sacrifice taken in the name of art. Doors open at 11:30 for free lunch. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Friday, September 20, 4:00pm, Hale 230] Anthropology Speaker Series. Michael Kanteena expresses his art through contemporary recreations of Pre-Columbian pottery designs. "Pueblo Pottery" will showcase his work in a public presentation. Sponsored by Department of Anthropology. For further information, please email anthro@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, September 24, 6:30pm, Visual Arts Complex 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture: Eric Beltz; hypnotically detailed drawings recast stories and characters from colonial American history in a grayscale psychedelia; exhibited in the Museum of Art and Design in NY, Morgan Lehman Gallery in NY, Texas Contemporary in Houston. Sponsored by Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Thursday, September 26, 5:00pm, Humanities 250] CAS Speaker Series: "The Chinese Crises of 1900: Drought, Insurrection, and Invasion in the Year of the Boxers," by Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History at UC Irvine; Professor Wasserstrom will discuss how the Boxer Crisis of 1900 has been linked to "catastrophes" of different sorts. Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies and the Program for Teaching East Asia. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu or 303-735-5122.

[Friday, September 27, 9:15am-5:30pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] "What is a slave society? An International Conference on the Nature of Slavery as a Global Historical Phenomenon," brings together 17 speakers from across the globe to investigate commonalities and differences in the practice of slavery on a worldwide, trans-historical level. Sponsored by Departments of Anthropology, Classics, and History, as well as the Center for Western Civilization, IMPART, GCAH, the Vice Chancellor’s Research Council, the Dean’s Fund for Excellence, the President’s Fund for the Humanities, the Kayden Award Committee, and the Mediterranean Studies Group. Papers available in advance by contacting Noel Lenski.

[Friday, September 27, 12:00pm, Guggenheim 201E] CAS Brown Bag Series: "(In)Visible Boundaries: the Spatialization of Class in the Uneven Housing Development of Nanjing," by Sarah Tynen, a graduate student in the CU Department of Geography. She will take an ethnographic approach to examining urban redevelopment in order to address the everyday nuances of the uneven geographies of housing development. This research questions the effect of development efforts to simultaneously regulate and deregulate various urban spaces based on social status and household income. Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies. For more information, please contact the Center for Asian Studies at casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122, or visit us at cas.colorado.edu.

[Friday, September 27, 4:00 pm, Hale 230] CAS Speaker Series: "What's in a Claim? Bureaucracy and the Ontology of Land Holdings in South Asia," by Matthew Hull (Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan). Professor Hull is known for his research on colonial and contemporary bureaucracy, documents, and institutions in Pakistan and South Asia. His keynote lecture will address bureaucracy and corporations in South Asia, and he will discuss his new research on corporate sincerity. This keynote lecture will be part of Department of Anthropology's annual interdisciplinary graduate student conference. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies, Department of Anthropology, and Department of Communication. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Saturday, September 28, 10:00am-6:30pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] "What is a slave society? An International Conference on the Nature of Slavery as a Global Historical Phenomenon," brings together 17 speakers from across the globe to investigate commonalities and differences in the practice of slavery on a worldwide, trans-historical level. Sponsored by Departments of Anthropology, Classics, and History, as well as the Center for Western Civilization, IMPART, GCAH, the Vice Chancellor’s Research Council, the Dean’s Fund for Excellence, the President’s Fund for the Humanities, the Kayden Award Committee, and the Mediterranean Studies Group. Papers available in advance by contacting Noel Lenski.

[Monday, September 30, 5:30pm, Hale 270] "A History of Religion in 5 1/2 Objects,"lLecture and presentation by S. Brent Plate, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, Hamilton College. Plate is a noted authority on religion and film, art and aesthetics, religion and visual culture, and material religion; he is author of, among other publications, the books Religion and Film; Blasphemy: Art That Offends; Walter Benjamin, Religion, and Aesthetics; Representing Religion in World Cinema; and Religion, Art, and Visual Culture. He is also editor and co-founder of Material Religion: the Journal of Objects, Art and Belief, as well as co-founder and President of the Society for Comparative Research in Performative and Iconic Texts. This talk, which is drawn from his forthcoming book (Beacon, 2014) of the same title, tells the stories of five types of ordinary objects — stones, crosses, bread, incense, drums — that humans have engaged and put to use in sensual, symbolic, sacred ways, and argues that material connections lie at the heart of religious traditions. Reception to follow. Sponsored by Department of Religious Studies and the Center for Religion, Media, and Culture. For further information, please contact Deborah Whitehead, 303-492-7649.

October 2013

[Friday, October 4, 4:00pm, Hale 230] Anthropology Graduate Student Speaker Series. David Valentine is an anthropologist from the University of Minnesota. He began his career with studies of transgender identities and his most recent work is on conceptions of "deep time" and the "future", doing fieldwork with new space companies and entrepreneurs in California. Sponsored by Department of Anthropology. For further information, please email anthro@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, October 8, 6:30pm, Visual Arts Complex 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture: Jose Ruiz; site-specific, interdisciplinary, collaborative, and interventionist forms of art making; extensive exhibition record both domestic and international; active in curatorial work and critical art writing. Sponsored by Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Tuesday, October 8, 6:30pm, Hale 270] The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network, and Boulder County are proud to introduce FrackingSENSE 2.0. In our first series, we asked our speakers to offer information and expertise on various aspects of Natural Gas development. This time, we have encouraged our speakers to offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future. All our upcoming speakers will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conflicting studies, and appraise contradictory claims. For more information, please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Thursday, October 10, 5:00pm, UMC Art Gallery] "In Love With Our Undoing: Scenes From Puerto Rico's Tragic Imagination." Free lecture by Benigno Trigo (Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Vanderbilt University). Professor Trigo is a specialist in Literary Theory, Psychoanalysis, and modern Spanish American Literature. He has published Remembering Maternal Bodies: Melancholy in Latina and Latin American Women's Writing and Subjects of Crisis: Race and Gender as Disease in Latin America. Sponsored by Department of Spanish and Portuguese. For further information, please contact spanport@colorado.edu, 303-492-7308.

[Friday, October 11, 11:00am, Koelbel 220] CAS Speaker Series: "Chinese and Global Governance: From Rule-Followers to Rule-Makers," by Scott Kennedy, Associate Professor of the Departments of Political Science and East Asian Languages and Cultures at Indiana University. He will address how Chinese government agencies, companies, and NGOs are becoming much more significant players in every area of global governance, from trade remedies to technical standards setting to rules governing transnational investment. He will explain how Chinese are learning, utilizing, and shaping the rules of the game in these and other areas. Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies and Leeds School of Business. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Tuesday, October 14, 4:00pm, Hale 260] "Nabokov's Religious Apostasy: Gnostic Turpitude," a free lecture by Professor Sergej Davydov of Middlebury College. The early writings of the great Russian-American writer Vladimir Nabokov were rife with themes and images from his Russian Orthodox religion. However, from 1925 on, Nabokov began to re-code his Orthodox Christianity into a peculiar "poetic religion" of his own. This talk explores the reasons behind his process and the literary techniques involved. Sponsored by the Comparative Literature Graduate Program. For further information, please contact them at 303-492-7376.

[Tuesday, October 15, 6:30pm, Hale 270] The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network, and Boulder County are proud to introduce FrackingSENSE 2.0. In our first series, we asked our speakers to offer information and expertise on various aspects of Natural Gas development. This time, we have encouraged our speakers to offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future. All our upcoming speakers will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conflicting studies, and appraise contradictory claims. For more information, please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Thursday, October 17, 6:00pm, Glenn Miller Ballroom (UMC)] Christo, an internationally renowned artist, will present a lecture on two works in progress: Over The River, proposed temporary work of art that will suspend 5.9 miles of silvery, luminous fabric panels high above the Arkansas River in south-central Colorado. The Mastaba, a project for Abu Dhabi, will be the largest sculpture in the world, made from 410,000 multi-colored barrels to form a mosaic of bright sparkling colors, echoing Islamic architecture. Previous Christo and Jeanne-Claude projects include: The Gates in NYC's Central Park and the wrapping of the Reichstag in Berlin and the Pont-Neuf bridge in Paris. Sponsored by Center of the American West, ATLAS Institute, Department of Art and Art History, and CU Art Museum. For furthur information go to admin@centerwest.org, or call 303-492-4879.

