Session Descriptions

Note: This list is not in any particular order. To review the sessions in chronological order go to the Pre-conference detail page or the Main Conference detail page and select any title to view the session description.

11/15/2010, 9:30 AM-5:00 PM    (Pre-Conference)

Working with Tagged PDF Documents, Karen McCall, Karlan Communications

Session Description

Learn how to create and work with tagged PDF documents using various applications such as Microsoft Office and desktop publishing software. Bring your PDF problem documents and questions to work with in this hands-on and demonstration workshop.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This pre-conference session assumes that you are working with tagged PDF documents and need answers to real life and real time solutions for "wonky" content. The emphasis is on your documents and your questions.The content for the workshop is based on "Accessible and Usable PDF Documents: Techniques for Document Authors Second Edition" by Karen McCall. Topics covered include Office 2007annd 2010, PDF fron ImDesign, scanned PdF documents and legacy PDF documents. The repiar tools available in Acrobat will be identified and explored in context with repairs. Techniques for dealing with problematic document elements will also be covered.

Keypoints

  1. What can go wrong when converting Office docs to tagged PDF.
  2. How to make repairs in tagged documents.
  3. How to identify problematic document elements/Tags.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 0 0 1 All

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
11/16/2010, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM    (Pre-Conference)

Accessible Content with Word and PowerPoint 2010, Karen McCall, Karlen Communications

Session Description

This session will provide an overview of how to work with accessible content in Word and PowerPoint 2010. Topics include the Accesibility Checker, choosing which document parts to use in a document and developing a strategy for identifying ehich document parts touse in various situations.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Microsoft Office 2010 now includes an accessibility checker and an acronym manager. These are two of the useful tools at your fingertips to help create and work with more accessible content in PowerPoint, Word and Excel. While there are document parts in both Word and PowerPoint that are accessible to people using adaptive technology the accessibility often depends on how the document is going to be distributed. By knowing which document parts are accessible under which distribution type document authors can make better choices in creating their documents. This session is framed within the Chapter 5 standards of the Section 508 Refresh.

Keypoints

  1. Identify the distribution method for doucments and how this impacts document creation.
  2. Examine the accessible document parts and how to use them effectively.
  3. Mapping accessible documents to Chapter 5 of the SEction 508 refresh.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 0 0 1 All

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

11/15, 9:30 AM-5:00 PM  - 11/16/2010, 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM 

(Pre-Conference)

The AHEAD Institute on Accessible Curriculum Production*

*(This is a 2-day session: Lecture on Monday and Lab on Tuesday, Nov. 16)

Session Description

Building on the very popular AHEAD E-Text Institutes, this third installment of the series and will focus primarily on the conversion of publisher, and other third party provided source files. The effective use of AltFormat materials and the hardware and software products used by learners with be an area of focus.

Expertise Level: Intermediate to Advanced

Abstract

This workshop is designed for an intermediate to advanced audience and will build on the content of the prior trainings. We will explore advanced management topics, dealing with publisher-produced content, the creation and archiving of content, and advanced editing techniques. Participants will develop expert alt format production and management techniques, become familiar with the use of a variety of tools for the creation and editing of digital curricular content, and learn advanced techniques for data storage and management. It is recommended that participants have participated in a prior AHEAD e-text training or equivalent, or discuss the content with the presenters prior to participating.

Keypoints

  1. What characteristics of alt format materials are best suited to individual learners with print related disabilities
  2. How do you maximize the effectiveness of the alt format materials that are provided.
  3. How are source files from third party providers prepared for alt format production
  4. How to properly structure a document for efficient alt format production

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 0 0 1 All

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1

11/16/10, 1:30 PM-4:30 PM

(Pre-Conference)

Geek to Geek: getting under the hood with coding, universal design & accessibility

Session Description

This session will go where other sessions often fail to go: the coding techniques and other underlying technical aspects that are available to make web pages accessible. This session will look at the creation of semantic-based markup (xhtml in particular), structured web design, the use of CSS to separate content from format and CSS techniques to promote accessible web design. The advantages of Web Standards and Universal Design for not only accessibility but usability for all users and platforms will be addressed.

Expertise Level: Advanced

Abstract

 

Keypoints

  1. Structured web design, web standards and universal design are approaches that can be used to only ensure accessibility but usability and the creation of effective interfaces.
  2. What are the specific xhtml, CSS and javascript techniques that can be used to implement effective and accessible web design.
  3. What resources are available to further the skills of the web designer and programmer as a follow-up to this session.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 0 0 1 All

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1
11/17/2010, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Reframing Learning Styles: Engaging Traditional & Nontraditional Learners, Myra Lerch, Consultant, High Tech Center Training Unit

Session Description

This interactive presentation will provide a fresh framework for understanding and engaging a diverse range of learners, traditional and nontraditional. It will introduce the recently-developed Learning Styles Profile and the concept of the Passive/Active Divide.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

How can we incorporate universal design for learning directly into teaching? To fully understand learning styles as they relate to students, we need to establish a foundation in which participants identify their individual learning styles profile. The majority of teachers—identified as traditional learners—teach in the same manner in which they learn best. The newly-developed Learning Styles Profile which participants will take offers the following: . Uses more current terminology, technology (e.g., texting, WhisperPhone) . Has students identify their strongest TWO styles (others identify main one) . Provides results in both numeric & graphic format so students can see relative strengths, areas of difficulty . New terms for visual subdivisions: Visual Graphic & Visual Text Through multiple means of active engagement, this presentation will demonstrate tangible tools/strategies to engage a diverse range of learners. Specific teaching strategies will be modeled throughout the presentation, including opportunities for active participation.

Keypoints

  1. Identify their individual learning styles profile, represented in both numeric & graphic formats
  2. Specify two tools/strategies for each of the four learning styles
  3. Incorporate a range of multi-modal tools/strategies directly into their teaching

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1
11/16/2010, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM    (Pre-Conference)

Lab: Building Accessible Web Applications with ARIA, Jared Smith & Jonathan Whiting, WebAIM

Session Description

Learn how to make accessible web pages or applications using ARIA (Accessible Rich Internet Applications), a W3C specification for increasing the accessibility of dynamic, complex web applications. ARIA allows web developers to add simple markup to their web pages to significantly increase the accessibility of dynamic and AJAX-driven content, scripted widgets and interactive controls (such as sliders, table grids, drag and drop, etc.), and keyboard interactions. (Note that this session goes very well with the afternoon "Building an Accessible HTML5 Web Page" session.)

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Web pages are becoming increasingly complex and dynamic. Web applications with increased power, flexibility, and productivity are quickly replacing traditional software applications. As the web advances, the underlying technologies that support accessibility have generally remained stagnant. The accessibility features of HTML and scripting have remained unchanged in recent years. The introduction of the ARIA (Accessible Rich Internet Applications) specification allows additional markup and coding to greatly enhance standard HTML and increased accessibility. This session will provide an overview of the ARIA specification and markup, and will present numerous examples of ARIA being implemented 'in the wild' to allow greater accessibility in web pages and applications. Keypoints

  1. Learn about rich internet applications, the accessibility challenges of dynamic web pages and web applications, and how HTML alone is insufficient to address modern-day web accessibility.
  2. Gain an overview of the ARIA specification. Learn how ARIA can increase accessibility. Learn the limitations of ARIA.
  3. See and implement ARIA into real-world examples. Identify ARIA resources.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1
11/16/2010, 1:30 PM-4:30 PM    (Pre-Conference)

Lab: Building an Accessible HTML5 Web Page, Jared Smith & Jonathan Whiting, WebAIM

Session Description

Learn how to build an accessible web page using HTML5, the new version of HTML that is currently under development. HTML5 has many new accessibility features that can be implemented in all web documents, from bare-bones HTML5 documents to dynamic, complex web applications. Learn how to build a new HTML5 web page while taking advantage of the new HTML5 accessibility features. (Note that this session goes very well with the morning "Building Accessible Web Applications with ARIA" session.)

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

HTML5 is currently under development as the next major revision of the HTML standard. HTML5 features many new features, extensions, and APIs, many of which support increased accessibility from previous versions of HTML or XHTML. This session will provide an overview HTML5 with a focus on the new accessibility features, including native video and video captioning, document structural elements, form elements and controls, SVG, and canvas. This session will provide and overview of HTML5, its accessibility features and limitations, the current progress of accessibility in HTML5, and walk you through building a highly accessible HTML5 document.

Keypoints

  1. Learn about HTML5 and it's new accessibility features.
  2. Identify where HTML5 can be used to increase web accessibility. Learn the limitations of HTML5.
  3. Learn how to build a new, accessible HTML5 web page.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1
11/17/2010, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Three Possibilities: Which Digital DAISY Player is Right for You? Robert Beach, Kansas City Kansas Community College

Session Description

A side-by-side comparison of three digital book players: Victor Reader Stream, Book Sense, and PlexTalk Pocket.This session will give a side-by-side comparison of three digital portable book players: the Victor Reader Stream from HumanWare, the Book Sense from GW Micro, and the Plextalk Pocket from

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This session will give a side-by-side comparison of three digital portable book players: the Victor Reader Stream from HumanWare, the Book Sense from GW Micro, and the Plextalk Pocket from Plextor. Features discussed will include: design, supported formats, text-to-speech quality, navigation, transferring files, and more.

Keypoints

  1. The three players are all good choices
  2. There's no such thing as "the perfect player"
  3. All three players have similarities and differences

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
11/18/10, 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

Do We Need to Change the Web Accessibility Game Plan? (Panel Discussion) Moderator: Jared Smith, WebAIM

Session Description

This panel will provide a discussion of current web accessibility efforts and whether they are effective or not, how they can be improved, and what can be done to ensure that web accessibility keeps up with the pace of innovative web technologies.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Web accessibility for people with disabilities has certainly advanced in recent years, yet many believe that the gap between innovation and accessibility is widening (http://rebuildingtheweb.com/en/need-new-plan-to-make-web-accessible/). Is it time to rethink our approach to web accessibility? Is the traditional approach of following accessibility principles and guidelines optimal with web content and applications that are increasingly dynamic and rich? How can web accessibility be more mainstream and less stuffy and boring? This panel will investigate the current effectiveness of web accessibility, discuss whether a new game plan is necessary, and present how web accessibility advocates can greatly improve their efforts and enjoyment in making the web a better, more accessible place for everyone.

