University of Colorado at Boulder CU-Boulder Home CU-Boulder Search CU-Boulder A to Z Campus Map

Submit an Event to the Calendar

September | October | November | December
January | February | March | April | May

University of Colorado Boulder Events Calendar

[through December 12, 2014, Benson Earth Sciences Building] “Art + Maps.” Works by four local and regional artists are on display with items from the Map Library collection. The art includes: pen and watercolor works on paper by Michael Theodore, CU-Boulder College of Music, Theory and Composition Department; paintings by Alan Paine Radebaugh, New Mexico painter; quilts by Barbara Olson, Boulder fiber artist; and enhanced remote-sensing images by Karl Mueller, CU-Boulder Geological Sciences Department. Natural forms and earth processes inform the work of these artists. The juxtaposition of art and maps highlights their formal similarities, yet also reveals elements and functions showing where the purposes of the two formats diverge. The corresponding maps range from antique maps to aerial photographs; celestial charts to contemporary expressions of map design. Several attributes particular to maps, such as decorative borders, cartouches, and directional signs are displayed.

September 2014

[Wednesday, September 3, 4:00pm, UMC Gallery] Public lecture by Katina Rogers on “New Models for Humanities Graduate Study and Scholarly Communication.” Dr. Rogers works for the Modern Language Association on initiatives related to scholarly communication, doctoral education reform, and advocacy for fair labor practices. She is the editor of #Alt-Academy. Abstract: The landscape of graduate study in the humanities is changing. Now more than ever, humanities scholars use a wide variety of platforms to collaborate with peers and to share their research with many kinds of audiences. Scholars are embracing an ever-broader range of intellectually stimulating careers in, around, and beyond the academy. At the same time, universities increasingly rely on contingent labor to fill teaching needs, making it increasingly difficult for recent graduates to join the ranks of the faculty. Given all of these changes, how can humanities graduate programs best equip their students not only to excel in their research and teaching, but also for the careers they pursue after completing their studies? Drawing on her work at the Modern Language Association, the Scholarly Communication Institute, and the Scholars’ Lab at the University of Virginia, Katina Rogers will discuss strategies to support professionalization, public scholarship, and career development across a wide array of possible outcomes. Promoted by the Libraries' Digital Humanities Task Force and Scholarly Communication Working Group, and co-sponsored with University Libraries. For further information, please contact Thea Lindquist.

[Thursday, September 4, 5:00 pm, Humanities 250] CAS Speaker Series: "Korea Now," featuring Consul General Dong Man Han, of the Consulate of the Republic of Korea in San Francisco. Consul General Han will discuss the current state of the Korean peninsula, including South Korean economic development, its relationship with North Korea and the United States, and finally, the popularity of Korean culture worldwide. Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Tuesday, September 9, 3:30-5:00pm, Hellems 269] Coffee Talk, featuring Andrew Cowell, Department of French and Italian, and of Linguistics. "Ethical Issues in Responding to Language Endangerment." Bring a mug for coffee or tea. Sponsored by the Committee for the History and Philosophy of Science, and co-sponsored by the departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, go to CHPS Coffee Talks or email rchps@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, September 9, 6:30pm VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Tom Laduke, painter. With an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and BFA from California State University, Fullerton, LaDuke’s paintings are steeped in references to art history, popular culture and cinema. Providing simply starting points - a slippery framework of a beginning. In their veiled appearances, these original images become almost visible – though they might ring the bell of recognition for the viewer, they avoid classification, hovering in the space between cognitive assumption and clear identification, inhabiting the grounds of inferences and suggestions, without providing definitions. Sponsored by the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Friday, September 12, 12:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Performance Friday! featuring Beth Osnes (Associate Professor of Theatre) and performance work being generated through Inside the Greenhouse,using a wide variety of creative mediums to communicate positive solutions to climate change. Doors open at 11:30 for free lunch. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Friday, September 12, 4:00 pm, Hale 230] CAS Speaker Series: "'Preferably Unheard:' Indian Women in Western Media," featuring University of Colorado Colorado Springs and Colorado College faculty participants, Rashna Singh, “‘The mark of the plural’ in American media coverage of Indian women;” Purvi Metha, “Historicizing predominant themes and tropes in media coverage;” and Aditi Mitra, “The social agency of Indian women;” and a student panelist, Krithika Vachali, “Contesting identities as a female Indian college student in the United States.” Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Wednesday, September 17, 3:00-4:30pm, Old Main Chapel] School of the Environment and Sustainability Colloquium Series, featuring Paul Sutter, Associate Professor of History, “The Surprisingly Brief History of Sustainability.” While many of the key concepts that inform what we today call “sustainability” or “sustainable development” have been around for centuries, if not millennia, the widespread use of these terms is remarkably recent. Professor Sutter’s talk will examine both the deeper history of sustainability concepts and the reasons for the “surprisingly brief history” of these terms as keywords in national and international environmental politics. Sponsored by the School of the Environment and Sustainability. For further information, please contact Sharon Collinge.

[Friday, September 19, 3:00 pm, Humanities 370] CAS Speaker Series: "The Basics of Effective Japanese Pedagogy," featuring Professor Yoshikazu Kawaguchi, Professor Emeritus of Japanese at Waseda University, who will address fundamental issues in effective Japanese language teaching, including such aspects as teaching Japanese phonetics, teaching kanji, and engaging students in communication. Professor Kawaguchi is widely published and has offered lectures and workshops world-wide. He is acclaimed for his research on aspects of politeness in Japanese and his contributions to communicative pedagogy, to making students autonomous learners, and to incorporating dramatic activities into language education. This presentation will be held in Japanese. After the lecture, there will be a reception in Humanities 230. Sponsored by the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations and the Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Tuesday, September 23, 6:30pm VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Printmaker Erika Walker's work concerns itself with animal and machine relations: the steer and the plow, the soldier and the gun, sexuality and politics. Invoking the history of these relationships generates meaning about the present, and the stories we tell ourselves about the past shape our self-image today. In this way, history can narrate the manner in which we work for or against one another. Propaganda comprises much of her research focus; old posters, political speeches, and government documents contain language and reference artifacts that have forged the power dynamics of our modern world. Sponsored by the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Wednesday, September 24, time and location TBA] School of the Environment and Sustainability Colloquium Series, featuring Kevin Krizek, Environmental Design. "The END of traffic; the FUTURE of transport; the ROLE of cycling." Sponsored by the School of the Environment and Sustainability. For further information, please contact Sharon Collinge.

[Monday, September 29, Lecture: 2:00pm, Concert: 7:30pm, Imig Music, Chamber Hall (C199)] CAS Speaker Series: "Music, Cultural Heritage, and Syrian Peace Advocacy," featuring Malek Jandali, an American-Syrian composer and pianist who uses his art to highlight the atrocities in the ongoing Syrian conflict, invoke the principles of human rights, and advocate for international aid. His lecture will center on the current conflict situation in Syria and how he makes compositional choices in response to the conflict. Later, he will give a concert on his newest compositions as well as his seminal work “Echoes from Ugarit.” Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies and College of Music. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Monday, September 29, 5:00pm, Eaton Humanities 1B80] Lecture: “LBJ, Al Gore Sr., and the World” by Tony Badger, Mellon Professor of History and Master of Clare College, Cambridge. Professor Badger completed his undergraduate and masters degrees at Cambridge and taught for 20 years at Newcastle University before returning to Cambridge as Paul Mellon Professor in 1992. He is a specialist in post-World War II US Southern political history. His most recent book, FDR: The First Hundred Days, was described by Prime Minister Gordon Brown as “a classic example of how a work of history can illuminate the issues we’re dealing with today.” He was the Andrew Mellon Visiting Professor at Tulane University from January to May 2000. Among his books on modern US history are The New Deal: The Depression Years, 1933-1940 and New Deal/New South. He is currently writing a biography of Albert Gore Sr, father of former vice-president Al Gore. Sponsored by Department of History. Contact: history@colorado.edu or 303-492-6683.

