Session Descriptions

Note: This list is not in any particular order. To review the sessions in chronological order go to the Pre-conference Agenda or the Main Conference Agenda and select any title to view the session description.

Select the embedded title link or adjacent "View in Schedule" link to view the session in the schedule.

Creating Accessible Word and PowerPoint Documents, Karen McCall, Karlen Communications

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Session Description

Spend the day learning about creating accessible Word and PowerPoint documents. What parts of a Word or PowerPoint document are accessible? When are they accessible and how can you convert these documents to accessible PdF with little or no repairs? Come to the hands-on workshop!

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Document authors want to know how to make a more accessible Word or PowerPoint document. This hands-on workshop guides you through the accessible and inaccessible parts of these types of documents. Bring a storage device because you'll create your own document to take away and examine later! This workshop answers the question of what type of content to use in a Word or PowerPoint document and when is that type of content accessible or not accessible. Topics include headings, lists, tables, Alt Text, captions and what happens when these documents are converted to tagged PDF! Bring your questions and samples!

Keypoints

  1. How to add document structure in Word or PowerPoint documents.
  2. What parts of a Word or PowerPoint document are not accessible and why.
  3. The types of repairs would need to be done, if any, once a Word or PowerPoint document is converted to tagged PDF.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 0 0 1 All

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1

Working with Accessible PDF Documents, Karen McCall, Karlen Communications

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Session Description

This hands-on workshop will give you experience using the repair tools available to you in Adobe Acrobat as well as demonstrating repair techniques for simple and complex repairs. Bring a storage device and sample documents if you have them. We'll look at three types of PDF documents: untagged, Tagged and scanned.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This hands-on workshop leverages what you know about accessible document design and provides techniques on how to apply that knowledge to PDF documents to optimize their accessibility. We'll work on actual documents and apply repairs. During the workshop we'll explore the over 17 tools that are available to you to repair PDF documents and when to use them and on what types of content. The documents used will range from simple untagged, unstructured word processor based PDF to PDF documents coming from desktop publishing tools or that were scanned into Acrobat. Note: Some of the repairs require the use of a mouse and have no keyboard access. This doesn't mean that you shouldn't attend the workshop. Knowledge is key in creating policy and helping others understand issues.

Keypoints

  1. Identify the tools in Adobe Acrobat that can be used to repair documents for accessibility.
  2. The common and more advanced techniques you can use to repair PDF documents for accessibility.
  3. What types of documents cannot be made accessible and what solutions can be provided.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 0 0 1 All

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1

Building the next generation of accessible web sites with ARIA and HTML5, Kathy Wahlbin,* Interactive Accessibility

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*(Kathy Wahlin has replaced Todd Kloots from Yahoo! as the speaker for this session).

Session Description

Web development strategies are changing as companies move towards native and web applications; it's no longer sufficient to rely on basic HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. This presentation shows developers how they can begin using HTML5 and ARIA to build future applications.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

The web is evolving from a browser/document-based experience to a desktop-like application accessed on multiple devices. HTML5, the latest version of the HTML specification, and ARIA, Accessible Rich Internet Applications, provide the semantic hooks for engineers to develop these rich applications while maintaining accessibility. This workshop introduces these tools, how to use them to provide accessible solutions, and looks towards the future with examples for building more complex applications.

Keypoints

  1. How HTML5can help, and hinder, accessibility.
  2. How to use ARIA to fix many of the common accessibility problems on the internet.
  3. How to control keyboard navigation and focus with ARIA.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 0 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1
start

An ATHEN Workshop on Implementing Accessibility on Campus - A-Z

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Ron Stewart & Gaeir Dietrich, HTCTU, Terrill Thompson, U. of Washington, Greg Kraus, NC State University, (Moderator: Heidi Scher, U. of Arkansas)

Session Description

This full-day workshop is intended for those who may be just starting to implement accessibility services and policies on their campuses or for those seeking to improve existing policies and services. The session will be divided into segments that include the following topics:

  • 508 & Alternate Format Requirements and Implementation Strategies
  • E-text Production
  • Accessible STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math)
  • Implementing a Campus Web and IT Accessibility Policy
  • Outreach and Education to Faculty about Accessibility

Expertise Level: Beginner

Abstract

Students with disabilities face many challenges in higher education, including challenges related to the accessibility of print, web, multimedia, information technology, and STEM resources. Access technology professionals are often called upon to develop and implement services and policies that address these barriers and equal the playing field. In this full-day workshop participants will explore strategies and best practices for implementing accessibility services and policies on their campuses.