Keypoints:

  1. Are current web accessibility efforts effective considering current web innovations and changes?
  2. What is the role of web accessibility guidelines, standards, and standards advocacy in furthering web accessibility?
  3. Is web accessibility too pedantic, stuffy, technical, and boring? How can we make it more exciting?
  4. How can web accessibility advocacy and education be more effective and mainstreamed?
  5. Is it time to totally rethink the web accessibility game plan and 'reboot' our efforts?

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
11/18/2010, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Lecture: Making My Own Alternative Formats – a Student Skill for Life? Steve Bennett, Dolphin Computer Access Inc.

Session Description

Following a recent British Government pilot study empowering K12 students to create their own alternative format learning materials, the session will exam the pros and cons of this approach, reviewing the learning independence achieved, as well as the tools used during the pilot.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This session will introduce and evaluate a new approach for the provision of alternative format materials for K12 students in full time education. Currently being evaluated through a 12-month British Government funded trial, the new paradigm aims to be ‘student centric’ focusing on training, equipping and educating vision impaired and learning disabled students to be self sufficient in their creation of their own Braille, large print, MP3 and DAISY formats. The premise for this approach is that students will develop life skills that will empower them to develop independence through their education that can then be extended through to employment and their wider lives. This presentation will examine and evaluate the project software, tools, resources, and processes; as well as the trial’s successes and failures from the perspective of the vision impaired students, learning disabled students and their teaching professionals. Qualitative insights and quantitative findings will also be shared.

Keypoints

  1. An in depth understanding of the UK Government trial where students created their own alternative formats.
  2. An overview of the tools, software, resources and formats used in the trial.
  3. The trials findings.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 0 0
11/18/2010, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Lecture: Testing Moodle for Accessibility and Usability, Lisa Fiedor, NC State University

Session Description

In this session, participants will learn about the process NC State University has developed for testing the accessibility and usability of Moodle for students with disabilities. The session will cover results of testing from an expert's perspective, as well as testing from the user's perspective.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

The Learning Management System Moodle has been implemented across the academic enterprise at NC State University since 2009. After lengthy testing and analysis, we are learning more about the accessibility issues of Moodle 1.95 and Moodle 2.0 for both students and faculty. The session will discuss the methods used for testing for accessibility and usability, as well as the results of the testing. In addition, how NC State has been dealing with needed changes to the core code will be addressed, as well as ending with a call to action for those currently dealing with Moodle.

Keypoints

  1. How NC State University has conducted usability and accessibility testing of Moodle.
  2. What the results of the testing are.
  3. How NC State has dealt with making changes to core Moodle code.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1
11/18/2010, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

2010 ADA Accessibility Standards – What’s New? What’s Changed?, Rob Gilkerson, DBTAC: Rocky Mountain ADA Center

Session Description

This session will highlight the major changes between the current ADA Standards, the 2010 ADA Standards, and it’s similarity to building codes.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

On the 20th anniversary of the passing of the ADA, the Department of Justice adopted revised 2010 ADA Standards.These standards will now address recreation facilities, play areas, state and local government facilities (detention facilities and courthouses), and are almost identical to 2003 ANSI A117.1 used by most building departments.

Keypoints

  1. 2010 ADA Standards (i.e. 2004 ADA/ABA Guidelines)
  2. 1991 vs. 2010 ADA Standards vs. 2003 ANSI A117.1.
  3. Resources

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1 ADA focused

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 1 0 1 0 1
11/18/2010, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Veterans Resource Center Project, Gaeir Dietrich & Myra Lerch, Consultant, High Tech Center Training Unit

Session Description

This presentation will report on a project to create Veterans Resource Centers (VRCs) on 15 campuses in the California Community College system. Staffed primarily by fellow vets, VRCs include assistive technology and serve to transition returning vets into the community college system.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

In Spring 2008, Butte College established a Veterans Resource Center (VRC), a designated space designed to provide a central entry point for veterans as they navigate the civilian and academic worlds (http://www.butte.edu/services/veterans/vrc.html). Staffed primarily by fellow vets, the overall goal is to deliver tangible tools and services to ease the transition to the community college. In Spring 2009, the High Tech Center Training Unit (HTCTU) at De Anza College—in coordination with the Chancellor’s Office of the California Community Colleges—proposed establishing a Veterans Resource Center (VRC) at fifteen community colleges, patterned after the VRC at Butte College. The VRC pilot sites represent different geographic regions with distinct characteristics (rural and urban). These centers will serve as demonstration projects for two years. A VRC provides services beyond a veterans clubhouse; the three primary components are academics, camaraderie, and wellness. Assistive technology will play a significant role in supporting academic success.

Keypoints

  1. Identify the three central components that distinguish a VRC from a vets lounge or clubhouse
  2. Identify one specific service a VRC can offer in each of the central component areas
  3. Learn data on traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress, and suicide rates among vets from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1 Veterans issues

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1
11/18/2010, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Lecture: Institutionalizing Universal Design for Learning, Jesse Hausler & Craig Spooner, Colorado State University

Session Description

Universal Design for Learning has become an integral component of academic life at Colorado State University by strategically aligning the UDL message with areas of interest for university stakeholders and adopting broad definitions of “accessibility” and “diversity.” This session will highlight multiple approaches used to institutionalize UDL at a research university.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

When discussed in the context of disability and accommodation, UDL often fails to gain traction with higher education faculty and administrators. This occurs despite the fact that UDL promises better outcomes for all learners—those with diverse life experiences, cultural and language backgrounds, and learning styles—not just students with disabilities. There exists a widespread but erroneous perception that there are few students with disabilities on college campuses. As a result, standalone workshops about accessibility and disability accommodation produced little interest and low turnout. A new approach to “marketing” UDL was needed in order to gain institution-wide acceptance and implementation. To achieve that goal, the ACCESS Project is pursuing a range of strategies. This strategy involves embedding UDL principles into existing faculty development content. This is being done by partnering with CSU’s Institute for Learning and Teaching and participating in its widely respected professional development activities.

Keypoints

  1. When discussed in the context of disability and accommodation, UDL often fails to gain traction with higher education faculty and administrators.
  2. UDL promises better outcomes for all learners—those with disabilities, diverse life experiences, cultural and language backgrounds, and learning styles.
  3. A successful strategy to implement UDL methods on a university is to align the UDL message with campus wide teaching and learning initiatives.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1
11/19/2010, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Reconfigured Mobile Android Phone for People who are Blind or Visually Impaired, Mohammed Yeasin, University of Memphis

Session Description

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

The main goal of this research is to develop assistive technology solutions that are expected to facilitate day-to-day activities for people who are blind or visually impaired. Some of these activities include but are not limited to; reading envelopes, letters, medicine bottles, food containers in refrigerators; shopping and browsing; following a map; walking straight and avoiding collisions, crossing traffic intersections; finding references in an open space; education and employment; etc. The key objectives are to develop solutions that are light weight, low cost, un-tethered and have an intuitive and easy to use interface that can be reconfigured to perform a large number of tasks. In an effort towards achieving the above mentioned goals and objectives, a service oriented approach was adopted that enabled reconfiguring a mobile Android phone to provide a “read out loud” service. The Android architecture was used to integrate the cell phone camera, image capturing and analysis routines, on-device implementation of robust and efficient optical character recognition (OCR) engine and text to speech (TTS) engine to develop the proposed application. To illustrate the utility of the fully integrated and Reconfigured Mobile Android Phone (R-MAP), an empirical study was performed under various environments (such as indoor, outdoor, complex background, different surfaces, and different orientations). Preliminary results suggest that the R-MAP is capable of providing a robust, affordable, and portable solution for people who are blind or visually impaired.

Keypoints

  1. Challenges in designing and implementing assistive technology for people who are blind or visually impaired.
  2. System integration issues on mobile platform.
  3. Evaluation of mobile assistive technologies.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
11/19/2010, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Digital Image and Graphic Resources for Accessible Materials: the DIAGRAM Center Project, Betsy Beaumon, Benetech, George Kerscher, The DAISY Consortium

Session Description

The new DIAGRAM Center will develop tools and best practices to create and use accessible images in educational content. Benetech, with the National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM) and the US Fund for DAISY, are running this R&D center and will discuss status and plans six months into operation.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 2004 (IDEA) requires timely access to educational materials; through projects such as Benetech’s Bookshare for Education, access to text has greatly increased. Unfortunately, however, for graphical content the burden of accessible image preparation typically falls on educators, with limited time and tools to create useful descriptions or accessible graphics for students. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), DIAGRAM (Digital Image and Graphic Resources for Accessible Materials) is a research and development center that will transform the processes and availability of accessible images for students with disabilities. Through rigorous research and testing over a five year period, the DIAGRAM center will help create a set of standards-based tools for producers of accessible instructional materials, such as publishers and state and local education agencies, to expand the field of image description and interactive exploration of graphical content.

Keypoints

  1. The DIAGRAM Center will transform the creation and consumption of accessible image and graphic content.
  2. Learn about DIAGRAM’s plans for evaluation, development, testing and dissemination.
  3. What are the findings after the first 6 months of operation?

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1
11/19/2010, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

WordQ & SpeakQ (FREE licenses for all attendees a $298 value), Neil MacGregor, ST4 Learning Inc.