[Tuesday, September 30, 6:30pm VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Sun Hao is one of China’s most recent up and coming brush painters. After graduating from Lumei Art University, he went on to study at Central Academy of Fine Arts Painting Department in Beijing. These studies gave him a solid foundation of traditional ink and brush painting from which he has embraced his own personal style. No longer succumbing to the traditions of revolutionary slogans or theme first, Sun Hao combines his ink with freedom and personal expression as he ponders the material, shape and the harmony of blending the two. His most recent work focuses on meditation and imagination as he gathers strength and courage to express thorough the tension of the ink. Sun Hao will be painting in the lobby of the VAC on either October 1st or 2nd (contact Valerie Albicker for confirmation of date). Sponsored by the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

October 2014

[Wednesday October 1, 3:30pm CU Art Museum, 4:30pm Norlin Library 3rd floor NW, 5:00pm British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library] The preservation and transmission of Buddhist texts from Tibet is the focus of a series of free and open-to-the-public events and exhibits beginning Wed Oct 1 on the CU-Boulder campus, in conjunction with the Tsadra Foundation's conference on "Translation and Transmission" in Keystone, Colorado on Oct 2-5, 2014. At 5 p.m. on Wed Oct 1 on the 5th floor of Norlin Library, Andrew Quintman of Yale University will present "The Making of Milarepa: Reading and Writing the Life of Tibet's Great Saint." Prior to the lecture, a reception hosted by the CU Art Museum in its lobby at 3:30 p.m. opens a special exhibit of paintings by the Lhasa artist Gade on the theme of "pecha" or traditional Tibetan texts. Also prior to the lecture, starting at 4:30 p.m. on the Norlin Library third floor northwest, tours will be available of the multi-media exhibit, "Opening the Tibetan Treasury of Knowledge: Textual Transmission and Cultural Preservation." The display includes woodblock carvings of The Treasury of Knowledge, which is among texts gifted by the Tsadra Foundation to the CU-Boulder Libraries. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies, Department of Religious Studies, University Libraries, and CU Art Museum. More information at http://cas.colorado.edu/events/making-milarepa-reading-and-writing-life-tibets-great-saint or contact Megan Welsh, 303-492-5136.

[Wednesday, October 1, 5:00 p.m., British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] CAS Speaker Series: "The Making of Milarepa: Reading and Writing the Life of Tibet's Great Saint," by Andrew Quintman of Yale University. He will explore the extraordinary life story of Yogin Milarepa composed by Madman Tsangnyön Heruka, tracing its historical formation, changing narrative voices, and enduring legacy across the region, as this story inspired new forms of religious literature across the Himalayan world, new styles of artistic production, and new traditions of spiritual practice. In time, the Madman’s version of the Yogin’s life would become Tibet’s most famous book. Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Thursday, October 2, 12:00 noon, Hale 450] Anthropology Brown Bag, "Reducing Elephant Ivory and Rhino Trade in China: News from the Front Lines." To mitigate the threats global wildlife trade has on biodiversity loss, a comprehensive approach is needed to address every link on the trade chain, from poaching to trafficking to demand. Highlighting the successes and challenges of campaigns to reduce the trade in endangered species in China, the presentation argues for behavior change communication strategies to reduce both the supply of and the demand for wildlife parts and products. To reduce supply required strengthened international and national laws and policies. To reduce demand needs public outreach campaigns to increase consumer knowledge, shift attitudes and change behavior. Grace Ge Gabriel, Asia Regional Director, International Fund for Animal Welfare, has been leading wildlife conservation and animal welfare campaigns for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (www.IFAW.org) in China since 1997. Under her leadership, IFAW's campaigns to reduce commercial exploitation of wildlife have resulted in enhanced policies to make marketplaces unavailable for wildlife trade, increased law enforcement against wildlife crime, and changed consumer attitudes and behavior to reject parts and products from endangered wildlife. A native of China, Grace received degrees in Communications and worked in media outlets both in China and the USA. Sponsored by Department of Anthropology. For further information, go to http://anthropology.colorado.edu/

[Thursday, October 2, 7:30pm, Visual Arts Complex (VAC) Auditorium, and Friday, October 3, 6:00pm and 7:30pm, Muenzinger Auditorium] CAS Speaker Series: "Korean Film Series," Screenings of two Korean films and a public lecture. Oldboy (2003) will be shown on Thursday, October 2 at 7:30 p.m. in the Visual Arts Complex (VAC) Auditorium. The Host (2006) will be shown on Friday, October 3 at 7:30 p.m. in Muenzinger Auditorium. The Host will be preceded by a public lecture, “The Politics of Transnational Korean Genre Films: Park Chan-wook's Oldboy and Bong Joon-Ho's The Host,” by Hye Seung Chung and Scott Diffrient, Communication Studies at Colorado State University, on Friday, October 3, 6:00 p.m., Muenzinger Auditorium. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies and the International Film Series. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Friday, October 3, 12:00 noon, Hale 450] Anthropology Brown Bag, "The Village Was Buried by an Erupting Volcano." Frida Larios is a Salvadorean humanist, artist, and typographic designer who created a set of "pictoglyphs" (pictograms + hieroglyphs) based on the Maya script, as part of her master thesis in London. Larios's reinterpretation of the Maya logographs has caused national controversy because they were commissioned by the former Secretary of Culture of the Presidency, to be painted on the exterior of the Joya de Ceren World Heritage Site museum. Many don't think her work is a true interpretation of authentic Maya hieroglyphs and is a profanity to scientific knowledge, rather than to help communicate her message of the Joya de Ceren narrative. She will guide you through her creation process, the controversy, and open the floor for discussion. Sponsored by Department of Anthropology. Further information: http://anthropology.colorado.edu/

[Wednesday, October 8, time and location TBA] School of the Environment and Sustainability Colloquium Series, featuring Suzanne Anderson, Geography and INSTAAR. "The Surprisingly Deep History of Boulder's Iconic Landscape." Sponsored by the School of the Environment and Sustainability. For further information, please contact Sharon Collinge.

[Thursday, October 9, 5:00pm, Hale 270] CAS Event: "Career Tracks in Asian Studies." Open to all majors, Career Tracks in Asian Studies will introduce you to professionals with Asian expertise who work in international business and in organizations that build local connections with Asia. Come learn how you can apply your Asian interests in a global career! This semester’s panel features Jeffrey King, International Business Manager for the Asia-Pacific Region for the Colorado International Trade Office; Pam Reichert, Vice President of the Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation; and Julie Segraves, Executive Director of the Asian Art Coordinating Council. A networking reception will follow. Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Thursday, October 9, 6:30pm, Eaton Humanities 150] "Our National Parks: Lessons in Courage, Diversity, Justice and Environmental Quality," by former National Park Service Director Robert Stanton, giving the 2014 Randy Jones Lecture in celebration of the centennial of Rocky Mountain National Park. Robert G. Stanton, former Senior Advisor to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C., and former Director of the National Park Service, is a Visiting University Lecturer and Private Consultant in national park administration, natural and cultural resource management and diversity in employment and public programs. The Randy Jones Memorial Lecture Series was created by CU-Boulder's Center of the American West, in collaboration with Rocky Mountain National Park, as a tribute to former National Park Service Deputy Director Randy Jones. Jones served as superintendent of Rocky Mountain National Park from 1995 to 2002. For further information, please contact Jessica at 303-492-4879 or click here.

[Friday, October 10, 1:00-6:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] "History of Knowledge" International Workshop. The departments of Germanic and Slavic Languages & Literatures and French & Italian, in collaboration with the Center “History of Knowledge” at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, announce the first international workshop on the history of knowledge. This workshop brings together international scholars from various academic backgrounds to discuss shared methodological problems associated with the interdisciplinary study of the history of knowledge. Organized by Arne Hoecker (Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures) and Kieran Murphy (French and Italian), with Kijan Espahangizi (Zentrum Geschichte des Wissens/Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich/Universitat Zurich). For further information, please contact Arne Hoecker.

[Friday, October 10, 5:00pm, Humanities 250] CAS Speaker Series: "Japan and the Culture of the Four Seasons: Nature, Literature, and the Arts," by Haruo Shirane, Shincho Professor of Japanese Literature and Culture at Columbia University. Elegant, courtly representations of nature and seasons fill a wide range of Japanese genres and media—from poetry and prose fiction to screen paintings, tea ceremony, flower arrangement, and annual observances. Shirane shows how, when, and why this occurred and the manner in which it intersected with a non-aristocratic representations of farm villages and rural landscape to create the complex cultural landscape we have today in Japan. Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies and the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Friday, October 10, 6:00-7:30pm, Duane Physics G125] Boulder Conference on the History and Philosophy of Science: "Neurons, Mechanisms and the Mind." Keynote address by William Bechtel (University of California, San Diego), "Networks and Dynamics: 21st Century Neuroscience." Abstract: By identifying brain regions and cognitive activities in which they are involved, 20th century neuroscience provided a foundation, but only a foundation, for a mechanistic understanding of the brain. A far harder task, as anyone who has taken something apart knows, is putting it back together. This requires understanding the organization of the mechanism and ultimately how the operations of the parts are orchestrated by dynamic processes within the mechanism as it engages in activities in its environment (which is itself changing). This talk will focus on how 21st century neuroscience is pursuing research strategies aimed at figuring out the network organization and the dynamic behavior of the brain. Reception from 7:30-9:30 in Gamow Tower. Sponsored by The Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science and co-sponsored by Departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts & Sciences, and CHA. For more information, please contact rchps@colorado.edu.