Keypoints

  1. Participants will have examined different alternate media formats and have
    gained an understanding of the resources and strategies available to provide
    those formats to students.
  2. Participants will have gained an understanding of Section 508 and how it
    applies at the state level, as well as learned about current implementation
    strategies at a number of colleges.
  3. Participants will have developed an understanding of the complexities of
    accessible STEM materials and gained an understanding of resources,
    techniques and strategies.
  4. Participants will have examined a variety of higher education
    accessibility policies, and will have discussed qualities that
    constitute an effective policy.
  5. Participants will have examined strategies for how to engage the campus
    community, from faculty to programmers, in order to create a culture
    of accessibility.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
All

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1

Implementation of a Multimedia Accessibility & Captioning Policy: a case study from the University of Illinois

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Angella Anderson, University of Illinois, Liam Moran, University of Illinois

Session Description

If you are considering the need for a campus-wide policy on video captioning, this presentation/discussion on how the University of Illinois collaborated with other departments on campus to plan and disseminate a workable plan for the entire campus. Feel free to share your experiences as well.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

The University of Illinois' Division of Rehabilitation Educational Services began video captioning in 2007, for Deaf and hard of hearing students. Since then, a myriad of issues have had to be dealt with, from many different video formats and copyright issues to educating faculty on the current legislation and many other internal issues. Among discussion points are the difficulties that have arisen in trying to not only manage an overwhelming backlog of video and podcasting captioning needs, but at the same time, educate faculty who feel that their academic freedoms might be infringed upon, and the collaborations that are presently occurring so that a well-thought out, and meaningful plan can be designed that will not only benefit our students with disabilities, but also keep the University of Illinois at the forefront of accessibility. This presentation will also include a demonstration of Illinois' new accessible flash video player, that provides all accessible features, including closed captioning and audio description, and delivers these in a very ingenious fashion that will make providing these accommodations to both deaf and blind students in a much more meaningful way.

Keypoints

  1. Collaborating with Other Departments
  2. Involve all of the Stakeholders
  3. Demonstration and discussion with Liam Moran, designer of the flash player

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1

Implementing Institutional Accessibility: The need for administrative and ground-level support

Jonathan Whiting, WebAIM

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Session Description

This session outlines the importance of an institution-wide approach to web accessibility and provides resources to help you gain commitment from administration, web developers, and others. Resources for institutional self-study, planning, and improvement will also be provided.

Expertise Level: Beginner

Abstract

Web accessibility efforts are much more likely to be successful if you can get support from people throughout your institution, but accessibility efforts are often focused at a single group. Grassroots efforts without buy-in from administration may not be given the necessary resources, while attempts to force accessibility on developers through mandates might be met with resistance and resentment. This session will provide resources to assist in "making the case" for accessibility at all levels. We will also look at tools that help you evaluate your institution's accessibility and create a plan for improvement. Resources for web developers and other web content creators will also be discussed.

Keypoints

  1. Techniques and recommendations to gain support for accessibility
    throughout your institution.
  2. Tools and resources to help you measure your current state of
    accessibility and create an accessibility implementation plan.
  3. Support materials for faculty and staff who are creating content
    for the web.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1

Lecture/Demonstration: Nuts & Bolts of Captioning Digital Multimedia

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Geoff Freed, NCAM-WGBH

Session Description

This session will review various software tools and the step by step processes for captioning multimedia, from the transcription process to the synchronization of captioning and audio.

Expertise Level: Beginner

Abstract

This session will review various software tools and the step by step processes for captioning multimedia, from the transcription process to the synchronization of captioning and audio. We will demonstrate how to use three caption editors (transcription, timing, editing, export).

In addition, this session will talk about other important aspects of captioning, such as style, editing, visual formatting, etc. There will be some coverage of technical formats and standards.

Keypoints

  1. What are the tools, services and processes for creating a transcript for multimedia.
  2. What are the tools for captioning multimedia (i.e. how do we synchronize the transcript to the multimedia?).
  3. What are the best practices and standards for captioning - i.e. style, editing, visual formatting, etc.?