[Thursday, October 17, 6:00pm, Hale 270] CAS Speaker Series: "Ways of Knowing the Body in Buddhist Tantra and Tibetan Medicine," by Janet Gyasto, Hershey Professor of Buddhist Studies at Harvard University, who will discuss the body in Buddhist Tantra and Tibetan medicine. Traditional Tibetan medicine sometimes found its Buddhist heritage and its urge for empirical knowledge of the body to be at odds, and made unusual efforts to separate itself from religious ways of knowing. At the same time, the line between yogic and sensory observation was not easy to draw. This lecture will explore how the body became the focus of some of the most interesting theoretical reflection, from the dawn of Tibetan Buddhism into the time of the height of the central Tibetan government's powers in the 17th century. Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies in conjunction with Naropa University. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Tuesday, October 22, 6:30pm, Visual Arts Complex 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture: Xavier Toubes, ceramicist; former Artistic Director of European Ceramics Work Centre in s-Hertogenbosch. Toubes has exhibited frequently in the USA, Europe and Asia. Sponsored by Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Tuesday, October 22, 6:30pm, Hale 270] The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network, and Boulder County are proud to introduce FrackingSENSE 2.0. In our first series, we asked our speakers to offer information and expertise on various aspects of Natural Gas development. This time, we have encouraged our speakers to offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future. All our upcoming speakers will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conflicting studies, and appraise contradictory claims. For more information, please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Wednesday, October 23, 3:00pm, Makenna 112] GSLL Department Colloquium, featuring Benjamin Teitelbaum. “I can’t bear to witness”: Women, Sorrow, and the New Sound of Nordic Radical Nationalism." White supremacists, ethnic separatists, and cultural ultraconservatives populate Sweden’s scene of self-identified nationalists. Despite pronounced ideological and social differences among nationalists, most can trace their activism to a cultural movement that engulfed Western Europe during the 1990s: skinheadism. Skinhead style and white power music provided vital fundraising and recruiting channels for radical nationalists in Sweden. But with its hooliganism, male chauvinism, and hate rhetoric, this subculture also repulsed much of the Swedish mainstream, and prevented opponents of immigration from making appreciable political gains. This talk explores activists’ recent efforts to reject skinheadism and refashion themselves as upstanding agents of love and justice. The paper connect this reformist campaign with nationalists’ emerging interest in showcasing traditional femininities in their expressive culture. The analysis centers on the works and reception of Swedish singer Saga—currently the most popular musician in the greater white nationalist world. The paper shows how Saga and similar artists create gendered portrayals of white victimization in their music, portrayals that reinforce (male) nationalists’ images of themselves as defenders of the oppressed. The discussion offers insight into the shifting conceptual terrain of radical nationalism at a time when this movement is achieving unprecedented political gains throughout the Nordic region. Following the presentation, there will be an open discussion on the importance and problems of national symbolism for foreign language and culture departments. Sponsored by Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. For further information, please contact Jan Kaufman.

[Thursday, October 24, 4:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] The Graduate School is pleased to sponsor a talk with discussion by Leonard Cassuto (Professor of English, Fordham University) on the academic job market, with an emphasis in the humanities. "The Academic Job Market: An Ecological Introduction." This talk will be specifically graduate student oriented, but will prove useful to faculty and to all those interested in the humanities. He will start with some concrete, practical advice to job seekers, and use it as a springboard to a larger discussion of the meaning of the job market, and how our understanding of it has to change going forward. Professor Cassuto writes regularly on graduate education issues for the Chronicle of Higher Education and is widely recognized as one of the most important and influential voices in the current debates about that issue. Refreshments served. Sponsored by the Graduate School. For further information, please contact John Stevenson.

[Friday, October 25, 4:00pm, Hale 230] Anthropology Speaker Series. Dr. Goettner-Abendroth is a German philosopher and researcher of culture and society and the founder of modern Matriarchal Studies. She taught at the University of Munich and was a visiting professor at the University of Montreal, Canada, and the University of Innsbruck, Austria. She guided two World Congresses on Matriarchal Studies in 2003 and 2005, and a third large congress on Matriarchal Politics in 2011. This public talk will be followed by a reception. Sponsored by Department of Anthropology. For further information, please email anthro@colorado.edu.

[Monday, October 28, 5:00 pm, Hale 270] CAS Speaker Series: "CHINA Town Hall: Location Connections, National Reflections." CHINA Town Hall is a national day of programming on China involving 60 cities throughout the United States. This year's event will feature a live webcast with Madeleine K. Albright, the 64th U.S. Secretary of State. This will be followed by our on-site speaker, Melinda Herrold-Menzies, Associate Professor of Environmental Analysis at Pitzer College. This event is sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies and the National Committee on United States-China Relations. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Tuesday, October 29, 5:00 pm, Center for Community S350] CAS Speaker Series: "Career Tracks in Asian Studies." The Center for Asian Studies invites you to learn about global career opportunities with a panel of experts in Asia-related fields, including international business, the public sector, and the legal profession. Panelists include Susan Brushaber, attorney; Laura Jackson, Senior Director of Air Service Development & Aviation Research at Denver International Airport; and Sandi Moilanen, International Division Director at the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade. Learn from these current professionals and get advice on how to use your education in a promising global career. A networking reception will follow. All majors welcome. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Tuesday, October 29, 6:30pm, Hale 270] The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network, and Boulder County are proud to introduce FrackingSENSE 2.0. In our first series, we asked our speakers to offer information and expertise on various aspects of Natural Gas development. This time, we have encouraged our speakers to offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future. All our speakers will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conflicting studies, and appraise contradictory claims. For more information, please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

November 2013

[Friday, November 1-Sunday, November 3, VAC Auditorium and HUMN 150] 29th Boulder Conference on the History and Philosophy of Science. "Measurement Across the Sciences." Description: Measurement plays a central role in scientific inquiry. But as science has changed over time, and new scientific disciplines have sprung up, the nature of scientific measurement has become complicated. To what extent do different scientific disciplines have a common understanding of measurement as a tool of inquiry? On the other hand, to what extent has the meaning and purpose of measurement become idiosyncratic to each discipline? And is it necessary for us to have common standards of measurement across disciplines? It is crucial for historians, philosophers, and scientists alike to reflect upon the role that measurement has played, and continues to play, across the sciences. Keynote speakers: Denny Borsboom, Psychology Department, University of Amsterdam; Judah Levine, National Institute of Standards (Time and Frequency Division) & Department of Physics, University of Colorado; Paul Teller, Philosophy Department, UC Davis. The Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science at University of Colorado at Boulder is co-sponsored by the departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, please contact RCHPS@colorado.edu.

[Friday, November 1, 4:00pm, Hale 230] Anthropology Speaker Series. Chad Spitler will share his experience in applying Anthropology to corporations and considers himself a corporate anthropologist. He graduated with an MA in Anthropology from the University of Colorado in 1996. He has worked with Blackrock and Barclays. This public talk will be followed by a reception. Sponsored by Department of Anthropology. For further information, please email anthro@colorado.edu.

[Friday, November 1, 5:00 pm, Eaton Humanities 150] CAS Speaker Series: "The US and Prospects for Democracy in Iran." Professor Milani, director of Iranian Studies at Stanford University, will give a lecture on the prospects for democracy in Iran. He will look first at the history of US-Iran relations. Then he will examine two questions of Iran’s pursuit of democracy and America’s uneven approach to this pursuit. He will argue that Iran stands at the cusp of a cultural and political transformation, and it is only by grasping the essence of these changes that America can formulate a policy that safeguards its own national interests while respecting the pursuit of life, liberty, and democracy for all in Iran. Professor Milani has been invited to CU by the Persian program, and this event is sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies and the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Saturday, November 2, 11:0 am, Norlin 5th floor] American Music Goes to War! - featuring CU’s own Alan Cass, Curator of the Glenn Miller Archive. His “time machine” of pictures, words & music, will transport us back to the era when popular entertainment played the important role of “morale booster,” both on the home front and overseas. Free and open to the public. Reception in the American Music Research Center, Norlin, 3rd Floor, follows program. Presented by the Friends of the Libraries. For further information, please contact Mary Jane Campbell, 303-492-7511, or go to http://ucblibraries.colorado.edu/friends/activities.htm.