[Saturday, October 11, 9:00am-2:00pm, McKenna 112] "History of Knowledge" International Workshop. The departments of Germanic and Slavic Languages & Literatures and French & Italian, in collaboration with the Center “History of Knowledge” at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, announce the first international workshop on the history of knowledge. This workshop brings together international scholars from various academic backgrounds to discuss shared methodological problems associated with the interdisciplinary study of the history of knowledge. Organized by Arne Hoecker (Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures) and Kieran Murphy (French and Italian), with Kijan Espahangizi (Zentrum Geschichte des Wissens/Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich/Universitat Zurich). For further information, please contact Arne Hoecker.

[Saturday, October 11, 9:00am-6:30pm, Duane Physics G131] Boulder Conference on the History and Philosophy of Science: "Neurons, Mechanisms and the Mind." Keynote address at 5:00 by Carrie Figdor (University of Iowa), "On the Proper Domain of Psychological Predicates." Abstract: Do neurons prefer? Do plants decide? Do bacteria communicate linguistically? Such questions arise because biologists regularly use psychological predicates to describe the capacities of these and other entities. Because these uses appear in serious scientific contexts, they force us to question the assumption that human manifestations of psychological capacities establish the norm for their possession. I think this assumption is false, and that these non-standard ascriptions are literal. If I am right, biology can contribute to our understanding of the nature of psychological capacities, and neuroscientists seeking to identify levels of brain structure and function between cellular operations and organism behavior are free to construct mesoscale theories and models as they see fit. Sponsored by The Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science and co-sponsored by Departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts & Sciences, and CHA. For more information, please contact rchps@colorado.edu.

[Sunday, October 12, 9:00am-1:00pm, McKenna 112] "History of Knowledge" International Workshop. The departments of Germanic and Slavic Languages & Literatures and French & Italian, in collaboration with the Center “History of Knowledge” at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, announce the first international workshop on the history of knowledge. This workshop brings together international scholars from various academic backgrounds to discuss shared methodological problems associated with the interdisciplinary study of the history of knowledge. Organized by Arne Hoecker (Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures) and Kieran Murphy (French and Italian), with Kijan Espahangizi (Zentrum Geschichte des Wissens/Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich/Universitat Zurich). For further information, please contact Arne Hoecker.

[Sunday, October 12, 9:00am-5:30pm, Duane Physics G125] Boulder Conference on the History and Philosophy of Science: "Neurons, Mechanisms and the Mind." Keynote address at 4:00 by Tor Wager (Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, CU-Boulder). Topic: Role of verbal reports in studies on emotion and pain. Sponsored by The Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science and co-sponsored by Departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts & Sciences, and CHA. For more information, please contact rchps@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, October 14, 5:00pm, Eaton Humanities 250] "The Hong Kong Protest Movement: A Forum Discussion." Join the Center for Asian Studies as we hold a discussion about the recent protests in Hong Kong. Panelists will offer an analysis of the protests, including the historical background of the protests, the contemporary context of the protests, and present-day Hong Kong and Chinese relations. Panelists include Tim Oakes, Professor of Geography and Director of the Center for Asian Studies; Timothy Weston, Associate Professor of History and Associate Director of the Center for Asian Studies; and Yang Yang, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Geography.

[Tuesday, October 14, 6:30pm VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Natalija Vujosevic is an ArtsLink Fellow from Montenegro who will be living and working with our department for six weeks (October 9–November 11). Natallija’s work combines installation, video, drawing and performance to explore the archeology of identity produced in a particular social, technological and ideological environment. Collaboration is an important component of her process. She often bridges artists, composers, sound designers and engineers to create her work which combines objects from everyday life with animate elements and sound creating an atmosphere of frozen time that is connected to emotional memories. Sponsored by the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Thursday, October 16, 5:00pm, Eaton Humanities 150] The 26th Athearn Lecture: "We Are All Citizens of Plutopia: The Militarization of the American and Soviet Landscapes" Dr. Kate Brown, Professor of History at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Reception in HUMN 170 following the lecture. Dr. Brown is the author of A Biography of No Place: From Ethnic Borderland to Soviet Heartland (Harvard 2004) which won a handful of prizes including the American Historical Association's George Louis Beer Prize for the Best Book in International European History. Brown's Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters appeared in 2013 with Oxford University Press. Plutopia won the the 2014 George Perkins Marsh Prize from the American Society for Environmental History (ASEH) and the 2014 Ellis W. Hawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians (OAH). To read more about Kate Brown's new book Plutopia, see www.plutopia.net. She is a 2009 Guggenheim Fellow, and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, the National Council for East European and Eurasian Research, the International Research and Exchange Board, the Eurasia Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, Harvard University's Davis Center, UMBC's Dresher Center and the Kennan Institute in Washington. Sponsored by Department of History. Contact: 303-492-6683 or history@colorado.edu.

[Thursday, October 16, 5:00 pm, Humanities 250] CAS Speaker Series: "CHINA Town Hall: Local Connections, National Reflections." CHINA Town Hall is a national day of programming on China involving about 70 cities throughout the United States. This year's national webcast features President Jimmy Carter. After the webcast program, Lionel Jensen, Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Notre Dame, will be our on-site speaker. Sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies, in conjunction with the National Committee on US-China Relations and the Carter Center. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Friday, October 17, 12:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Performance Friday! featuring Nicolò Spera, Assistant Professor of Classical Guitar. Professor Spera will perform "German Poetry: Johann Sebastian Bach's Cello Suites n. 5&6, on the Ten-String Guitar." Dreams forever gone or never fulfilled: this is the ethereal substance of poetry in music. Already in Bach’s days, the lute was a nostalgic emblem, a gentle memory of olden times. Inspired, perhaps, by a sound almost forsaken, nearly extinguished, Bach wrote the lute’s swan song: pure poetry. In his first composition for this noble instrument, Bach transformed his Fifth Cello Suite into the First Lute Suite. Since then, others have followed Bach’s practice, producing renditions of the cello suites for the Baroque lute, as well as the six-string guitar. But no one has yet adapted and performed these suites for a guitar with ten strings! Doors open at 11:30 for free lunch. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, October 21, 6:30pm VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Judith Leemann is an artist, educator, and writer living in Boston. She teaches at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and serves as artist in residence at the Design Studio for Social Intervention. Sponsored by the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Thursday, October 23-25, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library) and ATLAS 100] "Medieval Materiality: A Conference on the Life and Afterlife of Things." 2nd annual James Field Willard lecturer: Caroline Walker Bynum (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton; Columbia University). Plenary speakers: Jessica Brantley (Yale), Aden Kumler (University of Chicago), and Daniel Lord Small (Harvard). Register here. Sponsored by Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, with support from English Language Notes, President's Fund for the Humanities, GCAH, Center for Western Civilization, and A&S Fund for Excellence. Please go to conference link above for complete details.

[Friday, October 24, 3:30pm, GUGG 205] The Center for Asian Studies joins with the Department of Geography to bring you an event as part of the Geography Colloquium Series. Professor Emily Yeh of the Department of Geography will give a presentation on her recent book, Taming Tibet: Landscape Transformation and the Gift of Chinese Development. To find out more about this event, please click on the title. We hope to see you there. The violent protests in Lhasa in 2008 against Chinese rule were met by disbelief and anger on the part of Chinese citizens and state authorities, perplexed by Tibetans’ apparent ingratitude for the generous provision of development. In Taming Tibet, Emily T. Yeh examines how Chinese development projects in Tibet served to consolidate state space and power. Arguing that development is in this context a form of “indebtedness engineering,” Yeh depicts development as a hegemonic project that simultaneously recruits Tibetans to participate in their own marginalization while entrapping them in gratitude to the Chinese state. Exploring the complexity of the Tibetan response to—and negotiations with—development, Taming Tibet focuses on three key aspects of China’s modernization: agrarian change, Chinese migration, and urbanization. Yeh presents a wealth of ethnographic data and suggests fresh approaches that illuminate the Tibet Question." For a complete list of our events, please visit cas.colorado.edu/events-list.