Session Description

Writing and Speech Recognition tools designed to support a wide variety of ages and writing difficulties. Neil has a learning disability, is a learning disability consultant, technology trainer, and The Vice President of ST4 Learning - exclusive national distributors of WordQ and SpeakQ.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

The presentation will be driven by the interests and questions of attendees. The goal is for the attendees to learn and feel competent to use and train others on WordQ and SpeakQ: while providing them the software so they can get started right away. Throughout, Neil will relate his personal and professional experiences as a learning disability coach and an assistive technology trainer to give context to the various ways WordQ and SpeakQ is used by different writers to meet their needs. WordQ software will be introduced and discussed with practical everyday strategies, outlining methods that assist with spelling, grammar, punctuation, proofreading and reading. Integrated into WordQ is SpeakQ, which is designed to augment the familiarity and ease of typing, not to replace it entirely. It has an 'on demand' style of 'speech enabled word prediction' that is easier to learn and use, and the voice training requires no reading.

Keypoints

  1. Exactly how and why an assistive technology tool can improve the quality, quantity and fluency of a writer's work.
  2. How my success to graduate with honors after being 'destined' to fail was facilitated by technology; and I've seen this same process work for thousands of others
  3. Technology doesn't have to be complicated, and it is better if its not. learning can be painless, and enjoyable.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
11/19/2010, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Learning and Social Engagement: speech recognition technology to increase equal access for veterans in higher education, Valerie Haven & Ginny Perelson, University of Massachusetts-Boston

Session Description

UMass Boston, as a member of the international Liberated Learning Consortium, has used speech recognition technology in the classroom with students who are veterans. This presentation will review the benefits for students and instructor and the resource requirements for the institution.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Whether or not a returning veteran has a disability requiring accommodations, he or she has to establish new social roles as part of the return to civilian life, which may include the role of student. This presentation will discuss the results of a research project conducted at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Speech to text technology was employed to capture classroom lecture activity, in order to assist veterans with their pursuit of higher education. The recording and transcription of the lecture was provided to support the social aspects of their learning. Information will be presented on how providing lectures and other class materials in a format which can be viewed outside the learning event helps to reduce social anxiety and improve learner participation, retention, and learning. A demonstration of the speech to text technology will be showcased along with recommendations for use in various educational settings.

Keypoints

  1. Attendees will learn of the benefits to the students and research outcomes of this pilot project.
  2. Attendees will gain an understanding of how using this technology can benefit all learners, not just students with disclosed disabilities.
  3. Attendees will learn about the implementation issues.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 0 1 1 all disabilities

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1
11/17/2010, 8:00 AM-10:00 AM

Effective Communication & the ADA: common questions & solutions for auxiliary aids, interpreting services & alternate formats, Sandy Lahmann, DBTAC: Rocky Mountain ADA Center

Session Description

This session will cover ADA requirements for post-secondary institutions for effective communication with individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, low vision, and speech impaired.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Under the ADA, post-secondary institutions must ensure that communications with individuals with disabilities are as effective as communication with others. In order to provide equal access, postsecondary entities are required to provide auxiliary aids and services that promote effective communication. Examples of auxiliary aids and services include: qualified interpreters, captioning, TTYs, large print materials, Braille materials, and computer software. This session will discuss ADA requirements, and common questions as well as common solutions when providing effective communication.

Keypoints

    1. ADA effective communication requirements
    2. Examples of integrating auxiliary aids
    3. Tools and ADA resources

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
11/17/2010, 8:00 AM-10:00 AM

Lab: Dolphin Easy Converter and Microsoft Word 2007-Alternate Format Production on A Bicycle Built for Two, Julie Balassa, Valencia Community College, Jeff Bazer, Dolphin Computer Access

Session Description

Publisher source files are never student-ready. This presentation is a hands-on overview of how to use Microsoft Word 2007 and Easy Converter to convert a source PDF file to multiple student-ready alternate formats (plain text, Microsoft Word, Large Print, DAISY, MP3, Braille).

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Regardless of the size of our institution and our level of expertise, all of us who are responsible for alternate format are challenged with effectively and efficiently converting raw source files to student-ready alternate formats to satisfy individual access needs and the requirements of the Office of Civil Rights. In this session, we will input a source publisher PDF file into Easy Converter, use the intermediate OCR and MS Word editing options to edit the file using alternate format production best practices, and output the edited material in each available alternate format. Participants will have the opportunity to practice with both Microsoft Word 2007 and Easy Converter under the guidance of an experienced DSS provider/alternate format specialist and of Dolphin staff. Support materials and information will be made available.

Keypoints

  1. Publisher source files must undergo alternate format production to meet student needs and Office of Civil Rights requirements
  2. Best practices of editing a source file using Word 2007
  3. Steps to convert an edited file to multiple student-ready formats using Dolphin Easy Converter

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1
11/19/2010, 8:00 AM-10:00 AM

Lab: Resources for Universal Design in Higher Education: Including All Students, Roger O. Smith & Aura M. Hirschman, Rehabilitation Research Design and Disability Center (2 hrs – ends at 10:00)

Session Description

The ACCESS-ed Website, with its "Virtual Campus", was created as part of a federal demonstration project, and provides strategies and resources for implementing universally designed post-secondary classrooms, curricula, instructional methods, services, websites, media, technology, and more.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

In responding to the call to ensure a quality higher education with access for all students, all campus departments have a share of the responsibility. A conceptual model of how institutions serve the needs of students with disabilities will be presented as the context for the development of a unique website. Universal Design in Education is a method to achieve the goal of an accessible campus by serving the needs of students with a shift from focus on the individual as the problem (or having a problem) to a focus on the environment.; a shift from focus on the individual to focus on a group; and a shift from a few responsible campus staff members to the shared responsibility of all campus staff. Institutions are already compelled by law to eliminate barriers to accessibility in the campus environment. Once barriers are removed, the path is cleared for pro-active access by design for all consumers. Campuses will still need to serve some individuals with unique accommodations, but the application of UDE will decrease the need for expensive individualized applications in many cases. As part of a Demonstration Grant to Ensure That Students with Disabilities Receive a Quality Higher Education, funded largely by the US Department of Education, the ACCESS-ed Website was developed and devoted to the implementation of Universal Design in Higher Education as the method to achieve an accessible campus and reach every student. Thus, the UDE concept, as applied by the Project, is inclusive of post-secondary instruction, but includes the services, informational and instructional media, and the physical environment. The ACCESS-ed Website and the “Virtual Campus” will be demonstrated, including a rich array of resources, strategies, links and tools for faculty, staff, students and administrators to design accessible instruction, websites, services, and more.

Keypoints

  1. How to find resources for campus accessibility with unique searches and features on the ACCESS-ed Website.
  2. The conceptual model of how institutions serve the needs of people with disabilities, the A3 Model, which has driven the development of the ACCESS-ed Website.
  3. A new set of resources devoted to measurement of campus accessibility.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1
11/17/2010, 8:00 AM-10:15 AM

Lab: Dragon NaturallySpeaking: Three Practical Applications, Wink Harner, South Mountain Community College

Session Description

Dragon Naturally Speaking workshop will be divided into three primary focuses: 1) general training for Dragon NaturallySpeaking; 2) new accessibility tools in Dragon NaturallySpeaking using Nuance's new "Speak & See"; and 3) creating macros in DNS to work with MathType.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Learn how easy it is to use Dragon NaturallySpeaking. Learn how to dictate using commands. In this second part of the workshop you will learn how to use the new utilities in Speak & See, including a screen magnifier, a reading and writing support toolbar, a a reading ruler, color overlays, and language learning assistant. In this third part of the workshop you will learn how to create macros to use with Dragon NaturallySpeaking and MathType.

Keypoints

  1. General training on Dragon NaturallySpeaking and learning simple dictation commands. Will come away with good general knowledge of the program and a HOW-TO printout of simple commands.
  2. General training on Dragon NaturallySpeaking utilities in Speak & See and how to incorporate these with several other typical MSW programs to assist students with learning, reading, or language difficulties.
  3. Specific training on creating macros in Dragon Naturally Speaking and how to use DNS with Math Type for creating and editing math.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1
11/19/2010, 8:00 AM-10:15 AM

Lab: Microsoft Office the Screen Reader Way, Andy Leach & Steve Bennett, Dolphin Computer Access Inc. (2.25 hrs – ends at 10:15)

Session Description

A practical but basic introduction to using Microsoft Office without the mouse! Experience Word and Excel entirely through the keyboard, guided only by your favorite voice.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This session aims to be a practical, but beginner’s guide to accessing Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel entirely through the keyboard. No mice allowed! Using a combination of Microsoft hotkeys and SuperNova hot keys, attendees will experience firsthand how blind students navigate the Windows environment and complete their studies. Listening to the trainers instructions, trainees will create a new Word document, navigate the Word 2007 ribbon bar, write a short paragraph of text, adjust the fonts, text alignment and more. Using his many years experience as a screen reader user, the trainer will share tips and tricks to improve trainees' success rate and their overall productivity. During some stages of the session, trainees will turn off their monitor to develop a true appreciation of their student’s learning environment. Turning back on their monitor will reveal their successes and their mistakes.

Keypoints

  1. The very basics of navigating Windows using only the keyboard.
  2. Useful hotkeys to improve student productivity.
  3. An appreciation for the learning environment of a vision impaired student.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
11/17/2010, 9:15 AM-10:15 AM

Networking and Integrating Assistive Technology in the University/College Environment, Dan Comden, University of Washington

Session Description

Networked delivery of AT at the University of Washington will be discussed, including a description of tools and techniques used, problems encountered, and future plans.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Providing AT to university-level students is a problem that has been solved. Unfortunately that provision has often meant segregated settings or standalone workstations. Providing AT on all workstations within a computing facility not only improves access for students with disabilities, it also increases visibility of accessibility issues and topics. This session will provide an overview of methods used to deploy a comprehensive range of AT applications. Feedback and discussion will be encouraged. Time permitting, delivery of AT via virtual computing will be demonstrated.