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 0 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1

Rolling Craps on Canvas - Accessible Forms and Graphics with HTML5

Jayme Johnson, High Tech Center Training Unit

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Session Description

Participants will learn about the canvas element and new forms capabilities of HTML 5 by writing an accessible version of the dice game Craps. Draw on the Canvas with JavaScript, use HTML 5 forms to control the action, and use CSS to style the data presented to the player.

Expertise Level: Expert

Abstract

The dice game Craps is used as the framework to teach principles and concepts of HTML 5. Participants will create a playable Craps game using HTML 5 and JavaScript. Participants will learn how to draw on the Canvas element by using JavaScript to create and position graphical elements. Students will learn about new aspects of HTML5 forms as they are used to create an accessible interface for the game. A look at Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and ARIA markup will be included, to provide the finishing touches for the game. Modular session materials of pre-built game logic and JavaScript code will be assembled in text editors and explained before being rendered in popular browsers for usability(playability) testing.

Keypoints

  1. How to use the Canvas element from HTML 5.
  2. Accessibility concerns and capabilities of form elements in HTML 5.
  3. How to build an HTML5 webpage that includes JavaScript and ARIA markup, and is rendered with Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Alternate Formats 101 - the Basics, Jeff Bazer, Dolphin Computer Access, Inc.

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Session Description

The beginner's guide to the types of alternative formats & their suitability to students with learning disabilities, vision impairments, dyslexia and beyond. Walking attendees through the basics, Jeff will create DAISY books, Braille, large print and MP3 learning materials.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This session will introduce the very basics of alternate formats for the alternate media beginner. Working with the requirements of fictional case study students and some real life education materials, attendees will follow Jeff as he walks through the complete creation process. Starting by interpreting the students' requirements, through the various decision points associated with each format and onto the output - storing the MP3 onto an iPod or embossing Braille.
The session will discuss what constitutes high quality alternate formats; as well as examining the different advantages of each format for students with different disabilities.


The session will close by discussing creation tips, legislative compliance, and timely delivery.

Keypoints

  1. Participants will learn what constitutes a high quality alternative format
  2. Participants will learn the advantages of the various alternative formats.
  3. Participants will learn the basics on how to create high quality alternative formats.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1

Dolphin Easy Converter - 1-IN-5-OUT, Julie Balassa, Valencia Community College, Jeff Bazer, Dolphin Computer Access

View in Schedule Handouts/Papers

Session Description

This presentation is a demonstration of Easy Converter's built-in workflow that enables DSS providers, alt format specialists, and anyone who is responsible for the provision of at format to easily and quickly convert one source file to 5 student-ready formats.

Expertise Level: ?

Abstract

Regardless of the size of our institution and our level of expertise, all of us who are responsible for alternate format production and delivery are challenged with effectively and efficiently converting source files to student-ready alternate formats to satisfy individual access preferences and the requirements of the Office of Civil Rights. In this session, we will input a source file into Easy Converter, use the intermediate OCR and MS Word editing options to make sure the files has been marked up according to best practices, and output the edited material in each available alternate format.

Keypoints

  1. Source files must undergo conversion to alternate formats that take into account student preferences and needs as described in Office of Civil Rights requirements
  2. Best practice elements of edited files that are ready for conversion into alternate formats
  3. Steps to convert one edited file to multiple student-ready formats using Dolphin Easy Converter

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1

Alt Format Workflow-Eligibility to Request to Production to Delivery, Julie Balassa, Valencia Community College

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Session Description

Designing an alt format workflow is daunting for many DSS providers who have been tasked with responsibility for alt format but lack time, skills, and experience. This presentation is a description of one alt format workflow that has successfully served students at a large community college.

Expertise Level: Beginner

Abstract

Every institution that serves students with disabilities is responsible for providing access to programs and services in alternate formats. In order to satisfy individual access preferences and the requirements of the Office of Civil Rights, DSS offices must be able to process requests, produce alternate format files, and deliver those files to students in an effective, timely, and accurate manner. In this session, we will take an in-depth look at the efficient and effective alternate format workflow used at a large community college, including determination of eligibility, processing of requests, production, and delivery of alternate format files to the student.