[Monday, October 27, 9:00-10:00am, MKNA 103] "Almada Negreiros, Artist and Geometer," a presentation by Pedro Freitas (Professor of Mathematical Physics, University of Lisbon). Sponsored by Department of Spanish and Portuguese with support from GCAH and CHA. For further information, please contact Tania Martuscelli.

[Monday, October 27, 4:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Guest speaker Diana Maltz (Professor of English, Southern Oregon University) offers advice on Broadview Editions. Since the mid-1990s, Broadview Editions have profoundly enhanced the way we teach literature at the university level. They differ from Penguin Classics and Oxford World Classics paperbacks through their inclusion of social and historical appendices at the end of the primary text. These appendices illuminate cultural issues and debates from the time period of the novel, and range from religious tracts to medical treatises to parliamentary reports. This lecture, hosted by Assistant Professor Emily Harrington, walks the audience through the process of creating a Broadview Edition, from the initial book proposal to the final stages of production. In her edition of A Child of the Jago, Maltz addresses her choice to include non-canonical accounts of slum life in London in the 1890s and considers the way the appendices and notes will shape the way contemporary audiences read the novel. Sponsored by Department of English, with support from GCAH. For further information, please go here or contact Emily Harrington.

[Tuesday, October 28, 4:00-5:30pm, HUMN 145] "Oficina de Teatro de Almada Negreiros," a theatre workshop (in Portuguese) with Silvia L. Costa (Univ. Nova de Lisboa). Sponsored by Department of Spanish and Portuguese with support from GCAH and CHA. For further information, please contact Tania Martuscelli.

[Tuesday, October 28, 6:30pm VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Diane Burko, photographer. Monumental geological phenomenon of the world have captured Diane's attention throughout her career. Since 2006 her artistic practice has been located at the intersection of Art and Science and has been used as a tool for social change and environmental policy, bringing attention to the urgent issues of climate change. This past year she participated in expeditions to Antarctica and the Arctic Circle, which profoundly augmented her ongoing study of ice as an indicator of environmental change. Sponsored by the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

November 2014

[Tuesday, November 4, 6:30pm VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: An LA native working in NYC, Sanford Biggers creates artworks that integrate film, video, installation, sculpture, drawing, original music and performance. He intentionally complicates issues such as hip hop, Buddhism, politics, identity and art history in order to offer new perspectives and associations for established symbols. Through a multi-disciplinary formal process and a syncretic creative approach he makes works that are as aesthetically pleasing as they are conceptual. Biggers is an Assistant Professor at Columbia University's Visual Arts program and a board member of Sculpture Center, Soho House and the CUE Foundation. Sponsored by the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Thursday, November 6, 4:30pm, Norlin Library N424B] The 18th and 19th Century Reading Group presents a public lecture by Dahlia Porter (Assistant Professor of English, University of North Texas), "How to Get Out of Your Self: Detached Organs and Poetic Dissection." Dr. Porter will talk about her research on eighteenth-century surgeon John Hunter's anatomical catalogues, his surgical museum, and "medical aesthetics." Light refreshments will be provided. Sponsored by Department of English and CHA. For further information, please contact Deven Parker.

[Friday, November 7, 4:00pm, Hale 230] Public lecture by Webb Keane (George Herbert Mead Collegiate Professor of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), "Rotting Bodies: The Clash of Stances toward Materiality and its Ethical Affordances." Abstract: Any community supposedly identified with a “single” kind of Christianity is likely to contain conflicts and divisions due to the different logics and temporalities associated, respectively, with ecclesiastical institutions, popular practices, and scriptural texts. These conflicts may extend even to basic ontological assumptions. This paper looks at clashes concerning popular practices surrounding relics and icons in Eastern Orthodoxy. It asks what are the ethical stakes when people insist on the powers of material things even in the face of withering criticism and contempt from inside and outside their church. That criticism, which can have both theological and atheist bases, often focuses on the allegedly instrumental reasoning and selfish motives of people who expect to receive divine intervention from objects such as relics and icons. I argue that popular practices that focus on the agency of objects may above all be responding to material properties as ethical affordances. These affordances provide ways of treating the world as ethically saturated. In the Eastern Orthodox context, this may be one way for ordinary villagers to take lofty theological claims about the divine nature of humans in concrete terms. Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology. A reception will follow the lecture. For further information, please contact Carla Jones.

[Monday, November 10, 6:00pm, British Studies (5th Floor of Norlin Library)] The 2014 Lester Lecture, featuring David Nirenberg (Department of History and the Committee on Social Thought, University of Chicago). "Sibling Rivalries, Scriptural Communities: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam." Sponsored by Department of Religious Studies in collaboration with the CU Mediterranean Studies Group and the Program in Jewish Studies. A reception will be held before the lecture at 5:30pm. Professor Nirenberg will also lead a mid-day lunch/seminar for graduate students. For further information and to register for the seminar, contact Tyson Martínez. The Lester Lecture Series is made possible by the generous support of the Lester Family. This year's lecture is dedicated to the memory of Prof. Robert. C. Lester, Professor Emeritus, Religious Studies, CU Boulder (1933-2013). Details at http://rlst.colorado.edu/lester-lecture.

[Tuesday, November 11, 3:30-5:00pm, Hellems 269] Coffee Talk, featuring Robert Knight, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. "The human microbiome: concepts, technologies, and inferences." Bring a mug for coffee or tea. Sponsored by the Committee for the History and Philosophy of Science, and co-sponsored by the departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, go to CHPS Coffee Talks or email rchps@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, November 11, 5:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Public lecture by Robin Robertson, poet. "Sailing the Forest." Robertson is the author of several collections of poetry. His debut collection, A Painted Field (1997), won the Forward Prize for Best First Collection, the Aldeburgh Poetry Festival Prize, and the Saltire Scottish First Book of the Year Award, and was one of the Sunday Times Books of the Year. Critic and author Kazuo Ishiguro praised its “darkly chiselled poems haunted by mortality and the fragility of life’s pleasures.” After his second collection, Slow Air, Robertson received the E.M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His third book, Swithering (2006), won the Forward Prize for Best Poetry Collection of the Year. His fourth book of poems, The Wrecking Light (2010), includes “At Roane Head,” which was awarded the Forward Prize for Best Single Poem. Robertson is the first poet to have won all three categories in the Forward Prize. Describing the poet’s task, Robertson tells of the desire to reveal “the refreshed world and, through a language thick with sound and connotation and metaphor, make some sense: some new connection between what is seen and felt and what is understood.” Sponsored by Department of Classics, Center for Western Civilization, and CHA. For further information, please contact Carole Newlands.

[Tuesday, November 11 or 18, 6:30pm VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Laurie Britton-Newell, a curator who has worked across the fields of contemporary art, craft and design in Europe and the USA. Whilst working at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London she curated critically acclaimed exhibitions such as "Memory Palace" in 2013, "Make La"b in 2011, "1:1: Architects Build Small Spaces" in 2010 and "Out of the Ordinary: Spectacular Craft" in 2008. She writes and lectures regularly about art and design. Laurie will curate an exhibition with students two weeks after the lecture. Sponsored by the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Friday, November 14, 12:00-1:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Performance Friday! featuring Erika Randall (Associate Professor of Dance, choreographer, and filmmaker) and Markas Henry (Associate Professor of Theatre and Head of Design) of the Department of Theatre and Dance. Randall and Henry will co-present their new screendance piece, “Less,” a lush and melancholic work of memory and forgetting, featuring CU BFA alum, Samantha Lysaght. Randall and Henry have been swapping imaginations since their first collaborative experience on the set of “Leading Ladies,” the 2010 award-winning independent feature film, co-produced and directed by Randall and her husband, Daniel Beahm. In the spring of 2012, Beahm, Henry, and Randall created the DFE/GCAH funded dancefilm project, “More,” which has screened at the Starz Denver Film Festival, the Sans Souci Festival of Dance Cinema, the Greensboro Dance Film Festival and was named one of the “Top Ten Shorts” of the Façade Film Festival in Plovdiv, Bulgaria. This new short dancefilm, entitled “Less,” vacillates between quiet, contemplative imagery (pieces of a letter falling overhead like snow, cotton candy savored at a funeral, a slow-motion ride on a carousel) and rapid-fire, gesture-rich dancing. Wearing a classical-length tutu made of office binder clips, a solo dancer explores notions of nostalgia, sensation, and grief as she moves through virtuosic phrases and theatrical vignettes. Photographs are clipped into and released from the skirt, the costume physically and metaphorically replicating notions of emotional scrapbooking and loss. Inspired by Randall’s aunt’s struggle with Bulbar ALS, “Less” borrows gestures from a body that is deteriorating at a rapid pace while the mind still grasps at an active, vibrant, and sensual history. Randall and Henry will show snippets from the in-process screendance and discuss the making of the stage work, its transformation into film, and the alchemic collision of costume and choreography. Doors open at 11:30 for free lunch. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Thursday, November 20, 4:30pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Please consider attending the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Reading Group's guest lecture by Dr. Joel Pace (University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire). "'Borne back ceaselessly into the past': Mapping Memory in Wheatley, Wordsworth, and the Black Atlantic." This talk should be of interest to anyone working in transatlantic studies, cartography, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century poetry, and many other sub-fields. Refreshments will be provided. We hope to see you at what is sure to be a great talk and discussion! Sponsored by Department of English and CHA. For further information, please contact Grace Rexroth.