Keypoints

  1. Descriptions of existing network AT approaches
  2. Common solutions to issues, tools used
  3. Future issues

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0
11/17/2010, 9:15 AM-10:15 AM

Embracing Change for All: Addressing Accessibility in Online Synchronous Teaching Technologies, Lisa Fiedor & Beth Shepherd, NC State University

Session Description

In this session, we will discuss accessibility concerns in innovative synchronous tools such as Elluminate, Abode Connect and Second Life, and introduce features that deal with some of the barriers.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

While using emerging technologies can create a culturally rich learning environment, it can also create unrealized barriers for students with disabilities. Innovative technologies such as Elluminate, Adobe Connect, and Second Life provide unique opportunities for real-time interaction and collaboration between students and faculty, but can leave students with visual, hearing, or mobility disabilities behind. In this session, we’ll discuss accessibility concerns in these synchronous tools and introduce features that deal with some of these barriers. We hope to start a dialogue among faculty, instructional designers, and other support staff that raises awareness of accessibility issues in synchronous technologies. We will provide a copy of our slides and post links to related information.

Keypoints

  1. How emerging technologies are being used in education
  2. What barriers are caused by certain synchronous tools
  3. What features are available that deal with some of these barriers

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 0 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0
11/19/2010, 9:15 AM-10:15 AM

Both sides of the fence: Student and professor perspectives on accessible textbooks, Kyle Slough, East Carolina University, Melissa Engleman, East Carolina University

Session Description

Learn how to access online accessible digital text. Learn the pitfalls students face when they receive various formats of text and how professors can advocate for accessible digital content for their students.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

University professors often assume that their university disability services offices receive accessible texts from publishers in a timely manner. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. Many students must rely on other sources to get digital text, which is not always in an accessible format. Participants will learn how they, as Professors can advocate with publishers for more appropriate textbook materials.

Keypoints

  1. How to access online accessible digital text
  2. Pitfalls of various textbook formats
  3. How professors can advocate for accessible digital content for their students.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1
11/19/2010, 9:15 AM-10:15 AM

Crowd-Sourcing Accessibility: Can Accessibility be fixed for free with Community Help? Terrill Thompson, DO-IT, University of Washington

Session Description

Crowdsourcing is the act of outsourcing tasks (e.g., captioning video, scanning books, adding accessibility to websites) to a large community of volunteers. This session will demonstrate several crowdsourcing tools that can be used to improve accessibility, and will discuss viability for higher ed.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Crowdsourcing is the act of outsourcing tasks to a large community of volunteers. The results of the community’s efforts are typically shared among community members so that all participants benefit and are therefore motivated to continue their involvement. A variety of social accessibility tools apply the crowdsourcing model to solving accessibility problems. For example, there are tools that allow large communities of people to transcribe, caption, translate, and subtitle each others’ videos; and to add accessibility features to otherwise inaccessible web pages; and to share scanned and converted print materials. In today’s tough economic climate, higher education institutions must solve their accessibility problems with dwindling budgets. This session will demonstrate several crowdsourcing tools, and will explore whether they can be a viable part of the accessibility solution for higher education.

Keypoints

  1. A definition of crowdsourcing as it applies to higher education.
  2. What tools are available for crowdsourcing video transcription and captioning.
  3. What tools are available for adding accessibility features to otherwise inaccessible web sites.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 0 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
11/19/2010, 9:15 AM-11:15 AM

From Accessibility Evaluation to Fruitful Collaboration: Elluminate and Accessibility, Hadi Rangin, University of Illinois, Shannon Urban, Elluminate Inc.

Session Description

In this session the members of the Elluminate Accessibility Interest Group will provide their perspectives on how the consortium is improving the accessibility of Elluminate. We will be also demonstrating the latest accessibility features of Elluminate.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Web Conferencing Tools are becoming increasingly popular in the educational, corporate, and in non-profit organizational environments. Web Conferencing Tools are used for online collaboration, presentation, webinar, training, desktop sharing, and include many more features. Unfortunately, the majority of them are not designed with accessibility for people with disabilities in mind and as a result such tools are not accessible to people with these special needs. The University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign tested and evaluated 6 web conferencing tools namely Adobe Connect, Saba Centra, Talking Communities, Wimba, Cisco Meeting Place, and Elluminate. Accessibility evaluation result for each product has been shared with the respective vendors and their hosting colleges/departments . Some vendors including Elluminate realized very quickly the importance of accessibility and dedicated substantial resources to improve the accessibility of their products. Elluminate partnered with the AthenPro Collaboration Group. The collaboration group provided feedback on accessibility issues and improvement suggestions and tested the newly added accessibility features. thanks to this partnertship and collaboration Elluminate has improved the accessibility of their product and is on the way to become more accessible. Please come to this session and learn all about this collaboration group and see the accessibility features of Elluminate.

Keypoints

  1. How to establish an effective collaboration group with other a third-party vendor and other higher educational institutions
  2. How to identify, evaluate, and record accessibility issues
  3. Learn about accessibility features in Elluminate

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1 Everyone

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1
11/19/2010, 10:30 AM-11:30 AM

Lecture: Universal Life: The Use of Virtual Worlds Among People with Disabilities, Kel Smith, Anikto LLC

Session Description

Explore the use of virtual worlds and augmented reality technologies among people with disabilities. This presentation will cover current trends in innovation as they benefit people with cognitive, vision, physiological and hearing impairments.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

With their emphasis on graphics and complex interface controls, it would appear that gaming interfaces, mobile apps and virtual worlds have little to offer people with disabilities. On the contrary, a number of intriguing developments exist within the accessibility sector; these use cases inform the design principles that make barrier-free access an important aspect of the interaction experience. This presentation will cover current trends in digital interaction specific to those with cognitive, physical and developmental disabilities. Examples will include multi-user virtual environments, haptic input devices for the blind, mobile development for the iPhone and iPad platforms, universally designed augmented reality applications, and the ways in which disabled users choose to depict their personae through avatar identities. Although the submitted paper is specific to virtual worlds, the presentation will be expanded to include updated information related to newly emerging forms of interaction.

Keypoints

  1. Understand the use cases surrounding people with disabilities and how they respond to "virtual reality" applications.
  2. Investigate the work being done by technology companies (gaming, mobile and augmented reality) to better accommodate people with disabilities.
  3. Understand and empathize the benefits that virtual online communities offer to people with disabilities.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1 Autism/spectrum disorders

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1
11/19/2010, 10:30 AM-11:30 AM

Accessibility: AT in the Classroom and Beyond, Kara Zirkle & Liz Miller, George Mason University

Session Description

This session will review various assistive technology and services offered at George Mason and how they help students, faculty, and staff, regardless whether or not they may have a disability.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

We have unique communication with students in such that our Office of Disability Services and Assistive Technology Initiative Office collaborate to ensure that students get every accommodation and support possible, as supported by documentation. Examples of services include, but are not limited to: electronic text, technical support for assistive technology, informal AT assessments, AT provided in the classroom and AT on loan on a case by case basis. We provide an assistive technology lab, in each campus library with all the AT software that supported on campus. We also provide discounted software, Premier Technology Literacy Suite, to active Mason ID members that allows for more of a Universal Design approach. This way individuals who may not feel comfortable self disclosing may still have the opportunity to use technology provided on campus. We have also found this software helpful to students with different learning styles or non-native speakers of English.

Keypoints

  1. Examples of how AT serves individuals with cognitive disabilities, hearing, mobility and visual imparimetns
  2. Accessible text production
  3. Options for students in the classroom, on campus and at home, including Universal Design and the importance/affects of Web Accessibility

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1
11/19/2010, 10:30 AM-11:30 AM

Service Plus: One Campus’ Approach to Alternative Text Production, Jeffrey Taylor, Texas Tech University Student Disability Services

Session Description

This session will look at the production of digital textbooks through a customer-service perspective. Issues concerning customer satisfaction, evaluation, and feedback will be considered.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

In the realm of digital text production, the primary focus is on the technical process. In this session, however, the focus will be on the proper evaluation of alternative text production services. It will look at ways to “go the extra mile” for the student (within reason) and how to effectively assess services. I intend to show the evolution of our services through the handouts and forms we provide to students and show how their feedback has helped shape the services they receive.

Keypoints

  1. 1. The ability to assess student satisfaction of the digital text process.
  2. 2. The importance of empathy when considering how to approach student services.
  3. 3. The need to think critically about the way that services are provided.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1
11/19/2010, 10:30 AM-11:30 AM

Templates for Accessible Course Content, Janna Cameron, Desire2Learn, Ken Petri, The Ohio State University Web Accessibility Center

Session Description

Do you want to create accessible course content, but aren’t ready to learn HTML? This presentation will demonstrate how to use HTML templates to create accessible content. We will look specifically at the benefits and successful application of headings, lists, images and tables.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

HTML is one of the most accessible ways to deliver online course content. Unfortunately, some instructors do not use HTML because they are not ready to learn it. Often content is offered as Word or PowerPoint files: both of which can be created faster with more esthetically pleasing results. To address this issue, in late 2009, the Desire2Learn Accessibility Consortium created a number of HTML templates for accessible course content. The goal of this project was to lower the barrier to creating HTML-based course content – with esthetically pleasing results. The result of this activity was a series of six, very attractive content templates, all of which are available under a creative commons license. Each template contains a CSS file, an instructions file and example content. This presentation will explore how to correct apply the content styles to existing content. Specifically, the template will be applied to an existing syllabus. The benefits of the template elements will be described during the presentation. This presentation will end with a brieft demonstration on how to upload the content to a popular Learning Management System

Keypoints

  1. The advantages of HTML for course content presentation
  2. The specific benefits of the template features - such as appropriate, clean markup
  3. How to apply templates to existing course content

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
11/15/2010, 10:30 AM-1:00 PM    (Pre-Conference)

Lab: An Experiential Workshop on Learning Disability: Why Some Students Try Harder, Still Fail and the AT/Accommodations that can Offer Solutions, Sherri Parkins, Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology, Kevin Reinhardt

Session Description

Learning Disabilities impact auditory/visual processing, language, memory, computation, problem solving, attention, organization, motor skills, spatial perceptions and/or social interactions. YOU will experience an LD and then discover why AT, teaching strategies and accommodations fit.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Participants will learn about the four major psychological processes that are impacted by Learning Disabilities. Through a series of experiential activities they will explore how auditory/visual processing, language, memory, computation, problem solving, attention, organization, motor skills, spatial perceptions and/or social interactions are impacted. For a brief period attendees will live in the day-to-day world of a person with a Learning Disability. They will feel the frustration and the anxiety it inflicts. Executive functioning disorders will be explained and examined. After each experience participants will explore various assistive technology solutions. They will also discuss the application of accommodations and strategies and how they can support the needs of all students. Various resources will be shared.