Keypoints

  1. Office of Civil Rights requirement that alternate format files must be timely, accurate, and must suit the manner and medium used by the student
  2. Process analysis of eligibility, request system, production system, delivery system
  3. Incorporation of these considerations into the design of an effective and efficient workflow

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1

Passport to Success for All Students: Mira Costa Community Colleges Universal Design Initiative

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Robert Erichsen, MiraCosta College, Maureen "Mo" Doherty, Texthelp Systems

Session Description

Combination Lecture/Lab, come learn about MiraCosta Community College's innovative program that provides Read&Write GOLD access to ALL students, including students with disabilities. Experience the features of the software and understand how these made multi department/budget purchase possible.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

See how the programs and software used by MiraCosta Community College to develop skilled graduates can be implemented at any school and be instrumental in helping the US reach the goal of having the highest proportion of college graduates in the world. Although all institutions of higher education must support diverse learners, community colleges like MiraCosta are in the unique position of supporting students at every level including incoming freshman, students working on a degree or working to transfer to a four year university, adults working towards a high school diploma or developing employable skills. Basic Skills programs are vital to the success of all students in this environment. Groups who have used this technology, specifically Read&Write GOLD include a "Summer Bridge" program to equip incoming freshman with the study skills necessary to be successful and a "First Year Experience" program that supports new students as a cohort to improve retention rates. Moreover, students in ESL programs at MiraCosta use Read&Write GOLD extensively to improve proficiency. This program was also featured in the Reading Festival held annually and is embraced interdepartmentally as a key component for success. Come join us for a lively session of learning.

Keypoints

  1. Hoe to design, Sell and Support a Campus Universal Design Initiative
  2. Explore Read&Write GOLD--success for ALL
  3. Implementation and On Going Surveys and Statistics

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1

Low Cost No Cost Access Technology Solutions, Ron Stewart, HTCTU

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Session Description

This hands on experience will explore a variety of low cost no cost access technologies that have emerged onto the scene in the last few years. When properly selected these products can provide for a very effective alternative to the much more expensive commercial products on the market.

Expertise Level: Beginner

Abstract

In the last few years a variety of very effective low cost and no cost products have emerged that are very effective at meeting the needs of users of access technologies in a variety of contexts. This presentation will explore a variety of these products and discuss their strengths and limitations as compared to the more commonly used commercial products in use in the educational space.

Keypoints

  1. Understanding the variety of low cost no cost solutions that currently exist.
  2. Understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of these products when compared to their commercial counterparts.
  3. Understanding of the determination process that should be used to make effective access technology decisions for students.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1

Academic Considerations for Mobile Platforms

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Sean Keegan, Stanford University, Jayme Johnson, High Tech Center Training Unit, California Community Colleges

Session Description

Smart phones, iPads, and other tablet devices grow more popular and raise issues of accessibility, pedagogy, and compatibility. Learn the best practices for students and institutions adopting different mobile devices.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Students are arriving on campus with emerging mobile technologies and institutions are left with the inevitable question of how to integrate these solutions into their academic affairs. Providing the appropriate guidance and direction for students who have adopted these platforms requires disability and technology specialists to be familiar with the capabilities and limitations of such mobile technologies. Whether the purpose is to make audio recordings of a class session, assist in taking notes, or convert text materials into auditory formats, students are utilizing emerging mobile devices as their auxiliary aid in order to access their course materials. Familiarity with these new mobile technologies and their capabilities for communication, media playback, and support for alternate formats will enable faculty and staff to more effectively and efficiently interact with students disabilities utilizing these mobile technologies.

Keypoints

  1. Apps that are being used on mobile devices in higher education by students with different accessibility needs
  2. Institutional considerations for media and alternate format creation for broad mobile device compatibility
  3. Accessibility and extensibility capabilities of mobile devices for students with diverse accessibility and/or learning needs

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0

Create Stunning Tactile Graphics with Phoenix and Firebird, LUCIA HASTY, ROCKY MOUNTAIN BRAILLE ASSOCIATES