[Thursday, November 20, 7:30pm, Eaton Humanities 150] Think! Talk, featuring Ryan Jenkins (CU-Boulder PhD graduate who will begin as Assistant Professor at California Polytechnic State in January 2015), "Don't Fear the Reapers: A Moral Argument for Drone Strike." Abstract: The widespread use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, or "drones") is perhaps the most controversial aspect of US foreign policy in a generation. In this talk, I give one argument that it is not just morally permissible, but morally obligatory to use drones in some cases. This is based on three claims: (1) that it is morally wrong to subject our soldiers to more harm than is necessary to accomplish a justified goal, unless we would sacrifice some other good, (2) drones always subject our soldiers to less risk than "putting boots on the ground" would, and (3) in many cases using drones does not sacrifice any other good or lead to any greater evil. I then review several common objections to drone strikes and show that they fail. Sponsored by Center for Values and Social Policy in the Department of Philosophy, and funded by The Collins Foundation. For further information, please contact the department at 303-492-6132.

December 2014

[Tuesday, December 2, 3:30pm, Hellems 269] Coffee Talk, featuring Raul Saucedo (Professor of Philosophy, CU-Boulder). "A Collectivist Account of Ontic Structural Realism." Bring a mug for coffee or tea. Sponsored by the Committee for the History and Philosophy of Science, and co-sponsored by the departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, go to CHPS Coffee Talks or email rchps@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, December 2, 7:15pm, ATLAS 100] Rumi Club Lecture and Book Signing, featuring Brian Catlos (Professor of Religious Studies). “The Muslims of the Medieval West.” Free Turkish food at the reception and book signing at 8:00. Sponsored by CU-Boulder’s Rumi Club and the Mediterranean Studies Group. For further information and to RSVP by December 1, please go to www.rumiclub.org or email rumiclub@colorado.edu.

[Friday, December 5, 12:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Performance Friday! featuring excerpts from Theatre and Dance's production of A Broadway Christmas Carol. If Charles Dickens had huddled with Rodgers and Hammerstein, Andrew Lloyd Webber, and Matt Stone and Trey Parker to write a holiday show, they just might have come up with A Broadway Christmas Carol. Simultaneously irreverent and respectful, the play offers a fresh, hilarious and charmingly recognizable retelling of Dickens’ classic holiday ghost story, complete with new lyrics to famous Broadway show tunes. Doors open at 11:30 for free lunch. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

January 2015

[Thursday, January 15, 4:00pm, ATLAS 229] The CU Mediterranean Group and collaborating programs and departments present "Beyond Crypto-Muslims: Perspectives on the Moriscos in the Early Modern Mediterranean," a seminar for faculty, graduate students and advanced undergraduates featuring CU Boulder alumna Amina Nawaz (PhD Candidate: St John’s College, Cambridge University). Shortly after the Christian conquest of Granada in 1492, religious and cultural practices associated with Islam and Muslims were banned across Spain. Despite this outlawing of their faith, many Muslims in the Iberian peninsula continued to practice Islam in varied ways. This paper examines the religious texts of these communities, known by historians as Moriscos, in order to explore what their devotional interests were within these new contexts. The extant manuscripts of the Moriscos reveal much about the intersections of religious communities within early modern Spain and the Mediterranean region and challenge our understandings of 'minorities' and 'majorities' in this space. This seminar will briefly outline the historical contexts of the period before turning to examine a selection of Morisco devotional manuscripts in greater detail. The manuscripts we will examine include Arabic, Romance and Aljamiado (Romance language written in the Arabic script) and will include samples from the sixteenth century Spanish context and seventeenth century North African context. All texts will be presented alongside English translations. To register and receive readings, please contact Aaron Stamper. The Spring 2015 CU Mediterranean Studies Group program is sponsored and supported at CU Boulder by Religious Studies, Art & Art History, the Center for Western Civilization, the College of Arts & Sciences, Jewish Studies, Classics, Spanish and Portuguese, History, and French and Italian. Additional support is provided by the Mediterranean Seminar, the Institute for Humanities Research and the Center for Mediterranean Studies at the University of California Santa Cruz, and the University of California Office of the President. For further information see www.cumediterranean.info. To join the Mediterranean Seminar, go to www.mediterraneanseminar.org.

[Friday, January 23, 3:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Exploring Digital Humanities Lecture Series: "Digital Humanities Research: Techniques and Questions," by William G. Thomas III (Chair, Department of History and John and Catherine Angle Professor in the Humanities, University of Nebraska Lincoln). This talk will explore the methods behind digital humanities research projects and will offer an introduction to the digital humanities. Examining a range of successful projects in History, Literary Studies, Media Studies, and Geography, as well as digital libraries, we will explore what the digital medium does well and how it can be used for humanities research. Thomas is a 19th-century American historian, particularly of railroads. Sponsored by President's Fund for the Humanities, CHA, Institute for Behavioral Sciences, University Libraries, Graduate School, Institute for Cognitive Science, Departments of English, Computer Science, Philosophy, Linguistics, Art and Art History, Political Science, and Anthropology. For further information, please go to www.colorado.edu/history/dhss or email Vilja Hulden.

[Tuesday, January 27, 3:30-5:00pm, Hellems 269] Coffee Talk, featuring Allan Franklin, Department of Physics. "Can a good experiment fail?" Bring a mug for coffee or tea. Sponsored by the Committee for the History and Philosophy of Science, and co-sponsored by the departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, go to CHPS Coffee Talks or email rchps@colorado.edu.

[Friday, January 30, 12:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Performance Friday! featuring Alejandro Cremaschi (Associate Professor of Piano Pedagogy at CU-Boulder), Elizabeth Kipper (Boulder Piano Quartet), and Thomas Heinrich (Colorado Symphony, who make up Trio Cordilleras. Trio Cordilleras has been captivating audiences with spirited music from Spain and Latin America since 2006. The trio has recorded for the label Meridian Records in the UK, and regularly performs around the state of Colorado. The repertoire of this concert includes works by the tango master Astor Piazzolla, and other Argentine and Brazilian composers. Doors open at 11:30 for free lunch. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

February 2015

[Tuesday, February 3, 6:30pm, VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Jacob Hashimoto. "My work explores big experiences, infinite worlds, emptiness, and potentials. These days, I’m developing a new body of work that explores the sublime, personal landscape, space, the universe and the mathematical and practical systems that we use to try and understand our place in the universe. I’m working with in collaboration with a number of science professionals to craft a series of new galactic landscape paintings and sculptures which concern our sense of home, nostalgia, and the hopes and terrors of the present and future.” Sponsored by Department of Art and Art History and the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Thursday, February 12, 12:00pm, CAS Conference Room, 1424 Broadway, Boulder] CAS Luncheon Series: Ariana Maki will discuss the upcoming exhibition at the CU Art Museum, Anonymous: Contemporary Tibetan Art. In 2006, the CU Art Museum (CUAM) exhibited Waves on the Turquoise Lake, the world’s first museum show dedicated to contemporary Tibetan art, a field that emerged only in the late 1990s. Since then, contemporary art from the Himalayas has become a hotbed of creativity and international attention. Beginning in February, CUAM will host Anonymous: Contemporary Tibetan Art, which highlights photography, painting, sculpture and digital video created since 2008. This luncheon talk highlights some of the artworks and artists involved in Anonymous, and how they express perspectives on modernization, global culture, the commodification of Buddhism, and the search for the self. Ariana Maki is a lecturer in CU's Department of Art and Art History and Department of Religious Studies. She holds a Ph.D. in Art History with a specialization in Buddhist Art. Ariana is also Assistant Curator at Himalayan Art Resources and maintains a research affiliation with the National Library and Archives of Bhutan. For more information about this exhibit, visit www.contemporarytibetanart.org/. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu.