[Monday, November 4, 12:00pm, Hale 230] Anthropology Speaker Series. Tanya Smith is an Associate Professor of Human Evolutionary Biology from Harvard University. "Biological Rhythms in Teeth Provide Insight into Our Evolutionary Past," discusses new approaches in tooth growth and chemistry allowing insights into ancient migration patterns and dietary changes. Read more about Dr. Smith's research here. Bring your own lunch. Sponsored by Department of Anthropology. For further information, please email anthro@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, November 4, 6:30pm, Hale 270] Free film screening of BHOPALI, a feature length documentary about the world’s worst industrial disaster, the 1984 Union Carbide gas leak in Bhopal, India, by award-winning director Van Maximilian Carlson. The film features Noam Chomsky, Satinath Sarangi and attorney Rajan Sharma. Followed by Q&A with survivor-activist Sanjay Verma. Co-sponsored by CARTSS, the Forum on Science Ethics and Policy, and the Department of Anthropology at UCB. For further information, please contact anthro@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, November 5, 6:30pm, Visual Arts Complex 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture: Bart Habermiller, sculptor. Habermiller completed his Masters in Sculpture from the Art Institute of Chicago, and is Curator and Manager for the City of Calgary's Civic Art Collection. Sponsored by Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Wednesday, November 5, 6:30pm, Hale 270] The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network, and Boulder County are proud to introduce FrackingSENSE 2.0. In our first series, we asked our speakers to offer information and expertise on various aspects of Natural Gas development. This time, we have encouraged our speakers to offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future. All our speakers will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conflicting studies, and appraise contradictory claims. For more information, please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Monday, November 11, 12:00pm, Guggenheim 201E] CAS Brown Bag, featuring Amy Liu, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science. "Chinese Migration in Europe." In the past twenty years, Eastern Europe has become an increasing popular destination for Chinese migrants. What explains this development? This project identifies several politically-motivated explanations, including citizenship laws, presence of radical right-wing parties, and language policies in education. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please go to cas.colorado.edu/events-list or email casevent@colorado.edu.

[Monday, November 11, 5:00 pm, Hellems 252] CAS Speaker Series: "Japanese Fandom and the Korean Wave: Transforming Japan-Korea Relations, Race, Ethnicity, and Gender through Popular Culture." Tracing the introduction and rise of the Korean Wave through television dramas in Japan and subsequent Japanese drama tourism to Korea, Millie Creighton, Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia, explores how the ‘ethnic erotic economy’ for women within Japan, once emphasizing white Western males, shifted to Korean men, and how the intensive fandom of so-called middle-aged Japanese women challenged age, race, ethnic, and gender hierarchies within Japanese society while giving voice to a category that previously felt unempowered and little listened to or noticed. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies, Korea Foundation, Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies, and President’s Fund for the Humanities. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Tuesday, November 12, 3:30pm, Hellems 269] CHPS Coffee Talk, featuring Graham Oddie. "What is the value of truth?" The Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science (CHPS) is co-sponsored by the departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, please contact RCHPS@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, November 12, 6:30pm, Benson 180] "Words to Stir the Soul: Deeper into the Heart of the Rockies." A book release event honoring the late Denver Post Contributor and Preeminent Western Public Intellectual, Ed Quillen. “My dad had a knack for humor, an encyclopedic knowledge of Colorado history and lore, and he was never scared to say what he thought about anything.” Ed Quillen’s daughter, and the collection editor, Abby Quillen. Readers include: Allen Best, Christopher Braider, Art Goodtimes, Patty Limerick, Ed Marston, Betsy Marston, Laura McCall, Tom Noel, Cohen Pert, Laura Pritchett, Abby Quillen, and Martha Quillen. Sponsored by Center of the American West. For further information, please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Friday, November 15, 6:00pm, Humanities 150] CAS Speaker Series: "New and Old Perspectives on the Sherpas and Mt. Everest." Brot Coburn's The Vast Unknown chronicles the first American ascent of Mt. Everest in 1963. In his presentation at CU, Coburn will contextualize this historic event within the Cold War, discuss many of the unique characters involved in the expedition, and speak to how both climbing on Everest and the mountain itself have dramatically changed over the past fifty years. The presentation will also address how climbing has impacted the Khumbu region and Sherpa communities in significant socio-economic and demographic ways. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Monday, November 18, 5:00-6:30 pm, Eaton Humanities 1B80] The History Department, with funding from GCAH (the Graduate Committee on the Arts and Humanities), presents "Wyatt Earp and the Art of Self-Invention," by Andrew Isenberg, Professor of History at Temple University in Philadelphia. Drew is best known for his pioneering environmental history, The Destruction of the Bison: An Environmental History, 1750-1920, a book that remains the definitive treatment of the subject. He is also the author of Mining California: An Ecological History, and he is the editor of the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Environmental History. Drew's talk is drawn from his new book, Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life (Hill & Wang, 2013). For further information please contact Paul Sutter.

[Tuesday, November 19, 6:30pm, location TBA] Visiting Artist Lecture: James Balog, photographer, filmmaker, mountaineer; Founder of the Extreme Ice Survey (EIS); Featured in the highly acclaimed documentary, Chasing Ice; Published in The New Yorker, National Geographic, Life, and Vanity Fair. Sponsored by Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Tuesday, November 19, 6:30pm, Hale 270] The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network, and Boulder County are proud to introduce FrackingSENSE 2.0. In our first series, we asked our speakers to offer information and expertise on various aspects of Natural Gas development. This time, we have encouraged our speakers to offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future. All our upcoming speakers will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conflicting studies, and appraise contradictory claims. For more information, please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

December 2013

[Tuesday, December 3, 6:30pm, Hale 270] FrackingSENSE Lecture Series. The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network and Boulder County are proud to present FrackingSENSE 2.0. In our first series, we asked our speakers to offer information & expertise on various aspects of Natural Gas development. This time, we have encouraged our speakers to offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future. Our speakers will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conficting studies, and appaise contradictory claims. Robert Martin is the speaker today and is a member of the Makah tribe, and president and owner of Tartoosh Environmental. For more information visit centerwest.org/archives/13422.

[Wednesday, December 4, 12:30pm, University Club 106] The CU Mediterranean Studies Group Presents: "Enemies of the Faith? Jews, Lutherans, and Muslims in Spanish Naples 1492-1648," a work-in-progress presentation by Céline Dauverd (History), with respondents, Brian A. Catlos (Religious Studies), Liora Halperin (History), and David Shneer (Jewish Studies). Please register to receive workshop material. A bag lunch is provided for those who register before Nov. 25; please contact Aaron Stamper to register. Support is provided by Religious Studies, Humanities, The Center for Western Civilization, French and Italian, and other CU Departments and Programs, see www.cumediterranean.info for a full list of sponsors, and further information.

[Thursday, December 5, 3:00-6:00pm, ATLAS 229] PHOTOGRAPHY AND HISTORY Symposium
3:00 “Photography and History” (Patrick Greaney and David Shneer, UC Boulder)
3:30 “Karl Pawek's Post-fascist Family of Man: A Transformed World” (Sarah James, University College London)
5:00 “The Politics of Memory: Criminal Case 40/61: Reverb” (Andrea Geyer, Parsons/The New School)
Sarah James teaches in the History of Art Department at University College London. Her research focuses on relationship between art and photography in the 20th and 21st centuries; the history of photography; art, culture and the Cold War; and Eastern European art. She is the author of Common Ground: German Photographic Cultures Across the Iron Curtain (Yale University Press, 2013) and articles on photography and contemporary art. She also contributes regularly to the magazines Frieze, Photoworks, Art Review and Art Monthly. Andrea Geyer uses both fiction and documentary strategies in her image and text based works. She investigates historically evolved concepts such as national identity, gender and class in the context of the ongoing re-adjustment of cultural meanings and social memories in current politics. Her work has been shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Tate Modern, the Generali Foundation, and documenta12.
Sponsored by Graduate Committee on the Arts and Humanities (GCAH), Jewish Studies Program, Film Studies Program, Women and Gender Studies Program, Department of Art and Art History, Department of English, Department of History, Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, and the Zukunftsfonds der Republik Österreich. Questions? Contact Patrick Greaney.

[Friday, December 6, 3:00-4:30pm, Eaton Humanities 135] CHPS Colloquium, featuring John P. Jackson, Jr, Department of Communication. "The Social Construction of Race: Toward A Rhetorical History.” Abstract: As my starting point I will take what has become an academic cliche: “Race is not a biological category therefore it is a social construction.” This formulation is problematic because it posits that it was only after biology had found no basis for race could we claim that race is a social construct. In this talk I show that the rhetorical strategies for claiming race as a social construct have their origins from within scientific discourses and therefore, even if scientists use “race,” that does not deauthorize attempts to show its contingency. I arrange this history according to the predominant rhetorical strategies employed in particular times. In the first third of the 20th century, those opposing scientific racism employed an argument from ignorance wherein they attempted to shift the burden of proof onto those who would maintain the existence of races and racial differences. In the middle of the 20th century, scientists employed pragmatic definitional strategies to reformulate the “reality” of race. In the last third of the 20th century debates about the reality of race have been plagued by polysemy and equivocation. This history can serve as a cautionary tale for how to approach race in the 21st century. Race has returned to many scientific disciplines but that should not forestall attempts to understand it as a contingent product of our social world. Sponsored by The Committee for the History and Philosophy of Science (CHPS). For further information, please go to www.colorado.edu/philosophy/chps.