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Session Description

Scan charts, graphs and diagrams into the Firebird software, and emboss high resolution tactile graphics on the new Phoenix embosser. In this hands-on session participants will use the software, discuss and apply best practices in tactile graphics design, and emboss graphics created in the session.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Creating tactile graphics to support educational materials has traditionally been a time-consuming task, often requiring significant skills in using graphics design software. Firebird, a new software program, allows you to modify and clarify details within a scanned image. The final image is embossed using the Phoenix, a dual-head embosser that provides tactile graphics as well as standard braille text. Participants in this hands-on session will discuss and apply best practices in tactile graphics design, based on the newly released BANA Guidelines and Standards for Tactile Graphics, create a graphic from a scanned image, and emboss the graphic using the Phoenix braille and graphics embosser. Participants are encouraged to bring a sample of print images requested by their students and will have the opportunity to create and produce them as excellent tactile graphics during the lab session.

Keypoints

  1. Attendees will become familiar with design techniques to produce readable tactile graphics.
  2. Attendees will learn to use new software to create tactile graphics.
  3. Attendees will learn to operate new hardware for both braille text and quality tactile graphics.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1

Authoring Math Content for the Web and DAISY, Sean Keegan, Stanford University, Ron Stewart, HTCTU

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Session Description

This session will explore the authoring and production of accessible Math content for use in web based content and digital text environments like DAISY.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

While it is possible to create and present mathematical expressions in digital formats, there are few methods for ensuring the accessibility of science, technology, and math (STEM) content for students using assistive computer technologies. One method is to create mathematical expressions using an equation editor tool and then convert equations into graphics to be placed on the Web page. This requires the addition of alternate text that "linearizes" the equation and poses a risk of miscommunication to individuals using assistive computer technology attempting to "listen" to the equation. A second method involves the use of specific math authoring tools (e.g., MathType and MathDAISY, Scientific Notebook, etc.), specific Web browser plug-ins, and the use of assistive computer technologies and DAISY applications that support MathML-based formats. Implemented properly, the utilization of math authoring tools in conjunction with specific technologies can support a student's access to STEM materials via the Web and other e-text formats.

Keypoints

  1. How to create accessible math content for web based delivery.
  2. How to create accessible math content for use as a DAISY digital talking book.
  3. Recommended work-flows for the production of accessible math and related content.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1

Accessing the World Through a Multi-faceted Integrated Set of Solutions

Bobby Lakey & Pauline Anacki, Freedom Scientific

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Session Description

Join us for a presentation on Freedom Scientific products for the blind, visually impaired and learning disabled. Assistive Technology as it applies to independent living, education and employment, through mainstream technology made accessible.

Expertise Level: Expert

Abstract

In order to achieve success, people with vision loss must learn the ABC's of blindness: assistive technology; Braille; & cane travel. Freedom Scientific and its products drastically empower people with visual and learning challenges in these three areas of confidents and skill building.

Keypoints

  1. Categories of AT for the blind, visually impaired and learning disabled.
  2. Combinations of these products that aid in maximum benefit to the user.
  3. Resources in learning and awareness made available through Freedom Scientific.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0

Accessibility Testing in the Real World, Angela Hooker, Cascades Technologies, Inc.

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Session Description

Building an accessibility test plan doesn't have to be a daunting, or expensive, task. Learn about the best tools and processes to help you deliver an accessible web project or software application.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Accessibility has gained a bad reputation as being expensive and time consuming to implement in web sites and software applications. This prevailing myth is one of the biggest barriers to accessibility. Other critical elements for successful projects include understanding what people with each disability type need; building in accessibility from the project inception; and testing and remediating in increments. Planning carefully, selecting the proper tools, and employing practical methods, testing for accessibility can be fast, inexpensive, and effective.

Keypoints

  1. Building an accessibility test plan;
  2. What elements to test and what techniques to use; and,
  3. Key tools and programs for testing.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1 Universal Access

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1

Recent Developments in OCR Cases--Focusing on Assistive Technology

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James (Jim) Long & Erica Austin, U.S. Dep't of Education, Office for Civil Rights

Session Description

We will present recently decided cases of general interest to disability services personnel at the postsecondary level, with a particular emphasis on cases involving issues related to assistive technology.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Universities' responsibilities to qualified students with disabilities under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, are often misunderstood. We hope to bring some clarification to many of the issues, especially those related to assistive technology and auxiliary aids and services, through a discussion of recent decisions of OCR offices around the country.