Keypoints

  1. Participants will be able to express how auditory/visual processing, language, memory, computation, problem solving, attention, organization, motor skills, spatial perceptions and/or social interactions are impacted by Learning Disabilities.
  2. Attendees will be able to explain why AT is able to support those whose learning has been affected by a disability involving the 4 major psychological processes
  3. Participants will be able to recommend various strategies that, although presented as supports for persons with LD, enhance the learning experience for all

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 0 1

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1
11/17/2010, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM

Comparing and Evaluating Text-to-Speech Software: Which one is right for your needs? Melissa Engleman & Kyle Slough, East Carolina University

Session Description

Attendees will learn the basics of different text-to-speech programs in a hands-on lab, including Natural Reader, Read:Outloud, Read & Write Gold and Kurzweil. Then they will conduct a guided comparison of the features of each one, using our evaluation protocol.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Many text-to-speech software packages are currently available to those with various accessibility needs. No one package will have all the features required by every user. In our presentation, and in our paper, we present several of the most popular software packages, from low-cost to high-end. Then we present a protocol that we have developed for evaluating the software for individual needs. The software will include Natural Reader, Read:Outloud, Read & Write Gold and Kurzweil. Participants will leave with basic understanding of each program as well as a method for evaluating this type of software in the future.

Keypoints

  1. Basics of 4 different text-to-speech software packages (Natural Reader, Read:Outloud, Read & Write Gold and Kurzweil)
  2. Guided comparison of the features of each package, and for whom it might be appropriate
  3. A method for conducting future evaluations of text-to-speech software

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1
11/18/2010, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM

Exploring the AccessText Network Member-to-Member File Exchange, Bob Martinengo & Kane Stanley, AccessText Network (1.5 hrs – ends at 12:30)

Session Description

The AccessText Network is improving the accessibility of college textbooks. This session will provide an overview of the new member-to-member file exchange that increases the choice and quality of accessible materials available.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

The AccessText Network is improving the accessibility of college textbooks by linking disability service providers directly with the leading academic publishers, enabling the streamlined request and delivery of electronic files for use by students with disabilities. The new member-to-member hosted file exchange enables colleges to share accessible files they have created with other AccessText members with publisher permission. Files are screened for completeness and quality by the AccessText staff and are then stored on a secure server so they are available for download without the contributing school having to respond to each request. Schools that provide files to the exchange will receive a discount on their next year’s AccessText membership fee based on the number of times each file is downloaded by another member. Please attend this session for a full update on the AccessText Network and information on the exciting new file exchange.

Keypoints

  1. Understand the benefits of AccessText membership
  2. Understand the AccessText Member-to-Member Hosted File Exchange
  3. Provide feedback to textbook publishers

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 1 All print-related disabilities

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1
11/17/2010, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

Bookshare’s Adventures in Open Educational Resources, Cherie Miller & Julie Carpenter, Bookshare/Benetech

Session Description

Bookshare is creating the first widely available accessible versions of OER’s (Open Education Resources). This presentation will discuss the challenges encountered, the development of image descriptions and demonstrate a final, converted book.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Given the rise of open educational resources (OERs), Bookshare recognized the need for accessible versions of these books. Bookshare is partnering with Flat World Knowledge to convert their open content business and economics college textbooks to accessible versions and include them in the Bookshare collection. A second project is creating the first accessible versions of open content K-12 digital textbooks. The first books and have images, charts, and complex equations. While aligned with California grades 9-12 standards, they have educational value in introductory college courses. Processes for converting these books will translate to processing postsecondary STEM materials as well. The OER’s have varying file formats which pose many challenges for conversion to accessible formats. The session will discuss those challenges and demonstrate a final converted book. An integral element of accessibility is image descriptions created by a program of university student volunteers. This session will discuss the Bookshare university volunteer program.

Keypoints

  1. OER’s have unique formats. Converting them to DAISY requires unique solutions.
  2. 2. University student volunteers are an invaluable resource for creating accessible media.
  3. 3. The first accessible open educational resources will be available through Bookshare.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 1

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1
11/17/2010, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

Lecture: Magnification & Multiple Monitors - Increase Productivity for Low Vision Students, Steve Bennett, Dolphin Computer Access Inc.

Session Description

An overview of how multiple monitors with side-by-side magnified applications, magnification views, color and other visual settings can increase the productivity of students with low vision. Includes practical tips and advice, as well as brand new screen magnification technology.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This session will deliver a plethora of advice and suggestions on how to increase the productivity of low vision students using a screen magnifier. Viewing a fully magnified screen frequently results in reduced work speed, or the requirement to break more frequently from tired eyes. The speaker will explain magnification views, contrast settings, application settings and advanced magnification features that can increase a student’s speed when creating, reading or editing materials. The speaker will also demonstrate the newest multiple monitor support available in SuperNova (in development at the time of writing) which through ‘true’ extended desktop support with side-by-side applications (one or more on each monitor) will finally enable low vision students to be as productive as their sighted peers. The ability to quickly switch between monitors without the need to pan the magnification away, and a dedicated presentation mode for Microsoft PowerPoint users will further enhance this experience.

Keypoints

  1. An overview of screen magnification settings that can improve student productivity.
  2. An understanding of how multiple monitors can improve student productivity.
  3. Tips on supporting low vision students get the most from their screen magnifier.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
11/17/2010, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

Getting Captioning Started on Campus-- Lessons Learned, Dean Brusnighan, Purdue University

Session Description

Purdue University just completed a one-year, campus-wide project to get video and multimedia captioning started on the West Lafayette campus. I will share lessons I’ve learned from my experiences with this project.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Purdue University just completed a one-year, campus-wide, proof-of-concept project regarding video and multimedia captioning. The project provided captioning in the broad categories of Administrative Video, Academic Video, and Intercollegiate Athletics. I will share lessons I’ve learned from my experiences with this project. • We examined the time and cost to correct YouTube automatic captions files. We compared those values against the time and cost to purchase and correct files from a captioning vendor. • We experimented with providing captions at basketball games using Twitter and CoveritLive. • We successfully implemented captioning in Echo 360 lecture recordings. • Commencement ceremonies at Purdue are telecast on local access cable TV and webcast. Establishing a process to provide captions for both was not as difficult as I feared. • Captions are known to benefit a wide range of individuals, including those learning English as a second language. Purdue’s large community of international students might benefit from captions.

Keypoints

  1. A captioning vendor can be a better solution than alternatives in some cases.
  2. New collaborations to provide captions can come from unexpected places.
  3. There is interest in providing captions to a mobile device during athletic events.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0
11/17/2010, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

SciTrain and SciTrain U: A Continuum of Online Learning for Accessible STEM Education, Robert Todd, Georgia Tech/CATEA

Session Description

Georgia Tech's CATEA has created SciTrain and SciTrain U to provide online training in the creation of accessible STEM courses and labs for secondary and post-secondary teachers. This presentation will explore the design, creation and implementation of the projects, as well as research results.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Georgia Tech’s Center for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access (CATEA) is conducting research and development projects to enhance the capacities of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) teachers to educate students with disabilities, secondary and post-secondary. The projects have conducted online surveys, focus groups, engagement measures and longitudinal studies to discover the training and knowledge needs of teachers. The ongoing research has identified significant gaps in teacher knowledge about students with disabilities and the accommodations that can help them succeed, including Universal Design for Learning. Findings have been used in the creation of accessible, online training courses designed to meet teacher needs in the classroom and laboratory environments. The courses have been designed as complete, integrated training, providing didactic material and resources that teachers can employ in classrooms and laboratories. Ongoing research focuses on the specific needs of post-secondary instructors, including online learning accommodations.

Keypoints

  1. Understanding of the gaps in teacher knowledge for the provision of accessible STEM education.
  2. Knowledge of the effects of accessible STEM education on student academic success, engagement and satisfaction.
  3. Vital considerations in the creation of online tools for teachers who can benefit from UDL and accessible course development.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1
11/18/2010, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

Starting Up an Alternate Format Production System, Robert Beach, Kansas City Kansas Community College

Session Description

This session will explore the evaluations and preparations needed to setup an effective alt format production system.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Setting up an effective alternate format production system requires thought and careful planning. What formats are needed? What tools are needed? Who can do the work? What is the most cost effective procedure/equipment? This session will look at the initial steps to building an alternate format production process. Whether you are starting from scratch or needing to expand your current system, this session can help you develop a structured planning process.

Keypoints

  1. How to determine alternate format needs
  2. How to develop a production process
  3. How to select appropriate tools for the process

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
11/18/2010, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

Enhancing AT Services by Collaborating with an Academic Unit, Marla Roll & Sherri Keller, Colorado State University

Session Description

By aligning AT services with an academic unit that provides pre-service training, campuses and AT service providers create a mutually beneficial partnership.    Benefits include more comprehensive AT services, as well as an increased capacity to pursue grant  funding, and research related to AT.    The academic unit benefits from in-depth personnel preparation of its graduates.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This session presents one model for assistive technology service delivery in a University setting.   The Assistive Technology Resource Center at Colorado State University is located in the Department of Occupational Therapy, housed in the College of Applied Human Sciences. This partnership with an academic unit provides benefits for both the ATRC’s service delivery and to the educational opportunities of students studying to become registered Occupational Therapists. Graduate students under the guidance of registered OT’s provide services to students and employees with disabilities.  Complete assistive technology evaluations and training sessions are provided, using well established occupational therapy models that are evidence based in nature.

The academic department benefits through the inclusion of in-house expertise regarding pre-service training in the concepts and practices related to assistive technology.  Collaboration with the academic unit also allows for interdisciplinary submission of grant and foundation proposals and opportunities for manuscript development and publication.