[Thursday, February 12, 4:00pm, CHEM 142] CAS Speaker Series: Free film screenings of The Land of Many Palaces and Mountain Town. China is currently experiencing the most rapid urbanization of any place in history, with plans to relocate 250 million rural villagers into cities over the next two decades. New cities are popping up, seemingly overnight, and rural people are adjusting to a whole new way of life as they move from farmhouses into high-rise apartments and face a life no longer lived off the land. In The Land of Many Palaces co-directors Adam Smith and Song Ting chronicle this transformation in the Inner Mongolian city of Ordos. The film follows a government official who must convince local farmers that their lives will be better off in the city, and a farmer in one of the last remaining villages in the region who is pressured to move. Smith will also offer a preview screening his new film, Mountain Town, about the replica Wyoming town of Jackson Hole in Hebei, China. Free and open to the public. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For more information see www.thelandofmanypalaces.com or contact casevent@colorado.edu.

[Thursday, February 12, 5:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Exploring Digital Humanities Lecture Series: "It's In the Air: Digital Histories of Medicine," by E. Thomas Ewing (Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, and Professor in Department of History, Virginia Tech). Sponsored by President's Fund for the Humanities, CHA, Institute for Behavioral Sciences, University Libraries, Graduate School, Institute for Cognitive Science, Departments of English, Computer Science, Philosophy, Linguistics, Art and Art History, Political Science, and Anthropology. For further information, please go to www.colorado.edu/history/dhss or email Vilja Hulden.

[Friday, February 13, 12:00pm, University Theatre] Performance Friday! featuring excerpts from Theatre and Dance's production of Tartuffe. French playwright Molière’s comic masterpiece skewers religious hypocrisy, mindless piety and sexual deceit was so daring at the time of its writing that audience members could be excommunicated for seeing it. Tartuffe tells how a “man of the cloth” worms his way into the gullible heart of Orgon, a rich family man, and tries to take him for all he has. It takes a desperate trap by Orgon’s wife Elmire to expose the imposter. Doors open at 11:30 for free lunch. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, February 17, 6:30pm, VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Extrapolation Factory. The Extrapolation Factory is an imagination-based studio for design-led futures studies, founded by Elliott P. Montgomery and Chris Woebken. The studio focuses on developing future scenarios, embodied as artifacts in familiar, present-day contexts. The Extrapolation Factory proposes a method for collaboratively envisioning possible futures with diverse participants, experts and non-experts, and doing so in a variety of accessible ways. With this work, the studio is exploring the value of rapidly imagined, prototyped, deployed and evaluated visions of possible futures on an extended time scale. Sponsored by Department of Art and Art History and the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Wednesday, February 18, 6:00pm, Old Main Chapel] CAS Speaker Series: "Dance Arirang: Traditional Korean Dance and Music by Lee Mi Sook Dance Company of South Korea." This event is in honor of American veterans of the Korean War. It features traditional Korean music and dance by Lee Mi Sook Dance Company of South Korea. Hosted by National Unification Advisory Council Denver Chapter, sponsored by the Korea Foundation and collaborated by CKA, KSODA CSKA and Center for Asian Studies at CU Boulder.. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu, 303-735-5122.

[Wednesday, February 18, 6:30pm, Eaton Humanities 1B50] The Center of the American West’s Modern Indian Identity series is thrilled to present Montana filmmakers Andrew Smith and Alex Smith and their movie, Winter in the Blood for a free screening and conversation. An adaptation of James Welch’s seminal novel of the same name, Winter in the Blood offers an intimate portrait of Native life that, as Howie Movshovitz says, “leaves ‘feathers or leather’ clichés behind.” Following the film NPR film critic Howie Movshovitz, the Center of the American West Faculty Director Patty Limerick, and Alex and Andrew Smith will engage in a discussion about the film and the issues it raises. Don’t miss this very special evening. This event is made possible by Liz and Tony Moores. For more information, please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Friday, February 20, 4:00pm, Hale 230] The Graduate Student Speaker Series in Cultural Anthropology is pleased to announce Dr. Kimberly Theidon's (Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center and Associate Professor at the Fletcher School, Tufts University) public talk at CU Boulder. She is an anthropologist and scholar of Peru and Colombia. "Hidden in Plain Sight: Children Born of Wartime Sexual Violence." Abstract: Over the past decade, there has been increased international attention to conflict-related rape and sexual violence. A series of UN Security Council Resolutions, collectively known as the Women, Peace and Security agenda, have overwhelmingly focused on women and girls as victims of sexual violence. Strikingly absent in this agenda are two groups: men and boys as victims of sexual violence, and children born as a result of wartime rape. What do we know about these children? During the last decade alone, it is estimated that tens of thousands of children have been born worldwide as a result of mass rape campaigns or wartime sexual exploitation. What about these living legacies of rape and sexual violence? Although children born of wartime rape have remained largely invisible on the international agenda, empirical data indicates they are not so invisible in the families and communities in which they live. At the local level, these children are likely to be hidden in plain sight. Sponsored by Department of Anthropology, Latin American Studies Center, Graduate Committee on the Arts and Humanities, and the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research. For questions, contact Alison Hanson.

[Monday, February 23, 3:15-5:00pm, Hellems 201] The Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science hosts Melinda Fagan (Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of Utah) as part of its Distinguished Speaker series. “Explanation, Unification, and Mechanisms.” Professor Fagan's research is in philosophy of science, focusing on experimental practice in biology (particularly stem cell and developmental biology), explanation, and conceptions of objectivity and evidence. A small reception will follow in Hellems 269. The Committee on the History and Philosophy of Science seeks to bring together scholars from the sciences and the humanities in order to promote cross-disciplinary communication that may facilitate work done in both areas. CHPS is co-sponsored by the departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, please contact rchps@colorado.edu.

[Monday, February 23, 5:30pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Visiting Scholar Lecture Series: "John la Farge and The Reinvention of Stained Glass in America”, by Jeffery Howe (Professor of Art History at Boston College), specializing in late 19th and early 20th century European art and also American architecture. This topic is based on his work curating an upcoming (September-December 2015) exhibition titled John La Farge and the Recovery of the Sacred at the McMullen Museum at Boston College. Professor Howe will discuss La Farge’s innovations in the field of stained glass, and his position as an artist between Realism and Symbolism. Sponsored by Department of Art and Art History and the Visiting Scholar Program. For further information, please click here.

[Tuesday, February 24, 6:30pm, VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Tsherin Sherpa. Tsherin was trained in traditional Himalayan art beginning at the age of 12 and worked in that style until 2007. After the US economy shifted in 2008, Tsherin began to explore other styles of expression, some of which incorporate ideas he encountered while doing advertising imagery and studying computer science. His works address economic change, cultural change, the quest for identity, meaning of Buddhism and its imagery. With his foundation in traditional Tibetan thangka painting, his approach yields fresh insights into the shifting values of Tibetan society. Sponsored by Department of Art and Art History and the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Thursday, February 26, 12:00pm, CAS Conference Room, 1424 Broadway, Boulder] CAS Luncheon Series: "Immaterial Bodies: Images of the Body in Medieval India." In this talk, Loriliai Biernacki, Associate Professor in Religious Studies, will address the idea of wonder in medieval Indian Tantra. For the West, the notion of wonder early in the tradition bifurcates into two somewhat divergent conceptions. For Socrates and Plato wonder is the beginning of philosophy, and beckons to an openness, an indeterminacy that stops the constrictions of speech. For Aristotle, on the other hand, wonder prompts us to search for cause and effect. It is a goad, a curiosity that leads to its own erasure as the spellbound silence of wonder is replaced by knowledge. For Aristotle ignorance provokes wonder, yet wonder is not appropriate for mature philosophers. The medieval Indian philosopher Abhinavagupta, writing in the early 11th century, however, tracks the notion of wonder in a different fashion, linking wonder, camatkāra, with the capacity for a vital self reflexivity. In this presentation, Biernacki will examine the implications of Abhinavagupta's conception of wonder. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu.

[Friday, February 27, 1:00pm (UMC Gallery) and Saturday, February 28, 9:00am (Eaton Humanities 250)] CUBASGA Graduate Student Conference. This conference is a two-day event that brings together graduate students from Boulder and other schools to share graduate-level research on various aspects of East Asian Civilizations. Two key note speakers, Professor Ding Xiang Warner from Cornell and Professor Michael Emmerich from UCLA, will be present through all panels. Sponsored by Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations, The Center for Asian Studies, The Vice Chancellor's Office, ODECE, and CCS.