Keypoints

  1. Clear understanding of the requirements of the Section 504 and Title II regulations.
  2. Indication of the kinds of questions to be asking of your institutions disabilities services procedures and practices.
  3. Methodologies for resolving issues related to accommodations and auxiliary aids and services.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1

Listen Up…Developing a Comprehensive Achievement Program for Students with Learning Differences and Visual Impairments

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James Higgins & Suzanne Jonsen, Learning Ally (formerly known as Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic)

Session Description

Comprehensive discussion on how to easily and effectively accommodate children k-post grad with specific learning disabilities. Specifically, this session will show how districts and states can customize programs with accessible content and assistive technology tools meeting the needs of their students.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Comprehensive discussion on how to easily and effectively accommodate children k-post grad with specific learning disabilities. Specifically, this session will show how districts and states can customize programs with accessible content and assistive technology tools meeting the needs of their students with visual and learning disabilities. Research by leading institutions such as Johns Hopkins, Rutgers, Tufts and Baltimore City Public Schools show when students with print challenges use audio textbooks: • 76% improve reading comprehension • 52% improve reading accuracy • 61% increase self-confidence

Keypoints

  1. How to develop comprehensive accommodations for students with learning disabilities or visual impairment
  2. How to make sure your school is compliant under IDEA
  3. Lost cost solutions for accommodations for schools and districts

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0

Lync, the new generation of office communication: Are you ready to give up with your office phone?

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Hadi Rangin & Tim Offenstein, University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign

Session Description

In this session we will be demonstrating selected features of Microsoft Lync and discussing with you the accessibility and usability of this tool.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Microsoft defines the Lync as "The Next Generation of Unified Communications." Lync is a powerful communication system that provides Internet Messaging, audio/video conferencing, file sharing, interconnectivity with Microsoft Exchange Server, SharePoint, and potentially application and desktop sharing. Some higher ed institutions have already adopted Lync as their communication systems and some universities like the University of Illinois are in the process of adopting it. What is Microsoft Lync? What can you do with it and how accessible/usable it is? Is it reliable enough to replace our traditional landlines? Does it indeed provide an engaging and collaborative environment for all users including users with disabilities? Tim Offenstein and Hadi Rangin evaluated Microsoft Lync and will be sharing their findings with you. In this session we will be demonstrating selected features of Microsoft Lync and discussing with you the accessibility and usability of this tool.

Keypoints

  1. Learn how MS Lync works and what features it offers.
  2. Learn about Accessibility/Usability challenges (demo).
  3. Learn how we can be part of the solution.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Mobile Accessibility, Challenges, and Best Practices, Hadi Rangin, University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign

View in Schedule

Session Description

In this session we provide an overview on the current state of accessibility of mobile applications. We will also demonstrate some of the accessibility/usability challenges And introduce best practices that could lead to universally accessible mobile applications by default if followed properly.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Mobile technologies can provide unprecedented benefits to persons with disabilities-- they can increase productivity at work and/or school, improve safety, reduce isolation, provide text messaging, text-to-speech and voice recognition, e-mail and calendaring, scanning and read text aloud, GPS navigation and many other useful functions. But how accessible and usable are the mobile applications to users with disabilities? Can users with disabilities benefit from mobile communications technology as much as the rest of the world is doing? What are the challenges for users with disabilities? Are there any best practices for mobile applications? In this session we provide an overview on the current state of accessibility of mobile applications. We will also demonstrate some of the accessibility/usability challenges that users with disabilities are facing with mobile application. And finally, we introduce best practices that could lead to universally accessible mobile applications by default if they are followed properly.

Keypoints

  1. Learn about the status of accessibility/usability of mobile applications.
  2. Learn about accessibility challenges (demonstration).
  3. Learn about Best Practices for Mobile Applications.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Moodle 2 Accessibility: Results from NC State University's Accessibility Evaluation, Greg Kraus, NC State University

View in Schedule

Session Description

This presentation will go over the findings of NC State University's accessibility evaluation of Moodle 2.0. The results include both the student's and the instructor's perspective in using the system.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

NC State University has committed to using the open source learning management sytem, Moodle. As part of the upgrade planning from 1.9 to 2.0 we have performed accessibility and usability tests on Moodle 2.0. In this session we will share the findings of our automated and human assessments of the interface and tools from both the student's and instructor's perspectives. Additionally, we will share the results from our usability study conducted with several students with disabilities at NC State. Lastly, we will discuss how we dealt with any accessibility and usability issues revealed in our analysis.