[Tuesday, December 10, 6:30pm, Hale 270] FrackingSENSE Lecture Series. The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network and Boulder County are proud to present FrackingSENSE 2.0. In our first series, we asked our speakers to offer information & expertise on various aspects of Natural Gas development. This time, we have encouraged our speakers to offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future. Our speakers will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conficting studies, and appaise contradictory claims. Howard Boigon will be speaking on the topic of "Tradition and Innovation in the Oil and Gas Industry: Reflections and Observations." For more information visit centerwest.org/archives/13422.

January 2014

[Tuesday, January 21, 5:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Visiting Scholars Series: Art/Religion/Materialities, featuring Ruth Phillips (Professor of Art History, Carleton University, Ontario Canada). "Monstrances and Wampums: Jesuits, Iroquois and Materializations of the Spirtitual in 17th-Century America." Professor Phillips holds a Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal Art and Culture. She is former Director of the University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology. She received her PhD from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Her most recent book is Museum Pieces: Toward the Indigenization of Canadian Museums (2011). Sponsored by Student Fees, Department of Art and Art History, with additional support from Mediterranean Studies, Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, and Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, please contact Claire Farago.

[Wednesday, January 22, 3:00-4:00pm, Macky 202] CHA Faculty Fellow Work in Progress, featuring Adam Hosein, Department of Philosophy. "Immigrants and Immigration." Abstract: My project concerns the treatment of immigrants: What rights should immigrants who have already been admitted to the territory receive? Are there constraints on the deportation of unauthorized immigrants? And, how should we select immigrants for admission? I address these important political issues by developing a unified Kantian approach to immigration. In contrast to existing communitarian approaches, I will argue that the state should not be concerned with reflecting or promoting any particular community. Instead, the role of the state is just to secure individual freedom. In this talk, I’ll discuss some of the general outlines of my project and then focus in on questions about unauthorized immigrants. I’ll argue that there is a strong case for allowing many of the 10-12 million present in the United States to transfer to legal status, one grounded in the importance of respecting individual autonomy. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Friday, January 24, 3:00-6:30pm, UMC 245] Children's Literature and Philosophical Wondering, a symposium on Philosophy and Children in honor of Claudia Mills. Presentations by Sara Goering (Philosophy, University of Washington), "Philosophy for Children: Sparking the Love of Wisdom with Children's Literature," and Jana Mohr Lone (Center for Philosophy for Children, University of Washington), "Was the Ugly Duckling Ugly? Philosophical Tendencies in Children's Literature." An interactive session will begin at 5:15. Sponsored by Department of Philosophy with additional funding from GCAH. For further information, please contact Mitzi Lee.

[Monday, January 27, 3:30-5:00pm, Duane G140] CHPS Distinguished Speaker Series, featuring Peter Galison (Joseph Pellegrino University Professor, Director of Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, Harvard University). "Containment: Nuclear Wastelands, Nuclear Wilderness." A pre-event reception will be held at 2:45 in Hellems 269. Sponsored by the Committee for the History and Philosophy of Science, with funding provided by College of Arts and Sciences, Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Communication, Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology, Geological Sciences, History, Philosophy, Mathematics, Physics, University Museum, and CHA. For further information, please contact rchps@colorado.edu.

[Wednesday, January 29, 3:00-4:00pm, Macky 202] CHA Faculty Fellow Work in Progress, featuring Suyoung Son, Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations. "Publishing A Letter of Book Proprietorship in Seventeenth-Century China." Abstract: Letters had been established as one of the distinct literary genres as early as the second century in China, but they became a publishing phenomenon in the seventeenth century. The unprecedented popularity of publishing of letter collections raises the need to reexamine the nature of epistolary genre: why were the writers not satisfied with simply exchanging private letters but sought to publish and publicize them? What kinds of cultural and social expectations distinguished letter publishing from letter writing? By focusing on the letter of a publisher to a fellow publisher in the dispute over book proprietorship, this study demonstrates the ways in which the medium of the letter initially premised on privacy and intimacy between two correspondents was transformed into a social means to protect book proprietorship in the seventeenth century. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

February 2014

[Tuesday, February 4, 5:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Visiting Scholars Series: Art/Religion/Materialities, featuring Jae Emerling (Associate Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, University of North Carolina, Charlotte). "Transmissability: Rethinking Art History, Religion and Materiality with Deleuze." Professor Emerling's most recent book is Photography: History and Theory (2012). Sponsored by Student Fees, Department of Art and Art History, with additional support from Mediterranean Studies, Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, and Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, please contact Claire Farago.

[Thursday, February 6, 5:00pm, HUMN 150] The History Graduate Student Association presents Brett L. Walker (Regents Professor and Michael P. Malone Professor of History, Montana State University-Bozeman), "An Environmental History of Terrorism: 9/11, World Trade Center Dust and the Global Nature of New York's Toxic Bodies." Professor Walker received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2013 for his project, The Slow Dying: Asbestos and the Unmaking of the Modern World. He studies environmental history, the history of human health, and the history of science. His books explore how humans have altered the environment, or have been altered by the environment, across both historical time and geographic space. He investigates how nature, in manifestations ranging from infectious disease to nonhuman animals, has imposed its way onto the human past, as well as how humans have sliced, burned, extracted and engineered their needs and desires onto Earth and its living organisms. Sponsored by Department of History. For further information, please contact Paul Sutter.

[Friday, February 7, 11:00 am, Koelbel S125] CAS Speaker Series: "Corporate Responsibility in the Contemporary Chinese Context," by Robert A. Kapp, president of Robert A. Kapp & Associates, Inc., which provides consulting services to companies and nonprofit organizations seeking to develop successful activities with China or to engage with policy makers in the field of U.S.-China relations. In the non-profit sector, Dr. Kapp chairs the China Committee of the Pacific Council on International Policy. In the field of corporate social responsibility, he was the principal initiator of The US-China Legal Cooperation Fund, which provided more than a million dollars in support of a wide range of Sino-American cooperative legal initiatives between 1998 and 2012. This event is sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies, the Leeds School of Business, and the Colorado China Council. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Friday, February 7, 12:00-1:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Performance Friday! featuring excerpts from Theatre and Dance's production of Quilters, the Musical. This work by Molly Newman and Barbara Damashek, and directed by CU's Lynn Nichols, is a moving celebration of American womanhood originally developed at the Denver Center Theatre Company. It went on to Broadway and a Tony Award nomination. This musical tribute to the spirit of America’s pioneer women tells stories — elicited through quilt blocks — of a mother and her daughters in a rich mosaic, capturing beauty, terror and joy, the harsh challenges and sweet rewards of frontier life. The Department of Dance will also showcase pieces from its upcoming production of Catapult, which reveals the cutting-edge ingenuity of Dance's 2013 BFA class in a collaboration of new and provocative choreography. Sponsored by CHA. Doors open at 11:30 for free lunch. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Friday, February 7, 4:00pm, Hale 230] The 2014 Distinguished Lecture in Cultural Anthropology, featuring Lisa Rofel (Professor of Anthropology, University of California Santa Cruz). "The Transnational Business of Cultural Encounters in China: The Twenty-first Century Silk Road." Professor Rofel is a renowned scholar of China, gender and modernity. She has authored numerous articles and two books. Attending to generationally distinct memories of political and personal history, Rofel is gifted at conveying intimate experiences of modernity and labor. Her most recent book, Desiring China, asks how celebrations of desire intersect with both ideologies of freedom and nationally specific forms of neoliberalism. Abstract: How do people think about social inequality, hierarch and class in China today? Or more precisely, how do people justify social inequality in China today? To what extent and in what ways do they justify the enormous gap between the wealthy and the poor that has arisen after the end of Maoist socialism? And how do people in China today become affectively engaged these recent, striking tansformations? In Anthropology, we have long paid attention to what the discipline calls “origin stories.” This talk offers some origin stories told by people engaged in transnational commodity chains in the fashion industry between Italy and China, which my collaborator Sylvia Yanagisako and I call the twenty-first century silk road. Sponsored by Department of Anthropology. For further information, please contact Carla Jones

[Monday, February 10, 7:30pm, Imig Music Building, Room C199] 2014 Fink Lecture, featuring Stephen Wade. For one night only, 2013 Grammy nominee Stephen Wade will explore through live music-making, projected images, and spoken narrative the stories behind The Beautiful Music All Around Us: Field Recordings and the American Experience. Wade's award-winning book explores thirteen iconic foldsong performances captured on Library of Congress field recordings between 1934 and 1942. In this compellingly narrated, multimedia, musical performance, Wade threads music with its largely unknown yet surprisingly influential creators. A book signing follows the performance. Free and open to everyone. Sponsored by American Music Research Center. For further information, please call 303-735-3645 or email Eric Hansen.

[Tuesday, February 11, 6:15pm, Visual Arts Complex] Visiting Artist Lecture Series and University Libraries cosponsor “The Materiality of Transmutation: What Persists and What Projects,” an exhibition, performance, lecture and panel discussion. Watch how, for Seoul-based artist, Jongku Kim, steel powder becomes calligraphy, becomes a landscape. ucblibraries.colorado.edu/news/KimJongku.pdf. For more information, contact Valerie Albicker, 303-492-2539.