Keypoints

  1. Examination of a model that aligns an AT service office with an academic unit.
  2. Benefits to the users of AT in a university setting (as a result of that model).
  3. Benefits to students studying human services professions ( as a result of that model).

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 0 0 0 All disabilities

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
11/18/2010, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

Current R&D at the NTID Center on Access Technology, E. William Clymer, National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Session Description

This presentation will provide an update on the research and development activities being conducted within the Center on Access Technology (CAT) at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT).

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

The NTID Center on Access Technology is charged to investigate, evaluate, and report on the most effective and efficient use of access technologies and train individuals in their use in order to accelerate the widespread implementation of best practices within deaf education at the postsecondary level. The Center is focusing its efforts on technologies that have a high likelihood of improving access to postsecondary educational opportunities for deaf students within the next several years. Based on a previous needs assessment, four areas of focus were identified. These strands include: Classroom Access Technologies, Mobile Technologies, Audio and Sound Technologies of Interest to Hard-of-Hearing Persons, and Training and Evaluation Services. Various projects and initiatives within the above strands will be described, as will the results of a planning grant to investigate the creation of a virtual support network for deaf/hard-of-hearing college students around the country enrolled in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs.

Keypoints

  1. List the NTID priorities for research and development in access technologies.
  2. Describe how emerging support technologies could be utilized at local postsecondary orgnaizations
  3. List the challenges associated with providing academic and social support for deaf students enrolled at major scientific universities.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 0 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1
11/18/2010, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

How to Conduct an ADA Facility Audit, Rob Gilkerson, DBTAC: Rocky Mountain ADA Center

Session Description

This session will allow participants to know what to look for during accessibility surveys of their facilities by identify common errors and their possible solutions.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This is a practical "how to" session that will take you through the process of conducting an ADA accessibility audit in an existing facility. Rob will also explain the difference between the program access requirements for public educational entities and readily achievable barrier removal required for private educational entities. This training is a must-have for anyone responsible for physical barrier removal and those who want their facility truly accessible to everyone.

Keypoints

  1. Common Access Issues & Solutions
  2. Program Access vs. Readily Achievable Barrier Removal
  3. Resources & Tools

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1 ADA focused

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1 1
11/19/2010, 11:45 AM-12:45 PM

4 Tips For Integrating Web Accessibility Standards into the Drupal Content Management System, Cousett Ruelas, St. Edward's University

Session Description

This session will evaluate how well Drupal supports the creation of accessible web content amongst authors by looking at the Web Accessibility of the tool's output, of the tool's interface and the ease with which authors can create accessible content.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Many times Web Accessibility is considered an additional option or an after thought. Web Accessibility needs to be a best practice and a combined responsibility of all individuals contributing to the site from the designer, to the coder, to the writer, to the themer, and seen as a benefit to the client and all users. Fortunately, Drupal has a solid foundation for coding standards and separating its data, logic, and presentation separate from each other. This has greatly contributed to the ease in which to make a Drupal site accessible. But is it enough and could it be better? This session will evaluate how well Drupal supports the creation of accessible web content amongst authors by looking at the Web Accessibility of the tool's output, of the tool's interface and the ease with which authors can create accessible content.

Keypoints

  1. Drupal & Web Accessibility Guidelines
  2. Themes with Web Accessibility in Mind
  3. Modules Supporting Web Accessibility

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
11/19/2010, 11:45 AM-12:45 PM

Screen Reader Basics, Parker Owens, Eastern Kentucky University

Session Description

In this session we will cover the basics of text to speech and how it differs from voice recognition. Explain the variety of users for three commercial screen readers: Read and Write Gold, Window Eyes, and Zoomtext.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

In this session we will cover the basics of text to speech and how it differs from voice recognition. *Demo of voice recognition *Demo of text to speech *Discussion of hardware and software setup Three commercial software packages will be featured that vary in audience: Zoomtext for users with low vision; *demo of mouse, pointer, variations, zoom controls, reader functions Read and Write Gold for users with learning disabilities; *demo of read out loud function, daisy reader demo, ocr capabilities and Window Eyes for users with no vision. *explain basic setup of program, explain menu basics We will also look at free tools that can be added to Mozilla Firefox to help with reading while on the internet. The following tools: *magnifiers, zoom, read out loud, tidyread, highlighter, and others.

Keypoints

  1. Understand the difference between screen readers and voice recognition.
  2. Understand the difference between screen readers for users with low vision, users who are blind, and users with learning disabilities.
  3. Learn about free solutions as well as commercial products.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0
11/19/2010, 11:45 AM-12:45 PM

Lecture: PDF to MP3 in Seconds – Done! Steve Bennett, Dolphin Computer Access Inc

Session Description

Learn the simple stages to convert an inaccessible PDF into MP3 audio using a single software tool. Perfect for beginners or experts.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Attendees will follow and learn the simple stages involved in converting a real life inaccessible PDF into a fully accessible and portable MP3. Using a single software tool, EasyConverter, the audience will walk through the step by step stages, from inputting the PDF through to adding synthesised narration. The audience will learn how to develop single or multiple MP3s for larger books, as well as how to select the user's preferred voice synthesizer, then configuring the speed and pitch to suit. Using the in built lexicon facility, the audience will be showed how commonly mispronounced words can be trained to deliver correct pronunciation, ensuring the highest quality audio. The newly created MP3 edition of the learning material can then be saved to an MP3 player, burnt to CD or shared via the college Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Keypoints

  1. How to use EasyConverter to process and inaccessible PDF document.
  2. Create high quality MP3 learning materials.
  3. Using a lexicon to ensure correct pronunciation.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
11/19/2010, 11:45 AM-12:45 PM

Keep Moving Accessibility Forward, Kevin Price, University of Illinois Chicago, Janet Peters, Great Lakes ADA Center

Session Description

This session is an examination of the process at University of Illinois - Chicago has undergone to implement website accessibility on its campus, in accordance with the Illinois Information Technology Accessibility Act of 2007.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

The World Wide Web has opened the world with many wonderful benefits for people with disabilities, but if the websites are not constructed with accessibility in mind, these opportunities may be lost for people using assistive technology or interacting with the website in a different manner. This session is an examination of the process at University of Illinois - Chicago has undergone to implement website accessibility on its campus, in accordance with the Illinois Information Technology Accessibility Act of 2007.

Keypoints

  1. Learn about successful and less successful approaches to implementing web accessibility campus wide.
  2. Learn about organizing and implementing campus awareness through Expo events
  3. Understand key technical elements and priorities beyond websites, such as PDF documents

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
11/19/2010, 11:45 AM-12:45 PM

Captioning Guidelines: Making Smart Decisions in Difficult Times, Jean Wells, California State University Chancellor's Office

Session Description

If you don't have the resources to caption everything, how do you prioritize and decide on what gets captioned? The ATI of the CSU developed Guidelines for CSU campuses in order to assess the critical factors necessary in making decisions, policies, and procedures.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

The rapid growth of audio and video used for instruction, public relations, training and live events, not to mention the vast amount of media in libraries, poses a difficult situation for campuses with dwindling resources for captioning. The CSU campuses requested Guidelines be written on how to prioritize media for captioning. Campus members and the ATI worked together to develop guidelines that are being tested and used to create new policy in this area. The guidelines evolved from asking "Smart Questions". You will learn about the questions, the guidelines, and ways you can take this into your own community.

Keypoints

  1. Attendees will learn to ask "Smart Questions" about captioning media.
  2. Attendees will learn how to prioritize captioning needs based on presented guidelines.
  3. Attendees will practice making decisions based on these guidelines.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1
11/17/2010, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM

Technology for Learning: How an Assistive Technology Course Can Help All Students, Shawn Foster, Southern Oregon University

Session Description

Southern Oregon University created a course to teach all students how to benefit from broadly available assistive technology tools. Learn how to implement this type of course on your own campus to destigmatize AT, increase word of mouth about its availability, and increase success and retention.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Many students with disabilities coming into postsecondary education have no exposure to what AT tools are available, let alone how they could benefit from them. Other populations, such as underprepared students, adults returning to postsecondary education, and English language learners, often are unaware of the tools that could help them with the unique challenges that they face in education. In this presentation, learn how a universal design approach created a for-credit course that teaches all students to identify areas where technology can be helpful to them and create a plan for obtaining and learning to use these tools. You may find a few free and inexpensive tools you didn't know about before! Before you leave, you'll take the principles, strategies, and tools presented and create an action plan for your campus to create such a course for yourself or incorporate into an existing course.

Keypoints

  1. How a technology for learning course can benefit all students and destigmatize AT for students with disabilities
  2. Principles, strategies, and tools for creating a universally designed course in technology for learning
  3. Leave with an action plan for implementation of the ideas presented

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1
11/17/2010, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM

From the Trenches: A Practical Approach to Building the Accessible Web, Jon Reid & Aaron Congleton, EffectiveUI

Session Description

This session takes a practical look at the day-to-day requirements of designing and developing accessible Web applications. From regulatory compliance to specific design techniques, Jon Reid and Aaron Congleton will share best practices and success stories for creating the accessible Web.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Creating accessible Web applications entails more than just checking off a list of requirements. True accessibility results from keeping accessibility needs in mind from concept through completion of the project. This session takes a practical look at the day-to-day requirements of designing and developing accessible Web applications including standards, semantics and advanced design and development techniques. From regulatory compliance to design practices to auditing and testing, Jon Reid and Aaron Congleton will share best practices and success stories for navigating the process of creating accessible Web applications from start to finish.

Keypoints

  1. How to facilitate collaboration between development and design for creating accessible web applications
  2. Specific techniques for presenting content to everyone according to their abilities
  3. Best practices for accessibility auditing, documentation and testing

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 0 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1
11/18/2010, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM

Alternative Formats for Learning Disabled Students - Why? Jeff Bazer, Dolphin Computer Access Inc.