Keypoints

  1. accessibility features of Moodle 2.0
  2. accessibility issues of Moodle 2.0
  3. ways accessibility issues were handled in Moodle 2.0 as NC State

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Don't Ask, Do Tell: Making Third Party Web Sites Accessible Without the Owners' Help and Educating Owners How to Make Better Sites

Greg Kraus, NC State University

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Session Description

This presentation will demonstrate a browser-based system to make Web sites you do not control more accessible by dynamically altering the page through scripting technologies. This allows sites to be more accessible to users and also to educate site owners how to make their sites more accessible.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Often times we encounter Web sites that are not accessible and the Web site owner is either unaware, unable at the present time, or unwilling to make the changes necessary to make it more accessible. Several scripting technologies exist that allow end users to make dynamic modifications to Web pages in their browser, and these modifications can be applied directly to accessibility issues. If the modifications are stored in a central database, then any end user will be able to apply these changes to their Web pages. For example, a set of modifications can be applied to Facebook's Web site to make it more accessible, and since those changes are stored in a database, any user of Facebook will be able to apply these changes in their browser as well. This presentation will demonstrate a system developed at NC State University that allows the IT Accessibility Office to modify University Web pages from within the end user's browser to make pages more accessible. Along with the accessibility modifications, notes to the site owner can be left within the context of the page to show what techniques need to be applied to make the page more accessible.

Keypoints

  1. how scripting technologies can alter Web sites within the browser
  2. how this tool facilitates educating developers about Web accessibility issues
  3. how this system allows people to view an accessible version of an otherwise inaccessible site

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Practical Accessibility Testing, Glenda Sims, Deque, Wes Dillon, Deque

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Session Description

How do you know if your web site is accessible? Can automated testing tools help? How do you create and manage a culture of accessibility on a large university campus with a shrinking budget? Glenda will share gems from her 10+ years of experience testing sites for accessibility at UT Austin.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

How do you know if your web site is accessible? Can automated testing tools help? How do you create and manage a culture of accessibility on a large university campus with a shrinking budget? Glenda will share gems from her 10+ years of experience testing sites for accessibility. Equip yourself with free and powerful testing tools. Learn how to turn it up a notch when you need to monitor accessibility across a vast enterprise. See some of the very latest testing tools that will help you evaluate color contrast, dynamic content and WAI-ARIA compliance. Glenda Sims is currently a senior accessibility consultant at Deque. She spent over a decade as the accessibility expert and web standards evangelist at the University of Texas at Austin.

Keypoints

  1. New free and powerful accessibility testing tools.
  2. The power of enterprise level accessibility tools in action.
  3. Importance of integrating accessibility testing into the software development life cycle.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 0 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1

Innovations in Accessibility: Designing for Digital Outcasts, Kel Smith, Anikto LLC

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Session Description

Introduced by researchers from the University of Sussex, the term "digital outcasts" describes users with disabilities who are left behind as technology advances. This presentation will explore emerging technologies (mobile apps, games, virtual worlds, etc) as they apply to barrier-free access.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Introduced by researchers from the University of Sussex, the term "digital outcasts" is applied to users with disabilities or illness who are left behind as technology advances. The Web now offers new forms of engagement that bring greater fidelity and complexity to the online space; the very concept of "web accessibility" itself has evolved into something deeply immersive and complex. We as designers now face dynamic challenges and opportunities when providing barrier-free digital experiences. How can virtual worlds, geolocation apps, augmented reality and the 3D Web possibly be adapted to users with special needs, and how do we design for them? This presentation will explore the cultivation of digital innovation on behalf of people with physiological and cognitive disabilities, focusing primarily on the health and life sciences industry. Practical examples will include iPad, Nintendo Wii, haptic interfaces, virtual prosthetics, adaptive therapies, text-to-speech functionality, iPhone games and Second Life.