March 2015

[Tuesday, March 3, 6:30pm, VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Nicole Cherubini. Informed by Baroque as well as Minimalist tendencies, Nicole Cherubini's recent sculptures reveal her investigation of nonhierarchical space through a diversity of materials, both rich with texture and geometrically shaped. By juxtaposing clay- including terra-cotta, porcelain, stoneware, and white earthenware- along with wood, MDF, and other found objects, her work vies with notions of support and structure, labor and function, movement and time. Her process has an affinity towards physical space, form, and material, and is deeply embedded in the concept of an egalitarian use of elements, whether an object or a corporeal act. Sponsored by Department of Art and Art History and the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Friday, March 6, 5:00pm, Eaton Humanities 250] CAS Speaker Series: "Steampunk-ed Kung Fu: Transnational Modernity in Hong Kong Director Stephen Fung's Tai Chi Films." Kenneth Chan of the University of Northern Colorado will present on Hong Kong director Stephen Fun's two-part 3D martial arts extravaganza, Tai Chi Zero and Tai Chi Hero. These kung fu flicks would have been unremarkable as Hong Kong entries to the genre if not for the fact that the director has amalgamated, rather creatively, the martial arts film with a form of retro science fiction: steampunk films. While the deployment of this fin de siècle fantasy aesthetic injects new life to contemporary martial arts cinema (since Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon renewed global attention to the genre in 2000), Chan wishes to unpack its cultural logic by suggesting (1) that the film reformulates the familiar tension between Chinese cultural traditionalism and technologized modernity, and (2) that it forces a rethinking of China's and Chinese cultures' relationship to the West, especial with the rise of China as a modern economic giant and a major player in 21st century global capitalism. Does technology function as a cinematic/cultural trope to signify China's entry into the circuit of cosmopolitan engagement? And if so, what are the ideological and cultural implications of this mode of representation? This event is part of our 2014-15 "Mediating Asia" series and is sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu.

[Saturday, March 7, 10:30am-4:30pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Kayden Symposium in Celebration of Ennius and the Architecture of the Annales, a book by Jackie Elliott (Department of Classics). Speakers include Emma Dench (Harvard), "Thinking Historically with Ennius' Annales"; Sander Goldberg (UCLA), "Maius nascitur Iliade: How did the Annales happen?"; Joseph Farrell (University of Pennsylvania), "Paradigms of Epic Heroism in Ennius' Annales"; and Chris Kraus (Yale), Shredding the Text: Ennius, Skutsch and Elliott." Free and open to the public. The symposium is funded by the Eugene M. Kayden Award, GCAH, the Center for Western Civilization, and the Department of Classics. For further information, please contact Jackie Elliott.

[Monday, March 9, 5:30pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Visiting Scholar Lecture Series: Alisa LaGamma (Ceil and Michael E. Pulitzer-Curator in Charge within the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas at the Metropolitan Museum of Art). Her work has been instrumental in rethinking the history of sub-Saharan African art and culture. In 2012 the Bard Graduate Center recognized her work with the Iris Award for Outstanding Scholarship. LaGamma’s Heroic Africans: Legendary Leaders, Iconic Sculptures publication received the 2012 International Tribal Art Book Prize. In 2007 the Association of Art Museum Curators recognized the publication for her exhibition Eternal Ancestors: Art of the Central African Reliquary as among the profession’s outstanding exhibition catalogues. Her 2008 exhibition The Essential Art of African Textiles: Design Without End addressed historical continuities between classical forms of expression from sub-Saharan Africa and the work of leading contemporary artists from the region. Sponsored by Department of Art and Art History and the Visiting Scholar Program. For further information, please click here.

[Wednesday, March 11, 4:00pm, location TBA] CAS Speaker Series: "History of the Mongol Empire," a lecture by Morris Rossabi (Distinguished Professor of History, Columbia University). This lecture is on the history of Islam in China and thehistory of the Mongol empire in Asia. Sponsored by Center of Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu.

[Wednesday, March 11, 4:00pm, Special Collections (3rd floor of Norlin Library)] An opening reception for The Book’s Undoing: Dieter Roth’s Artist’s Books exhibit will be held Wednesday, March 11, at 4 p.m. in the Norlin Library Special Collections Reading Room. The exhibit, which is on display now through May 15, 2015, features Dieter Roth’s Gesammelte Werke (Collected Works), a 26-volume self-published catalog of reconstructed versions of his books. It was curated by German PhD candidate Maggie Rosenau, who is also enrolled in the Museum Studies Certification Program. The exhibit is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, email spc@colorado.edu or call 303-492-6144.

[Wednesday, March 11, 6:30pm, Old Main Chapel] FrackingSENSE, featuring Dr. Jeffrey Jacquet, "Community Impacts from Hydraulic Fracturing: the Importance of Public Participation and the Distribution of Costs and Benefits." These FrackingSENSE lectures offer unique perspectives on Hydraulic Fracturing and Natural Gas and Oil development. Sponsored by Center of the American West. For further information, please contact www.centerwest.org.

[Thursday, March 12, 12:00pm, CAS Conference Room, 1424 Broadway, Boulder] CAS Luncheon Series: "AREND Fights Poaching of Rhinos for Horns Used in Chinese Medicine." Wildlife conservation needs support to protect rhinos, elephants, and other endangered species from cruel poaching that may lead to extinction within the next ten years. Rhino horns are used in Chinese medicine, primarily in Vietnam, and China has a major industry in carving of ivory. AREND is a sensor aircraft for aerial surveillance specialized for detecting people, large animals, and specific shapes such as crashed aircraft. The AREND aircraft is an unmanned aerial system (UAS) designed from the bottom up to hold select sensors in modular arrangements. This translates to higher quality resource management, efficacy, capability and versatility, and lower operating cost for the National Parks organizations of Wildlife Reserves in Africa and elsewhere. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu.

[Friday, March 13, 12:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Performance Friday! featuring Matthew Chellis, Assistant Professor of Voice. Professor Chellis will do a presentation on Benjamin Britten's work "On this Island" with words by W.H. Auden, with discussion of the convergence of world events, art, and the meeting of Auden and Britten on the creation of this amazing work of vocal music. Doors open at 11:30 for free lunch. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Saturday, March 14, 1:00 and Sunday, March 15, 1:00, Eaton Humanities 250] CAS Speaker Series: "Transnationalism and its Discontents: Exploring Critical Approaches to Border-space." This conference is on transnationalism, with a particular focus on East Asian texts in a transnational context. A collaborative effort between faculty and graduate students, this conference is designed to encourage new approaches to Asian Studies through the consideration of contemporary transnational literature, film, performance, and criticism. The event will feature as its keynote speaker acclaimed transnational writer Tawada Yōko, as well as a selection of transnational scholars working at institutions across the United States and worldwide. Sponsored by Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations and Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, March 17, 3:30-5:00pm, Hellems 269] Coffee Talk, featuring Roger Pulwarty, NOAA. "Climate and decisions: are we learning but not doing?" Bring a mug for coffee or tea. Sponsored by the Committee for the History and Philosophy of Science, and co-sponsored by the departments of Anthropology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geological Sciences, History, Mathematics, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Philosophy, Physics, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Humanities and the Arts. For further information, go to CHPS Coffee Talks or email rchps@colorado.edu.

[Tuesday, March 17, 6:30pm, VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Alex + Rebecca Webb. Best known for his vibrant and complex color work especially from Latin America and the Caribbean, Alex Webb has published 11 books, including The Suffering of Light, a collection of 30 years of his color work, and Violet Isle and Memory City, two collaborations with Rebecca Norris Webb. Alex has exhibited at museums worldwide including the Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y., the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y., and the Guggenheim Museum, N.Y. Alex became a full member of Magnum Photos in 1979. His work has appeared in New York Times Magazine, National Geographic, Geo, and other publications. He has received numerous awards and grants including a Hasselblad Foundation Grant in 1998 and a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2007. Rebecca Norris Webb has published five photography books, including most recently Memory City (with Alex Webb), a meditation on film, memory, and time, and Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb on Street Photography and the Poetic Image. Originally a poet, she often interweaves her text and photographs in her books, most notably with her third book, My Dakota—an elegy for her brother who died unexpectedly—which will be exhibited this February at Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, Oregon, and this summer at The Cleveland Museum of Art. Additionally her work has been shown at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Ricco/Maresca Gallery, NY, and is in the collections of the MFA, Boston, George Eastman House Museum, Santa Barbara Museum of Art, among others. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and Le Monde Magazine. Sponsored by Department of Art and Art History and the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Friday, March 20, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] “What metre do donkeys bray in?: The Politics of Prosody in the Romantic Period.” This talk by Tim Fulford (Professor of English, De Montfort University, Leicester) will look at experimental poetry, prosodic theory and speech therapy, literary reviews, and satirical prints. Professor Fulford will be asking how, why, and to what effect poetic form and meter became politicized in the Romantic period. A prolific scholar, Professor Fulford is the author of six monographs, including The Late Poetry of the Early Romantics (Cambridge, 2013) and Romantic Indians: Native Americans and Transatlantic Literary Culture 1755-1830 (Oxford, 2006). Sponsored by Department of English. For further information, please contact Jill Heydt-Stevenson.