[Tuesday, February 11, 6:30pm, Hale, 270] FrackingSENSE 2.0 Series: The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Network and Boulder County are proud to introduce the Spring edition of FrackingSENSE 2.0. Speakers will offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future, and will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conflicting studies, and appraise contradictory claims. This semester's speakers include Barbara Green, Attorney, Sullivan Green Seavy, LLC, representing mountain counties on water and natural gas issues; Roger Fragua, COTA Holdings, LLC; Josh Joswick, Oil and Gas Accountability Project and former La Plata County Commissioner; Pete Morton, Formerly at The Wilderness Society; Norman Warpinski, Technology Fellow, Pinnacle; and Rebecca Watson, Attorney for Welborn Sullivan Meck & Tooley, P.C., and former Assistant Secretary for Lands and Minerals Management. Spring events. For more information, please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Thursday, February 13, 5:00pm, Eaton HUMN 1B90] Mediterranean Religion and Identity hosts a free screening of the documentary film for Social Change in the Mediterranean, 18 Ius Soli, plus Q&A with director Fred Kuwornu. Sponsored by Mediterranean Studies Group in collaboration with Department of French and Italian. The Spring 2014 CU Mediterranean Studies Group program is sponsored and supported at CU Boulder by the Humanities Program, Religious Studies, the Center for Western Civilization, Art & Art History, French and Italian, History, English, Jewish Studies, Classics, Journalism, CGAH, Spanish and Portuguese, and the Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Additional support is provided by the Mediterranean Seminar, the Institute for Humanities Research and the Center for Mediterranean Studies at the University of California Santa Cruz, and the University of California Office of the President. Information for all events is listed at www.cumediterranean.info.

[Monday, February 17, 4:00pm, Eaton Humanities 250] Public lecture by Courtney Roby (Assistant Professor of Classics, Cornell University), "Seneca's Scientific Fictions: Make-believe in the Natural Questions." In this talk, Professor Roby considers the use of models in the Natural Questions, an encyclopedic work composed by Seneca the Younger around 65 CE. Roby re-examines the prevalent view, in which Seneca's use of models is viewed as an instance of analogy. Roby proposes asking whether Seneca might not have intended his models as something other than analogies. Her approach is to use recent work in the philosophy of science on the inevitable fictionality of models, thereby shifting the focus from "truth" in the semantic sense of attribute-matching to "scientific fiction" which elicits belief through such qualities as enargeia and similitudo. This, Roby suggests, is a more appropriate approach to Seneca's rhetorically and epistemologically sophisticated work. Sponsored by Department of Classics and Center for Western Civilization with support from GCAH (the Graduate Committee on the Arts and Humanities). For further information, please contact Jackie Elliott.

[Tuesday, February 18, 11:00am-12:30pm, UMC 247] Mediterranean Religion and Identity hosts a free seminar with Thomas E. Burman (History, University of Tennessee-Knoxville), "Medieval Christians Reading the Qur'an." This seminar is in collaboration with CHA's Translation Initiative, and is followed by lunch for graduate students. Please register by February 11 with Aaron Stamper. The Spring 2014 CU Mediterranean Studies Group program is sponsored and supported at CU Boulder by the Humanities Program, Religious Studies, the Center for Western Civilization, Art & Art History, French and Italian, History, English, Jewish Studies, Classics, Journalism, CGAH, Spanish and Portuguese, and the Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Additional support is provided by the Mediterranean Seminar, the Institute for Humanities Research and the Center for Mediterranean Studies at the University of California Santa Cruz, and the University of California Office of the President. Information for all events is listed at www.cumediterranean.info.

[Tuesday, February 18, 3:30pm, Hellems 269] CHPS Coffee Talk, featuring J. Cecilia Cardenas-Navia (History of Science and Medicin, Yale University), "American History M: Melanin Supremacy, Black and White Violence, and Spiritual Mastery." Coffee Talks are meetings between faculty and graduate students from different academic departments within CU-Boulder. At each meeting, one researcher presents his or her recent work in progress in an informal, constructive atmosphere that allows the speaker to receive critical feedback from faculty in other fields. In addition, the audience is provided an opportunity to learn about critical research being done in other departments. The Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science (CHPS) is co-sponsored by the departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, please contact RCHPS@colorado.edu.

[Thursday, February 20, 11:00am-12:30pm, UMC 247] Mediterranean Religion and Identity hosts a free seminar with Mark Meyerson (History/Medieval Studies, University of Toronto), "Holy Week Violence in Valencia: Interpreting Christian-Jewish Relations in Late Medieval Spain." Followed by lunch for graduate students. Please register by February 13 with Aaron Stamper. The Spring 2014 CU Mediterranean Studies Group program is sponsored and supported at CU Boulder by the Humanities Program, Religious Studies, the Center for Western Civilization, Art & Art History, French and Italian, History, English, Jewish Studies, Classics, Journalism, CGAH, Spanish and Portuguese, and the Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Additional support is provided by the Mediterranean Seminar, the Institute for Humanities Research and the Center for Mediterranean Studies at the University of California Santa Cruz, and the University of California Office of the President. Information for all events is listed at www.cumediterranean.info.

[Thursday, February 20, 5:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Visiting Scholars Series: Art/Religion/Materialities, featuring Cynthia Hahn (Professor of Medieval Art at Hunter College and The Graduate Center CUNY. ). "Capturing Fragments of the Divine: Histories of the Passion Relics." Professor Hahn's most recent book is Strange Beauty: Issues in the Making and Meaning of Reliquaries from 400 to circa 1204 (2012). Sponsored by Student Fees, Department of Art and Art History, with additional support from Mediterranean Studies, Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, and Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, please contact Claire Farago.

[Thursday, February 20, 7:00-9:00pm, UMC 235] Please join us in welcoming award-winning author Gary Shteyngart (Associate Professor of Creative Writing, Columbia University's School of the Arts) for a public reading of his New York Times bestseller, Little Failure: A Memoir (Random House, January 2014). Shteyngart, who was born in the Soviet Union in 1972 and immigrated to the United States with his family in 1979, is considered to be one of America’s best-known satirists, and has become an eloquent defender of the role of reading and the humanities in contemporary culture. He is the author of three New York Times bestselling novels: The Russian Debutante’s Handbook (Riverhead, 2002), which won the National Jewish Book Award, the Stephen Crane Award for First Fiction, and Book-of-the-Month Club First Fiction Award; Absurdistan (Random House, 2006), which, among other accolades, was named the top ten book of 2006 by The New York Times Book Review; and Super Sad True Love Story (Random House, 2010), which was the first American submission ever to win the United Kingdom’s Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize for Comic Fiction. We are bringing Shtyngart to Colorado in conjunction with the publication of his new memoir, Little Failure. This event will be a conversation with Professor Sasha Senderovich about Shteyngart’s memoir and his work in the past decade, followed by a public reading from Little Failure and an open forum discussion. Little Failure and other books will be available for purchase and signing after the reading. Presented by the Program in Jewish Studies and co-sponsored by Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, Department of English, Center for Humanities and the Arts, Center for Western Civilization, Comparative Literature Graduate Program, President's Fund for the Humanities and the Boulder Jewish Community Center. RSVPs are appreciated: CUJewishStudies@colorado.edu. For further information, please contact Sasha Senderovich.

[Friday, February 21, 12:00-1:30pm, RSVP to CUJewishStudies@colorado.edu for location and readings] Graduate student and faculty workshop and luncheon with renowned author and satirist, Gary Shteyngart (Associate Professor of Creative Writing, Columbia University's School of the Arts). This event will be  moderated by Helmut Muller-Sievers, Director of CHA and Professor of Germanic & Slavic Languages & Literatures whose research touches on questions of science and literature. The afternoon will be an exploration of Shteyngart's essay, "Confessions of a Google Glass Explorer"  from The New Yorker and initial chapters from his New York Times bestseller Super Sad True Love Story (Random House, 2010). Shteyngart's dystopian novel painted a picture of an America dominated by technology, in which parts of citizens' lives were surrendered to and controlled by a gadget called äppärät - a device for social networking and state surveillance alike. In his 2013 essay "Confessions," Shteyngart returned to thinking about the issues of technology, literature, and the human experience first raised by his novel when he won the competition to test out Google Glass - a technology not unlike what Shteyngart had imagined in his fiction. Presented by the Program in Jewish Studies and co-sponsored by Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, Department of English, Center for Humanities and the Arts, Center for Western Civilization, Comparative Literature Graduate Program, President's Fund for the Humanities and the Boulder Jewish Community Center. RSVPs are required: CUJewishStudies@colorado.edu. For further information, please contact Sasha Senderovich.