Session Description

A practical insight into the benefits of alternative formats for students with learning disabilities or dyslexic, as well as the software and hardware tools used to create and deliver them. The session will specifically look at MP3s, DAISY and accessible eBook formats.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This session will offer a practical insight into the benefits of learning disabled and dyslexic students accessing alternative format information. It will exam MP3, DAISY and accessible ebook formats, weighing up the advantages and disadvantages. The speaker will highlight how each of the formats can better suit specific learning differences, different curriculum content and student learning styles. The session will examine the software used to create MP3, DAISY and accessible ebooks, as well as the software, hardware tools and college processes that can deliver them to the students. The session will draw on real life case study examples showing how the provision of alternative formats has enriched the learning experiences of those students. It will also explain the case study from the college’s perspective on creation, adoption and support.

Keypoints

  1. The learning benefits for LD & dyslexic students of MP3, DAISY and accessible eBooks.
  2. How to create, deliver and disseminate altformats to students.
  3. What constitutes high quality MP3 alternative format learning materials.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
11/17/2010, 2:15 PM-4:15 PM

Lab: Take Note of OneNote! Notetaking, Organization, Collaboration and Beyond! Sherri Parkins & Kevin Reinhardt, Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology

Session Description

Do your clients/students struggle with organization, note taking, unruly paper piles? Does Time Management never happen? Take note of OneNote and come learn how it supports time management, paper organization, note taking and beyond!

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

If you have Microsoft Office 2007 you have OneNote! What is OneNote? OneNote is a computer note taking system with lots of features! OneNote allows a user to record lectures and meetings and take notes. Later they can go back and edit their notes by listening to what they recorded. Appointments, To-Do Lists, etc. can be managed through OneNote and they will synchronize to Outlook. Academic activities and planning tools are integrated in the OneNote system. A student can highlight or "tag" articles and produce summary notes. The electronic notebooks can be used to organize and manage files pertinent to a particular topic or subject. Colleagues and students can collaborate, edit, and share while using OneNote both in real time and thorough e-mail. There is even a way to do calculations and brainstorm! This experiential workshop will allow you to really take note of OneNote!

Keypoints

  1. Participants will be able to create Notebooks; add sections to Notebooks; use templates to customize a Notebook for academic, work and personal use; and insert PowerPoints as note taking guides.
  2. Attendees will learn how to record and have recordings synchronize to their note taking efforts. Participants will know how to use features to support research, summarize information, and utilize the time management tools to organize.
  3. Participants will be able to collaborate with others using the Live Sharing feature.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 0 1

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0
11/17/2010, 2:15 PM-4:15 PM

Introduction to Dragon NaturallySpeaking ver. 10, Denice Roberts, Assistive Technology Partners

Session Description

This is a demonstration of Dragon NaturallySpeaking version 10. The demonstration will include basic steps such as creating a voice file, to more advanced commands to search the Internet.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This is a demonstration of Dragon NaturallySpeaking version 10. Individuals with physical or learning disabilities and individuals with repetitive stress injuries can benefit from using Dragon NaturallySpeaking to type on a computer. Dragon NaturallySpeaking can also improve communication skills through repetition: pronunciation, articulate and enunciation. Using Dragon NaturallySpeaking can be three times faster than typing. Using Dragon NaturallySpeaking there are no spelling errors, only an occasional misrecognition. Very little training is usually required. The choice of microphone depends on the physical setting. The microphone provided with Dragon NaturallySpeaking can be used in a quiet setting; a noise canceling microphone will be necessary in a noisier setting. The demonstration will include basic steps such as creating a voice file, dictating a memo, and correcting an existing document. The new commands of Dragon NaturallySpeaking version will be 10 will also be demonstrated including dictating emails and searching the Internet.

Keypoints

  1. How to create a voice file and start dictating.
  2. How to correct misreconizations.
  3. How to search the Internet.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
11/17/2010, 2:15 PM-4:15 PM

Sourcing DAISY Books and eBooks the Accessible Way – Using Dolphin Publisher and other Tools, Robert Beach, Kansas City Kansas Community College, Jeff Bazer, Dolphin Computer Access Inc.

Session Description

Dolphin Publisher is one solution for generating full-text/full-audio DAISY books. Come see how it is used in the alternate format production system at KCKCC.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Dolphin Publisher is a full-featured DAISY publishing tool. This session will demonstrate how well structured source documents are pulled into Publisher to generate completely usable, full-text/full-audio DAISY books.

Keypoints

  1. Elements of a well structured document
  2. Advantages of a DAISY book with both text and audio

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
11/17/2010, 2:15 PM-4:15 PM

Developing Student Leaders in the ADA: ADA Requirements for Postsecondary Institutions and Empowering Students with Disabilities, Sandy Lahmann, DBTAC: Rocky Mountain ADA Center

Session Description

This session will include ADA requirements for postsecondary institutions and strategies for training and empowering students with disabilities utilizing the ADA.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Postsecondary students with disabilities are often misinformed regarding their rights and responsibilities under the ADA. This lack of understanding can lead to problems for the student and their higher education institution. Training the student in the ADA is a first step. However, empowering the student to become an ADA leader will create a climate of empowerment, energy, and cooperation. This session will cover the ADA requirements for postsecondary institutions including preadmission issues, documentation, reasonable modifications, exclusions, the differences between IDEA and ADA and the accompanying transition issues, service animals, and effective communication. In addition, we will discuss the importance of training students in the ADA and empowering them to become ADA leaders.

Keypoints

  1. ADA requirements for post-secondary institutions
  2. IDEA vs. ADA and transition considerations
  3. Tools & ADA resources

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1 ADA focused

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1 1
11/18/2010, 2:15 PM-4:15 PM

Real Numbers and the Implications for Higher Education - The Prevalence of Disability on Campus, Aura Hirschman & Roger O. Smith, Rehabilitation Research Design and Disability Center

Session Description

An analysis of students in a large Midwestern public university revealed actual statistical data on the prevalence of students with functional impairments. Learn how the study was conducted and some significant results.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

An analysis of students in a large Midwestern public university revealed actual statistical data on the prevalence of students with functional impairments. Most current statistics show small percentages (2-8%) of students on a campus register as having disabilities in order to receive accommodations. Whereas estimates are the norm, this new data documents that the total number of students with disabilities is more than twice this percentage. Significant differences were found regarding at least one indicator of student retention. Replication and more student data have the potential to influence policy change toward welcoming and more inclusive campuses.

Keypoints

  1. Methodology for researching prevalence of disability on campus.
  2. Numbers of students with disabilities on campuses exceeds the estimates once presumed.
  3. Implications for post-secondary education administrators and staff regarding the inclusion of students with disabilities.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1
11/18/2010, 2:15 PM-4:15 PM

Lab: Read & Write Gold 9, a Multi-Tool to Fit Any Hand, Robert Beach, Kansas City Kansas Community College, Gaeir Dietrich, HTCTU

Session Description

Read&Write Gold is a powerful tool with many features and possibilities. This hands-on session will discuss and demonstrate what R&W can do.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Read&Write Gold 9 is a powerful, multi-function tool. While initially designed for individuals with learning disabilities, it now has features that make it practical for nearly any user. This session will discuss the various deployment options for R&W. Many of the R&W tools will be demonstrated and participants will have a chance to try each one.

Keypoints

  1. Read&Write Gold 9 has many powerful tools that are of benefit to all users, not just individuals with disabilities.
  2. Read&Write Gold 9 has several deployment options that fit well for most situations.
  3. Read&Write gold is extremely customizable to match individuals' different needs.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
11/18/2010, 2:15 PM-4:15 PM

The Americans with Disabilities Act: State & Local Governments (Title II) Requirements, Pat Going, DBTAC: Rocky Mountain ADA Center

Session Description

This session will provide an overview of the Title II requirements applicable to state and local governmental entities which includes state funded educational programs. Assorted handouts and other resources will be highlighted and available to participants. Questions about the ADA and related concerns of the participants will be addressed.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

ADA & Title II: This session will examine the specific requirements of state and local government entities under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Topics will include: self-evaluation and transition plans; duties and importance of a designated ADA Coordinator; grievance procedures; and requirements for effective communication. This session is a “must-have” for any Title II entity concerned that they are meeting their responsibilities under this federal civil rights law.

Keypoints

  1. Self-evaluation and transition plans
  2. Designated ADA coordinator
  3. Requirements of state & local government entities to provide program access

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1 ADA focused

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1
11/18/2010, 2:15 PM-4:15 PM

Newbies Guide to Low Tech Accessibility, Wink Harner, South Mountain Community College

Session Description

Presentation will focus on low tech/low to no cost solutions to several common accessibility needs. Good for the newbies in the field who need some quick and easy solutions.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Included in the presentation will be practical, how-to set ups for accessibility attributes in MS Office, settings through the control panel, freeware and free downloads from a variety of sources (links for downloads will be provided), easy to provide right off the bat and easy on the pocketbook for students! Will include time for brainstorming and sharing resources.

Keypoints

  1. How to access built-in accessibility features in IBM platforms and w/i MS Office suite.
  2. How to identify resources online for free or low-cost download.
  3. How to brainstorm solutions for student limitations with existing technology.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1
11/18/2010, 2:15 PM-4:30 PM

Finding the Unique Combination of SuperNova's Speech, Magnification, Color & Braille Settings for your Low Vision and Blind Students, Andy Leach & Steve Bennett, Dolphin Computer Access Inc. (2.25 hrs – ends at 4:30 p.m.)

Session Description

Tips and tricks on supporting low vision and blind students to find their unique combination of screen reader, magnifier and Braille settings. A practical exercise working with the requirements of 2 case study students.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This session will share tips and tricks on supporting low vision and blind students to find their unique combination of speech, magnification, Braille, color and voices settings. Using various methods including the SuperNova Setup Wizard, the trainer will talk attendees through how to navigate the easy-to-use but extensive SuperNova feature set. Focussing on identifying the specific needs of two case study students, the attendees will trial the seven magnifier views including split screen, magnifying glass and resizing glass; create a bespoke color scheme, select highlight and mouse colors to suit, as well as configure the voice, verbosity, and echo settings. Further more advanced settings will be chosen according to their specific student’s requirements. Trainees will then be shown how to create ‘application settings’ to deliver a different set of optimum settings for a specific application, experiencing how they are instantly delivered with that application.