[Sunday, March 22, 11:59pm, Macky Auditorium, room 229] You could have five hundred dollars sitting on your hard drive, or better yet, sitting in some untapped corner of your mind. We are looking for entries for our 16th annual Thompson Awards for Western Writing and first prize in each of the four categories is five hundred dollars! So all you fiction writers, poets, academics, journalists, and memoirists have a shot and best of all, there’s no entry fee. Let us know what you see, what you know, what you feel, what you’ve experienced of the American West and perhaps we’ll be able to turn it into accolades and cash! This is a blind contest; judges will not know the names of the student contestants. So make sure that the work you submit does not include your name. See contest rules for eligibility and other details. For more information, please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

April 2015

[Thursday, April 2, 12:00pm, CAS Conference Room, 1424 Broadway, Boulder] CAS Luncheon Series: "'Everything has Changed': Gender Roles, Generational Change, and the Meaning of Work for Women in Bangalore, India's Technology Center." Rachel Fleming, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Anthropology, will present her research on working women in Bangalore. In the past three generations and especially since economic liberalization in the 1990s, the southern Indian city of Bangalore has become a global information technology center. As more women join this workforce, they are challenging established ideas about gender roles in India and redefining their relationships with family, partners, and friends. Based on ethnographic research in Bangalore, this presentation explores how different generations of women in Bangalore reflect on the changes in women's lives, finding that older women question the benefits of work and express regret that they did not work, while younger women actively critique what they see as entrenched sexism and seek to redefine gendered expectations. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu.

[Monday, April 6, 5:30pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Visiting Scholar Lecture Series: "Translating Art" by Mary Ann Caws (Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature, English, and French at the Graduate School of the City University of New York). Her many areas of interest in twentieth-century avant-garde literature and art include Surrealism, poets Rene Char and Andre Breton, Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury group, and artists Robert Motherwell, Joseph Cornell, and Pablo Picasso. Conceptually, one of her primary themes has been the relationship between image and text. Sponsored by Department of Art and Art History and the Visiting Scholar Program. For further information, please click here.

[Tuesday, April 7, 6:30pm, VAC 1B20] Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Bruce Pollock. Natural occurring mathematical systems, geometric imagery and fractal formations are the basis of Pollock’s creative work. Forms and patterns are found throughout the spectrum of reality in clouds, rivers, cells, organisms and ecosystems. They constitute the visual language from which his abstract drawings and paintings are made. His objective is to link art to the depths of human experience and raise the viewer’s awareness into a perception of the infinite. Sponsored by Department of Art and Art History and the Visiting Artist Program. For further information, please contact valerie.albicker@colorado.edu, 303-492-2539.

[Tuesday, April 7, 7:30pm, Muenzinger Auditorium] The Center of the American West is proud to host a screening of Losing the West, a documentary about small ranching and farming, exemplified by the story of a lifelong Colorado cowboy. Howard Linscott IS the original Marlboro Man, a gruff, chain-smoking 70-year-old who’s been ranching all his life. With sweeping shots of the Colorado Rockies, the film explores whether cherished Western traditions and this fiercely independent lifestyle can survive as they collide with inevitable population growth in the West and its dwindling natural resources. The presentation will be followed by a discussion between Patty Limerick and the film’s Director and Producer, Alex Warren. For more information, please contact admin@centerwest.org, 303-492-4879.

[Wednesday, April 8, 5:00pm, Eaton Humanities 1B50] Asian Lanugage Night. This event celebrates the languages and cultures of Asia through students' performances in Arabic, Chinese, Farsi, Hindi, Japanese, and Korean. There will be a reception following the event. For further information, contact casevent@colorado.edu.

[Wednesday, April 8, 6:30pm, Math 100] FrackingSENSE, featuring Dr. Anthony Ingraffea, Cornell University Professor and influential 'talking head' in Josh Fox's "Gasland." In conversation with Patty Limerick. These FrackingSENSE lectures offer unique perspectives on Hydraulic Fracturing and Natural Gas and Oil development. Sponsored by Center of the American West. For further information, please contact www.centerwest.org.

[Thursday, April 9, 5:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Exploring Digital Humanities Lecture Series: "Spatial Narrative: The Challenge of Mapping Experience," by Anne Knowles (Professor, Department of Geography, Middlebury College). Sponsored by President's Fund for the Humanities, CHA, Institute for Behavioral Sciences, University Libraries, Graduate School, Institute for Cognitive Science, Departments of English, Computer Science, Philosophy, Linguistics, Art and Art History, Political Science, and Anthropology. For further information, please go to www.colorado.edu/history/dhss or email Vilja Hulden.

[Thursday, April 9, 6:00pm, Hale 270] CAS Speaker Series: "Yoga, Nature Cure and 'Perfect Health': The Purity of the Fluid Body in an Impure World." In this lecture, Dr. Joesph Alter, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh, presents an answer to the question of why the practice of yoga postures (asana) and breaking exercises (pranayama) came to be understood within the framework of Nature Cure in modern India, as institutionalized in the Central Council for Research on Yoga and Naturopathy. The focus is on the correlation between purification and embodied perfection, and the way in which impurity is understood to be problematic for health, as well as for the development of transcendent consciousness. Swami Sivananda's early publications on healing and medicine are used to show how a biomedical doctor who renounced the world and established the Divine Life Society--what became one of the most influential centers in the development of modern yoga--integrated elements from yoga and Nature Cure into his understanding of the body, embodied impurity, and the perfection of health. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu.

[Friday, April 10, 12:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Performance Friday! featuring excerpts from CU Opera's production of L'incoronazione di Poppea, Monteverdi’s drama about sex, crime and realpolitik during the debauched reign of the Roman Emperor Nero, turning conventional morality on its head—virtue is punished and greed rewarded. The score soars but the sensual duet between Nero and his lover—eventually wife—Poppea, Pur ti miro, pur ti godo—meaning, “I gaze at you, I possess you”—is the pièce de résistance. Sung in Italian with English surtitles. This production will be styled after the hit Netflix realpolitik series 'House of Cards,' starring Kevin Spacey. Doors open at 11:30 for free lunch. Sponsored by CHA. For further information, please contact cu-cha@colorado.edu.

[Friday, April 17, 10:00am, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] 4th Annual CAS Symposium: "Mediating Asia." Details are forthcoming. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies.

[Thursday, April 23, 12:00pm, CAS Conference Room, 1424 Broadway, Boulder] CAS Luncheon Series: "Indian Foreign Policy: An Historical Perspective," by Mithi Mukherjee, Associate Professor in Department of History. Sponsored by Center for Asian Studies. For further information, please contact casevent@colorado.edu.

[Friday, April 24, 3:00pm, British Studies (5th floor of Norlin Library)] Exploring Digital Humanities Lecture Series: Title TBD by Evan Roberts (Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Minnesota). Sponsored by President's Fund for the Humanities, CHA, Institute for Behavioral Sciences, University Libraries, Graduate School, Institute for Cognitive Science, Departments of English, Computer Science, Philosophy, Linguistics, Art and Art History, Political Science, and Anthropology. For further information, please go to www.colorado.edu/history/dhss or email Vilja Hulden.

[Tuesday, April 28, 6:30pm, Wolf Law, Wittemyer Courtroom] FrackingSENSE, featuring Dr. Matthew Cotton, "The Politics of Shale Gas in the United Kingdom." These FrackingSENSE lectures offer unique perspectives on Hydraulic Fracturing and Natural Gas and Oil development. Sponsored by Center of the American West. For further information, please contact www.centerwest.org.

May 2015