[Friday, February 21, 2:00-4:00pm, University Club 106] Cultural Translation in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, a symposium featuring Sharon Kinoshita (Literature, University of California Santa Cruz), "Traduttore, Traditore: Translating Marco Polo's Description of the World (aka The Travels);" Thomas E. Burman (History, University of Tennessee-Knoxville), "Qur'anic Commentaries, Medieval-Latin Qur'ans, and Modern Translation Studies;" and John Slater (Spanish and Portuguese, University of California Davis), "Science and the Vernacular in Early Modern Spain." Sponsored by CHA's Translation Initiative and co-sponsored by Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Mediterranean Studies Group, and Jewish Studies Program. To receive pre-circulated readings, please contact Harrison Meadows.

[Friday, February 21, 4:00 pm, Atlas 100] CAS Speaker Series: "Muddying the Waters: Co-Authoring Feminisms Across Scholarship and Activism," by Richa Nagar, Professor of Geography at the University of Minnesota. Nagar will deliver the keynote address for the 20th Annual Critical Geography Conference. She will draw on her forthcoming book, Muddying the Waters, which builds on her ongoing work in Sitapur. She considers the labor and politics of translation across multiple borders that are often difficult to cross. Resisting the romance of border-crossing, Nagar offers an account of how these efforts succeed and fail with far-reaching implications for feminists praxis. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Saturday, February 22, 9:00am-1:00pm, University Club 106] “Teaching across Canons: the Mediterranean and other Comparative Frames,” a one-day symposium, featuring Michela Ardizzoni (French & Italian, CU-Boulder), Thomas E. Burman (History, University of Tennessee-Knoxville), Brian Catlos (Religious Studies, CU-Boulder), James Cordova (Art & Art History, CU-Boulder), Celine Dauverd (History, CU-Boulder), Claire Farago (Art & Art History, CU-Boulder), Valerio Ferme (French & Italian, CU-Boulder), Cynthia Hahn (Art & Art History, Graduate Center, CUNY), Sharon Kinoshita (Literature, UC Santa Cruz), Noel Lenski (Classics, CU-Boulder), Mark Meyerson (History, University of Toronto). Sponsored by Mediterranean Studies Group. Please register in advance with Aaron Stamper.

[Tuesday, February 25, 6:30pm, Hale 270] FrackingSENSE 2.0: The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Network and Boulder County, is proud to host Roger Fragua (COTA Holdings, LLC). This spring's speakers offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future, and will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conflicting studies, and appraise contradictory claims. For more information please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Wednesday, February 26, 3:00-4:00pm, Macky 202] CHA Faculty Fellow Work in Progress, featuring Thomas Andrews, Department of History. "An Animals’ History of the United States." Abstract: This project probes the origins and evolution of the complex and often contradictory ideas, institutions, and practices through which contemporary Americans interact with animals. The ultimate outcome of this research will be a book (under contract with Harvard University Press) that reaches out to a broad audience through a combination of incisive scholarship, probing inquiry, and compelling prose. I will also disseminate my findings through conference presentations, journal articles and public talks. Together this work will show that human-animal relationships have long occupied a central place in the daily lives of America’s diverse peoples. More provocatively, An Animals’ History will argue that we can better understand the course of U.S. history by adopting an animal-focused view of such crucial processes as colonization, industrialization, and consumerism. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Friday, February 28, 5:00pm, Mabel Van Duzee Room (Norlin M424B)] "Orating Romanticism," a symposium featuring: "Schools of Eloquence: British Romantic Lecturers and their Audiences," by Sarah Zimmerman (Professor of English, Fordham University); "Performance and Repetition in the Romantic Lecture," by Sean Franzel (Assistant Professor of German, University of Missouri); "Disintegrated Concepts: Lecture and Coleridge's Method," by Kurtis Hessel (PhD Candidate in English, University of Colorado Boulder). This symposium is sponsored by Department of English, Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, Faculty in Media, Communication and Information, and CHA. For further information, please contact Jeff Cox or Jill heydt-Stevenson.

March 2013

[Tuesday, March 4, 5:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Visiting Scholars Series: Art/Religion/Materialities, featuring Maria Evangelatou (Assistant Professor of Byzantine Art, University of California at Santa Cruz). "Transcending Boundaries: Art and Religious Experience in El Greco's Mediterranean Journey." Professor Evangelatou received her Ph. from the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London. She also holds a degree in Museology and Conservation of Works of Art from the Universita Internationale dell'Arte in Florence. She has published widely on Byzantine art and is currently writing a book on El Greco. Sponsored by Student Fees, Department of Art and Art History, with additional support from Mediterranean Studies, Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, and Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, please contact Claire Farago.

[Wednesday, March 5, 3:00-4:00pm, Macky 202] CHA Faculty Fellow Work in Progress, featuring Catherine Labio, Department of English. "The House of Comics." Abstract: The formal analysis of comics has understandably privileged their two-dimensional elements: the panel, the strip, the page, the gutter. Unfortunately, this approach has not yielded a compelling explanation for the global success of the genre. This project draws on the fundamental insight that a parallel exists between the basic format of the comics page and the façade or cross-section of a typical residential building and that the readability and emotive charge of comics stem in no small measure from their ability to evoke the meme of home. One does not just read a comic book. One nests in it. Moreover, the structure of the comics page betrays a latent memory of architecturally based forms of narrative art such as stained glass windows, frescoes, and polyptychs, which accounts for the readability and rapid formal maturity of comics in the late nineteenth, early twentieth century. The kinship between architecture and comics further explains why architects have turned to comics in their works on paper as well as in their buildings. More broadly, it points to the three-dimensionality of comics and to parallels between the experience of reading a comic and moving in a building. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Wednesday, March 5, 5:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library] CHA's Spring 2014 Cox Family Visiting Scholar: Timothy Hampton (Professor of Comparative Literature and French, Chair of the Department of French, University of California-Berkeley). "An ambassador for myself: Domestic Space and Political Space in Early Modern Drama." Professor Hampton’s research interests include the relationship between literature and politics, the philosophy of history, and the transmission of culture in the Renaissance and early modern periods. He has written widely on literature in its many forms (epic, lyric, dramatic, novelistic) across several languages and national traditions. In addition to his work in French and Comparative Literature, he currently directs the Designated Emphasis in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and the “Diplomacy and Culture” study group. He is currently working on three projects: a study of the history of cheerfulness, a collection of essays about diplomatic performance, and a book on Montaigne. This free lecture is sponsored by CHA and hosted by Department of French and Italian. A reception will follow the talk. For further information, please contact Suzanne Magnanini.

[Thursday, March 6, 5:00pm, Eaton Humanities 250] Free lecture by Alison Keith (Professor of Classics, University of Toronto), "Elegiac Onomastics in the Roman Epigraphic Archive." Why do the names of the Latin love poets' girlfriends overlap with the Greek names of slaves and freedwomen living in Rome at that time? Looking at contemporary inscriptional evidence, Professor Keith will argue that Roman elegy is intimately correlated with Roman imperialism in its celebration of the sexual spoils of military conquest. A reception will follow in Eaton 350. Sponsored by Department of Classics with support from Graduate Committee on the Arts and Humanities (GCAH) and Center for Western Civilization. For further information, please contact Carole Newlands.

[Saturday, March 8, 2:0 pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library] “Lyrical Tales from the Far East.” Author and storyteller Lindy Soon Curry will entertain with engaging Asian folktales, traditional dress, songs and harp music for all ages. Free and open to the public, a light catered reception follows the program. Pay parking available in Lot 380 or the Euclid Autopark. Sponsored by Friends of the CU Libraries. For more information, contact Mary Jane Campbell,303-492-7511.

[Monday, March 10, 5:00pm, Hale 230] CAS Speaker Series: "Curating and Presenting the '3-11' Earthquake Online: Reflections from My Year with Harvard’s Digital Archive of Japan’s 2011 Disasters," by Eric Dinmore, Associate Professor of History at Hampden-Sydney College. He will recount how he assembled and curated online “personal collections” for Harvard’s Digital Archive of Japan’s 2011 Disasters. Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, March 11, 3:30pm, Hellems 269] Coffee Talk, featuring Irene Blair (Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, CU-Boulder). "What evidence is needed to concluded that biased people cause biased outcomes?" Sponsored by The Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science, with support from departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, email rchps@colorado.edu or go to www.colorado.edu/philosophy/chps.