Keypoints

  1. Experiencing the core speech, magnification and Braille settings.
  2. Configuring SuperNova to meet the requirements of a vision impaired student.
  3. How to create unique settings for specific applications.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
11/15/2010, 2:30 PM-5:00 PM   (Pre-Conference)

Lab: Alternative Formats 101 - the Basics, Jeff Bazer &, Steve Bennett, Dolphin Computer Access Inc.

Session Description

A beginner’s guide to the types of alternative formats and their suitability to students with various disabilities . Walking attendees through the basics, attendees will create eBooks, Braille, large print and MP3 learning materials.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This 3 hour lab will introduce the very basics of alternative formats. Initially defining what constitutes high quality; attendees will handle and experience large print, MP3, Braille and accessible eBook format learning materials. Attendees will be encouraged to notice the different learning experience each of the formats delivers and how the different advantages will suit students with different disabilities. Working with the requirements of a fictional case study student and some real life education materials, attendees will then be walked through the complete creation process. Students will generate their own alternative formats, carefully navigating the basic decision making involved in creating bespoke formats. The session will then examine their newly created formats against the quality standards identified at the beginning of the session, also asking ‘does this alternative formats meet the requirements of my fictional student?’ Attendees will close the session by discussing creation tips, legislative compliance, and timely delivery.

Keypoints

  1. What are alternative formats and what constitutes high quality?
  2. The advantages of the various alternative formats.
  3. The basics on how to create alternative formats.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
11/17/2010, 3:30 PM-4:30 PM

Roles and Responsibilities, Who is Really Responsible for Accessibility and How Can We Help? Kara Zirkle & Liz Miller, George Mason University

Session Description

This presentation explains the way the Assistive Technology Initiative at George Mason University breaks down Accessibility, and the roles and responsibilities throughout campus. Who is responsible for what and how it can be a group effort to get things completed.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Our office is able to provide various services such as computer, AT and ergonomic assessments, alternative text formats, web and document accessibility, multimedia and our beginning process for Universal Design. We have been successful by partnering with other Mason offices to build stronger bonds throughout campus. The major question that is asked during trainings, awareness events, etc. is “Who is responsible?”, “What role do I play?”, “I don’t work with or know anyone who has a disability, why is this important to me?” This is a breakdown answering these various questions from the Provost Office to a faculty, staff or student.

Keypoints

  1. Review the different disabilities and explain common barriers and possible solutions
  2. Break down responsibilities between developers, content managers, directors, administration offices, etc.
  3. Give examples and resources to help those who make an effort to add accessibility into their work plan

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
11/16/2010, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM   (Pre-Conference)

Lecture: Accessible Content with Word and PowerPoint 2010, Karen McCall, Karlen Communications

Session Description

This session will provide an overview of how to work with accessible content in Word and PowerPoint 2010. Topics include the Accesibility Checker, choosing which document parts to use in a document and developing a strategy for identifying ehich document parts touse in various situations.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Microsoft Office 2010 now includes an accessibility checker and an acronym manager. These are two of the useful tools at your fingertips to help create and work with more accessible content in PowerPoint, Word and Excel. While there are document parts in both Word and PowerPoint that are accessible to people using adaptive technology the accessibility often depends on how the document is going to be distributed. By knowing which document parts are accessible under which distribution type document authors can make better choices in creating their documents. This session is framed within the Chapter 5 standards of the Section 508 Refresh.

Keypoints

  1. Identify the distribution method for doucments and how this impacts document creation.
  2. Examine the accessible document parts and how to use them effectively.
  3. Mapping accessible documents to Chapter 5 of the SEction 508 refresh.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 0 0 1 All

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
11/19/2010, 9:15 AM-10:15 AM

Creating Accessible Audio and Video Presentations Using LecShare, Norm Coombs, EASI

Session Description

LecShare is already known as a wizard that will transform a PowerPoint creation into accessible Web content. This presentation will demonstrate how to enhance that Web output by adding audio or how to change into an accessible video. "

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

LecShare is already known as a wizard that will transform a PowerPoint creation into a more accessible Web content. Two of its other features will permit the presenter to add audio to the presentation and provides an option to output it in several video formats. The audio-enhanced output gives the user good control of the presentation making it an ideal study tool. The audio is played by using the play button and can be repeated as frequently as is needed. The user can move to the next slide or back up to meet his/her learning style. In contrast, the video versions permits a more relaxed approach to the content for a student wanting a quick review. Both versions will permit putting the text of audio content into the speaker notes. "

Keypoints

  1. LecShare is a richer tool than many people realize
  2. Slides with audio that enables the user to control how it is used is suited to different learning styles
  3. Captioning can readily be provided as speaker notes

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1
11/19/2010, 10:30:00 AM-11:30:00 AM

Lecture: Assistive Technology in Mexico: Making the Impossible Possible, Marisol Miranda, EASI

Session Description

Our attitude, courage and hopes can impact other people lives.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Sometimes we have to do things because we don’t have other choices. This is the case of the teacher that we are going to talk about on our presentation. She is a psychologist, and was named principal of a public school for children with disabilities on a poor town located an hour drive from Mexico City. After leaving her fears apart, she started studying about assistive technologies and low tech; things started changing for her and her students. The impact of her actions where beyond her expectations.

Keypoints

  1. Having a positive attitude is contagious
  2. Assistive technologies can be done at low cost
  3. When the resources are scarce, creativity is the key

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
11/15/2010, 10:30:00 AM-5:00:00 PM   (Pre-Conference)

Lab: Working with Tagged PDF Documents, Karen McCall, Karlen Communications

Session Description

Learn how to create and work with tagged PDF documents using various applications such as Microsoft Office and desktop publishing software. Bring your PDF problem documents and questions to work with in this hands-on and demonstration workshop.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This pre-conference session assumes that you are working with tagged PDF documents and need answers to real life and real time solutions for "wonky" content. The emphasis is on your documents and your questions.The content for the workshop is based on "Accessible and Usable PDF Documents: Techniques for Document Authors Second Edition" by Karen McCall. Topics covered include Office 2007annd 2010, PDF fron ImDesign, scanned PdF documents and legacy PDF documents. The repiar tools available in Acrobat will be identified and explored in context with repairs. Techniques for dealing with problematic document

Keypoints

  1. What can go wrong when converting Office docs to tagged PDF.
  2. How to make repairs in tagged documents.
  3. How to identify problematic document elements/Tags.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 0 0 1 All

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
11/19/2010, 11:45 AM-12:45 PM

Lecture: Progress in Accessible Information Technology in Brazil, Lucy Gruenwald, LBG Serviços de Informatica Ltda. (EASI Session)

Session Description

Major social transformations are happing in Brazil where information technology plays an important role. This presentation will show a view of the challenges in Brazil concerning the use of assistive technologies to ensure equal rights and opportunities for all, including those with disability.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

"it is known about the benefits of using assistive technologies and accessible media, not only for people with disability but also for elderly and for people with low education. According to the 2000 Brazilian Census there are approximately 54 million people in Brazil in these conditions - a number that cannot be neglected. Despite the efforts of recent years to provide equal access for this part of population, there are still great social and technological challenges to be overcome, for example: • Shortage of solution to the Portuguese language ( mainly products for speech recognition), • Shortage literature about accessibility translate to Portuguese, • High cost to import assistive technology, • Shortage of information about the possibility that people with disability can use computer! • Shortage of any support for students with disability in higher education. "

Keypoints

  1. Including accessibility issues in all social projects is very important for developing countries.
  2. Need for technological solutions for languages other than English.
  3. Develop projects to disseminate the concepts of digital accessibility, mainly for the educational area, is crucial.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
11/18/2010, 8::00 AM-9:00 AM

Lecture:Captioning Videos for YouTube is Easy Now, Marisol Miranda & Beth Coombs, EASI

Session Description

Creating accessible videos for YouTube is important,  and Youtube has a simple captioning tool that does much of the work. The presentation will demonstrate how to edit these captions when makes errors in the text.

 

Expertise Level: Beginner

Abstract

Nowadays, social media plays an important role on society. YouTube is the most important resource for sharing videos. These videos are used for different things including education, and they are inaccessible for those who are deaf or hard of hearing and for those who are blind or low vision.  Making them accessible is not complicated, when you have the necessary knowledge and tools. YouTube has some user friendly tools for captioning videos for us to use. On our presentation, we will cover all these topics and show you how to do it.

Keypoints

  1. How to upload a video into YouTube.
  2. YouTube accessibility issues.
  3. Captioning the videos using the tools that YouTube provide.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1
11/18/2010, 3::30 PM-4:30 PM

Hands-on workshop of the Intel Reader, Cleon Wellington, M Ed, MS, Intel Corp.

Session Description

This session will demonstrate the Intel® Reader, a mobile handheld device which takes pictures of printed text and reads it back to the user through its speaker or ear phones. A number of Intel Readers willl be available for hands-on tryout during the session.

 

Expertise Level: Beginner

Abstract

The Intel® Reader is as assistive technology device that helps students become more independent and can help to reduce the amount of time teachers spend preparing accessible instructional materials. A mobile handheld device, theIntel Reader takes pictures of printed text and reads it back to the user through its speaker or ear phones. In this session, you will learn how to use the device to convert printed text to DAISY, MP3, JPEG and TXT files, and how to export them to a PC or MP3 player. You will also learn how to use the Intel® Portable Capture Station to make it easier to capture and store large amounts of text such as a text book.

Learn more at reader.intel.com

Keypoints

  1. Gain valuable hands-on experience using the Intel Reader, a mobile, handheld device for people with reading-based learning disabilities.
  2. Learn how to use the Intel Portable Capture Station to make it easier to capture and store large amounts of text.
  3. Learn how the Intel Reader helps to reduce prep time for accessible instructional materials.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Access Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resources Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0