[Tuesday, March 11, 4:00pm, Hale 450] CAS Speaker Series: "High-Growth Hydrosphere: The Sakuma Dam and “Comprehensive Development” Planning in Post-1945 Japan," by Erick Dinmore, Associate Professor of History at Hampden-Sydney College. Dinmore examines early postwar comprehensive development. He traces the genealogy of the 1950 Law on Comprehensive National Land Development, the basic law that refigured Japanese landscapes during the 1950s and early 1960s. The Sakuma Dam, he argues, illustrated the limitations of the comprehensive development approach by primarily benefitting urban industrial centers, by failing to encourage rural revitalization, and by upsetting the natural environment of the Tenryū River Valley. Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Tuesday, March 11, 6:30pm, Hale 270] FrackingSENSE 2.0: The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Network and Boulder County, is proud to host Pete Morton (formerly at The Wilderness Society). This spring's speakers offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future, and will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conflicting studies, and appraise contradictory claims. For more information please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Wednesday, March 12, 3:00-4:00pm, Macky 202] CHA Faculty Fellow Work in Progress, featuring Elias Sacks, Department of Religious Studies. "Hebrew Philosophy Between East and West: Law and Ethics in Modern Jewish Thought." Abstract: Jewish thought is a field whose canonical figures are widely discussed but only partially known. For example, although the Enlightenment philosopher Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786) is frequently described as the founder of modern Jewish thought, his extensive body of Hebrew writings has generally been ignored in favor of his German works. Similarly, although the Galician philosopher Nachman Krochmal (1785-1840) is often cited as the leading Eastern European Jewish thinker of the nineteenth century, his challenging Hebrew writings have rarely been subject to serious scrutiny. My paper will seek to recover these neglected voices, asking what we learn if we explore the Hebrew works of Mendelssohn and Krochmal. The answer, I will suggest, is that attending to such texts both sheds new light on canonical figures, and contributes to broader debates about modernity and religion. Such an exploration reveals that these foundational figures in modern Jewish thought are animated by a shared philosophical project. Mendelssohn and Krochmal seek to present Judaism as a solution to unresolved problems in the history of philosophy—as an answer to questions plaguing influential traditions in ethical theory. Moreover, this exploration contributes to broader conversations in a variety of fields, allowing us to tell a richer story about the emergence of Jewish modernity, and offering resources to ongoing debates about the relationship between belief and practice. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Thursday, March 13, 12:00pm, CAS Conference Room, 1424 Broadway, Boulder] CAS Luncheon Series, featuring Professor Jerry Peterson Departments of Physics and International Affairs). "Kazakhstan Joins the World." Professor Peterson will discuss recent developments in Kazakhstan in global context. When The Republic of Kazakhstan became independent of the Soviet Union at the end of 1991, this vast land had very little connection with the rest of the world. Today, the streets of Almaty, the principal city, are clogged with expensive imported cars. Much of this prosperity has come from the exploitation of Kazakhstan’s vast natural resources, and a strong industry of processing these materials. Kazakhstan ranks 11th in the world in oil reserves, and first in uranium. The political system, a nominal democracy, has evolved more slowly, with the original Communist Party boss of the Kazakh SSR still serving as President. Prosperity seems to have brought harmony, but Kazakhstan sits, largely empty, in an ‘interesting’ part of the world. I will review things in Kazakhstan as I have seen them in my many visits over twenty years as a research collaborator, co-investigator for funded research, and instructor. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies, who will provide lunch for attendees. For a complete list of our events, please visit https://cas.colorado.edu/events-list.

[Tuesday, March 18, 5:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Visiting Scholars Series: Art/Religion/Materialities, featuring Thomas Cummins (Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Pre-Columbian and Colonial Art, Harvard University). "Miraculous Cuzco: The Contentious Nature of Buildings and Paintings created after the Earthquake of 1650." Professor Cummins is currently chair of the Department of the History of Art and Architecture. His most recent book is Beyond the Lettered City: Indigenous Literacies in the Andes (2012), co-authored with Joanne Rappaport. Sponsored by Student Fees, Department of Art and Art History, with additional support from Mediterranean Studies, Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, and Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, please contact Claire Farago.

[Tuesday, March 18, 6:30pm, Hale 270] FrackingSENSE 2.0: The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Network and Boulder County, is proud to host Rebecca Watson (Attorney for Welborn Sullivan Meck & Tooley, P.C., and former Assistant Secretary for Lands and Minerals Management). This spring's speakers offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future, and will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conflicting studies, and appraise contradictory claims. For more information please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Tuesday, March 18, 6:30pm, Visual Art Center 1B20] Visiting Artist: Natalie Jeremijenko (Associate Professor, Visual Art Department, New York University, with affiliated faculty appointments in Computer Science and Environmental Studies). Professor Jeremijenko is an artist and engineer whose background includes studies in biochemistry, physics, neuroscience and precision engineering. Her work primarily explores the interface between society, the environment and technology. Jeremijenko has alternatively described her work as ‘X Design’ (short for experimental design) and herself as a ‘thingker.’ Much of her work reimagines environmentalism as a kind of open-ended game. She likes to frame ecological arguments not in the common conservationist language of interdiction — consume less, reduce your food miles, lose those incandescent bulbs — but rather as overtures to more engaged and imaginative participation. This event is organized by the Department of Art and Art History, with generous support from student activity fees and collaboration with EcoArts Connections, Colorado Ocean Coalition and the ATLAS Institute. For further information, please contact finearts@colorado.edu.

April 2014

[Tuesday, April 1, 6:30pm, Hale 270] FrackingSENSE 2.0: The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Network and Boulder County, is proud to host Norman Warpinski (Technology Fellow, Pinnacle). This spring's speakers offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future, and will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conflicting studies, and appraise contradictory claims. For more information please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Tuesday, April 1, 7:30pm, Old Main Chapel] Think! Talk, featuring David Boonin, "Abortion and Amendment 67." Abstract: This November, Colorado voters will be asked to decide the following question: "Shall there be an amendment to the Colorado constitution protecting pregnant women and unborn children by defining 'person' and 'child' in the Colorado criminal code and the Colorado wrongful death act to include unborn human beings?" It is widely believed by people on both sides of the abortion debate that passage of such "personhood amendments" would amount to a legal prohibition on abortion. If the fetus is a person and abortion kills the fetus, according to this view, then abortion should be illegal. In this talk, Professor Boonin will challenge this widespread view and argue that abortion should remain legal even if the fetus is a person. Sponsored by Center for Values and Social Policy in the Department of Philosophy and funded through The Collins Foundation. For further information, please contact coloradothinktalks@gmail.com.

[Wednesday, April 2, 3:00-4:00pm, Macky 202] CHA Faculty Fellow Work in Progress, featuring David Ciarlo, Department of History. "Selling War: Consumerism, War, and the Roots of Fascism in German Visual Culture, 1910-1920." Abstract: This project looks at those tumultuous decades of German history around the First World War by tracing representations of German-ness, of militarism, and of masculinity in visual culture. Selling War focuses on advertising, commercial imagery, postcards, and other forms of consumer ephemera to show how such images helped lead up to the outbreak of the war, and steered public views of the war thereafter, by “selling” an appealing vision of war to German consumers. Ultimately, I seek to show how an aesthetic of “fascism” – of Germanness as a hardened, militarized, and purified masculinity, emerged first in this commercial imagery of wartime Germany, circulated in the consumer realm. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Friday, April 4, 1:00pm, Center for British and Irish Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] CAS Symposium 2014: Catastrophic Asia. Asia has been the site of some of the greatest human and natural catastrophes. From the 2011 earthquake and nuclear meltdown in Japan, to the 1984 Union Carbide disaster in Bhopal, India, to the legacy of Soviet nuclear testing in Kazakhstan, to the ever-present risk of nuclear war in South Asia, Asian sites reveal much about the intersection of the political and the natural. The Center for Asian Studies will host four presentations by scholars on the risks, costs and effects of different types and contexts of disaster in this day-long symposium. Please join us. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122, or visit cas.colorado.edu/events-list.

[Monday, April 7, 3:30-5:00pm, Hellems 241] The Committee for the History and Philosophy of Science presents Michael Weisberg (UPenn), “Getting Serious About Similarity.” Abstract: Although most philosophical accounts about model/world relations focus on structural mappings such as isomorphism, similarity has long been discussed as an alternative account. Despite its attractions, proponents of the similarity view have not provided detailed accounts of what it means that a model is similar to a real-world target system. I this talk, I will develop a new account of the similarity relation called "weighted feature matching," which is based on the work of Amos Tversky. CHPS is co-sponsored by departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts and Sciences, and CHA. For further information, please email rchps@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, April 8, 4:00pm, Hale 230] CAS Speaker Series: "Learn to Read Japanese in One Hour... and Chinese, Too." In this lecture, T.R. Reid, former President of the Japan America Society of Colorado and longtime correspondent for The Washington Post, explains the concept of ideogram and then moves rapidly through most important kanji used in both Chinese and Japanese writing. Mr. Reid guarantees that those who pay close attention will be able to read Japanese and Chinese by the end of the lesson. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Tuesday, April 8, 5:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Visiting Scholars Series: Art/Religion/Materialities, featuring Helen Hills (Professor of the History of Art, University of York, UK). "The Matter of Miracles: Architecture and the Sacred in Baroque Italy." Professor Hills' most recent book is New Approaches to Naples: The Power of Place, co-edited with Melissa Calaresu (2013). Sponsored by Student Fees, Department of Art and Art History, with additional support from Mediterranean Studies, Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, and Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, please contact Claire Farago.

[Tuesday, April 8, 6:30pm, Visual Arts Center 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture: Olu Oguibe, author, curator, Professor of Painting & African American Studies at University of Connecticut Art and Art History Department; graduated valedictorian at the University of Nigeria in 1986; PhD in art history from the University of London in 1992; exhibited work at the Smithsonian Institution, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Irish Museum of Modern Art, the Havana, Johannesburg and Busan biennial. Sponsored by Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact Valerie Albicker, 303-492-2539.

[Sunday, April 13, 4:30-6:00pm, Old Main] Representative ballads performed at a special concert in collaboration with tomorrow's "Poetry, Violence, and Memory: Corrido, indita, and cuando ballads of New Mexico and Colorado" symposium. Sponsored by the College of Music, Department of Ethnic Studies, University Libraries, and the Graduate Committee for the Arts and Humanities. Contact: Brenda Romero.

[Monday April 14, 4:00-7:00pm, Norlin Library M54] “Poetry, Violence, and Memory: Corrido, indita, and cuando ballads of New Mexico and Colorado.” A symposium and performance with: Enrique Lamadrid, Emeritus, University of New Mexico; Peter Garcia, California State University, Northridge; David Garcia, doctoral candidate, University of Texas, Austin; Brenda M. Romero, University of Colorado Boulder. AND “Nuevo México, ¿hasta cuándo? (“New Mexico, how much longer?”): a traveling kiosk exhibition in the Norlin Library 2nd floor SW through April 14, 2014. Sponsored by the College of Music, Department of Ethnic Studies, University Libraries, and the Graduate Committee for the Arts and Humanities. Contact: Brenda Romero.

[Tuesday April 15, 4:30-6pm, Norlin Library M549] “Re-collecting Ludlow: a panel discussion.” An exploration of the causes and lasting consequences of this watershed event in American history with: Thomas Andrews, Bancroft Prize winning author of Killing for Coal; Ron McMahan, Director of the documentary Out of the Depths, Redux: Coal Mining and Coal Wars in their Own Voices; Dean J. Saitta, Co-Director of the Colorado Coal Field War Archaeological Project. Sponsored by the University Libraries, contact: Deborah Fink.

[Tuesday, April 15, 6:30pm, Hale 270] FrackingSENSE 2.0: The Center of the American West, in conjunction with the AirWaterGas Sustainability Network and Boulder County, is proud to host Josh Joswick (Oil and Gas Accountability Project and former La Plata County Commisioner). This spring's speakers offer evidence-based findings that might lead to recommendations and prescriptions for the future, and will demonstrate how they weigh evidence, evaluate conflicting studies, and appraise contradictory claims. For more information please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Thursday, April 17, 5:30pm, Hale 230] "Conceptual Poetry and the Problem of Emotion," by Marjorie Perloff (Stanford and USC). Professor Perloff is one of the most influential literary critics writing today. She is the author of thirteen books and over 150 essays on modern and contemporary literature in English, French, Russian, and Portuguese. She served as president of the Modern Language Association and of the American Comparative Literature Association, and she is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. She is the Sadie Dernham Patek Professor of Humanities Emerita at Stanford University and the Florence Scott Professor of English Emerita at the University of Southern California. Sponsored by President’s Fund for the Humanities, Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, Department of English, Humanities Program, and Department of Spanish and Portuguese Questions? Contact Patrick Greaney.

[Thursday, April 17, 7:00pm, Hale 270] Public lecture by R. Clifton Spargo, "The Conscience of Literature: The Holocaust, Testimony, and the Work of Historical Fiction." Speaking from his experiences as a critic and fiction writer, Professor Spargo will discuss testimonial writing -- both personal accounts and historical fiction -- as a public act that involves accountability to the self, others, and the past, while exploring how testimony addresses topics ranging from the holocaust to mental illness, from civil rights to gender-based violence, he will connect the work of literature and the act of writing to the work of history. Sponsored by Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures and the President's Fund for the Humanities. For further information, please contact gsll@colorado.edu.

[Friday, April 18, 9:00am-12:00pm, UMC 382-386] CMEMS Symposium: Christian Identity in Late Antiquity, featuring Jason Beduhn (Comparative Cultural Studies, Northern Arizona University), Éric Rebillard (Classics, Cornell University), and Kevin Uhalde (History, Ohio University). Sponsored by Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies and co-sponsored by Mediterranean Studies Group. For further information, please go to cmems.colorado.edu.

[Friday, April 18, 12:00-1:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Performance Friday! featuring clips from a collaborative film by Alex Cox of Film Studies and Chip Persons of Theatre and Dance. BILL, THE GALACTIC HERO is a feature-length science fiction comedy set in the far reaches of our galaxy. It is extremely low budget, and relatively high concept. How is a story of space warfare between two high-technology civilizations to be achieved, doing justice to its original, on a super-low budget? The hour will be shared with Nii Armah Sowah, Director of the Ubuntu African Festival. Doors open at 11:30am for free lunch. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Friday, April 18, 7:00pm, Innisfree Bookstore & Cafe, 1203 13th Street, Boulder] Reading and signing of Beautiful Fools: The Last Affair of Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald by R. Clifton Spargo. Spargo is a blogger for The Huffington Post and is currently the Provost's Visiting Writer in Fiction at the University of Iowa. Sponsored by Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures and the President's Fund for the Humanities. For further information, please contact gsll@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, April 22, 6:00-7:30pm, ATLAS 229] "Origins of the Medieval Spanish Jewish Community: Diaspora Remnants or Berber Tribesmen?" by Thomas F. Glick (History, Boston University). Sponsored by the Jewish Studies Program and co-sponsored by Mediterranean Studies Group. For further information, please contact David Shneer.

[Wednesday, April 23, 12:00-1:30pm, UMC Gallery] "The Medieval Scientific Translation Movement and the Birth of Hebrew Science," by Thomas F. Glick (Professor of History, Boston University). Sponsored by CHA's Translation Initiative and Mediterranean Studies Group. For further information, please contact Harrison Meadows or go to www.cumediterranean.info.

[Wednesday, April 23, 4:00pm, Humanities 1B80] CAS Speaker Series: "Tiananmen Retrospective: Reflections on Violence, Power, and Protest in China and Beyond." A panel discussion in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square protest and June 4th crackdown. Featuring Chris Hammons (Anthropology), Tim Oakes (Geography), Tim Weston (History), and Zhang Ming (Visiting Scholar, Geography). Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Thursday, April 24, 11:00am-12:30pm, ATLAS 229] Mediterranean Religion and Identity hosts a free seminar with Thomas F. Glick (History, Boston University), "On medieval Spanish consensual communities: towns, Jewish and Muslim Quarters, Guilds, Irrigation Communities, and What They Have in Common.” Followed by lunch for graduate students. Please register by April 16 with Aaron Stamper. The Spring 2014 CU Mediterranean Studies Group program is sponsored and supported at CU Boulder by the Humanities Program, Religious Studies, the Center for Western Civilization, Art & Art History, French and Italian, History, English, Jewish Studies, Classics, Journalism, CGAH, Spanish and Portuguese, and the Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Additional support is provided by the Mediterranean Seminar, the Institute for Humanities Research and the Center for Mediterranean Studies at the University of California Santa Cruz, and the University of California Office of the President. Information for all events is listed at www.cumediterranean.info.

[Thursday, April 24, 5:00 pm, Eaton Humanities 180] CAS Speaker Series: "The Body of a Friend: Friendship and Literary Culture in Mid-Tang China," by Anna Shields, Associate Professor of Chinese at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Professor Shields explores the impact of elite male friendship on the literary culture of the mid-Tang period (780s–820s), an era of great social and cultural change and the beginning of the epochal Tang-Song transition. Drawing from her book “One Who Knows Me”: Friendship and Literary Culture in Mid- Tang China, Shields focuses on images of the “body” of the friend in mid-Tang poems, letters, and funerary texts, in particular examining the use of metonymy in representations of absent friends. By invoking friends metonymically—through boxes of letters, gifts of poems, the remembered sound of a voice—mid-Tang writers were able to capture the intimacy and emotional weight of their friendships without conventional sentimentality. Through this and other innovative approaches to portraying friendship, mid-Tang writers forever broadened the scope of experiences appropriate to literary writing and brought private life into greater public view. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

May 2014