Keypoints

  1. Review case studies of people with physical and cognitive disabilities using emerging technologies
  2. Recognize how barrier-free accessibility operates within (and in fact drives) other components of innovation
  3. Understand that inclusive design is prioritized by how the body and mind co-habitate within the digital space

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1 Brain Injuries

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1

Impact of Executive Functioning on Online Learning Environments, Jason Maseberg-Tomlinson, Kansas State University

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Session Description

This session will define executive functioning, its role in online education, and help attendees understand what course or online elements affect students most. I will discuss exams, student portal sites, multi-media, and content such as textbooks.

Expertise Level: Beginner

Abstract

Executive functioning (EF) affects a students working memory, impulse control, planning, organization, and other cognitive areas. A majority of students may be affected: language-based learning disabilities, depression, anxiety, ADD, PDD, PTSD, Asperger's to name a few. Disability specialist have been talking about the impact of EF in the classroom for many years but what about online environments such as an online class or college portal? How can we create an environment which takes EF into account and increase accessibility for online-students. This session will define executive functioning, its role in online education, and help attendees understand what course or online elements affect students most. I will discuss exams, student portal sites, multi-media, and content such as textbooks.

Keypoints

  1. Definition of Executive Functioning
  2. Impact on Online Education
  3. Accessible Course Development

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 0 1 Psychological

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1

Digital Image and Graphic Resources for Accessible Materials: the DIAGRAM Center Project

Betsy Beaumon, Benetech, Geoff Freed, WGBH - NCAM View in Schedule Handouts/Papers

Session Description

The mission of the DIAGRAM Center is to transform the creation and consumption of accessible image and graphic content for instructional materials. This presentation is a summary and discussion of the research findings and development work of the Center in its first 18 months of operation.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 2004 (IDEA) requires timely access to educational materials; through projects such as Benetech's Bookshare for Education, access to text has greatly increased. Unfortunately, for graphical content the burden of accessible image preparation typically falls on educators, with limited time and tools to create useful descriptions or accessible graphics for students. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), DIAGRAM (Digital Image and Graphic Resources for Accessible Materials) is a research and development center that will transform the processes and availability of accessible images for students with disabilities. Through rigorous research and testing over a five year period, the DIAGRAM center will help create a set of standards-based tools for producers of accessible instructional materials, such as publishers and state and local education agencies, to expand the field of image description and interactive exploration of graphical content.

Keypoints

  1. The evolution of standards supporting image descriptions and alternatives formats
  2. An open source tool and practices for crowd sourced image descriptions
  3. Ongoing plans for development, testing and dissemination of the Center's work products

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1

Beyond Checklists - Promoting Nonvisual Accessibility through Task-based, First-hand Testing

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Tony Olivero, National Federation of the Blind - NVA Certification Program, Sandra Earl, Desire2Learn

Session Description

Software accessibility testing too often focuses on automated testing and complying with checklists such as the Section 508 VPAT. The National Federation of the Blind and Desire2Learn discuss the benefits of incorporating task-based, firsthand testing into accessibility reviews and certification.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Software accessibility testing too often focuses on automated testing and complying with checklists. Nonvisual Accessibility Certification from the National Federation of the Blind is an opportunity to take a different approach. When defining test cases for certification the NFB works with software vendors to define the core tasks that users perform. The ease at which these tasks can be completed by nonvisual users is the most important measure of how accessible the software is. The NFB will use their certification of Desire2Learn's Learning Environment 9.1 to highlight how task-based testing can greatly improve the overall accessibility of a product. When reviewing Learning Environment 9.1, the NFB completed 15 test cases representing the most common tasks performed by students and instructors using the learning management system. The testing uncovered a number of ease-of-use and discoverability issues that were not detected in the preliminary automated testing. The issues challenged Desire2Learn to use simpler page layouts, better table markup, and ARIA techniques to improve the overall experience for blind and low vision students and instructors.

Keypoints

  1. Automated testing is an important tool for accessibility, but should be used in conjunction with task-based testing
  2. Test cases need to consider the core tasks and experiences of users
  3. Accessibility is not static; software vendors must be encouraged to adopt new techniques that are proven to improve user's experiences

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Web Accessibility: 30 Tips in 60 Minutes, Terrill Thompson, DO-IT, University of Washington

Session Description

This session will provide 30 quick tips for improving accessibility of web resources in higher education. Resources will be provided.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Web design is a rapidly evolving field. Those of us who are responsible for promoting accessible web design face challenges as we struggle to keep up with emerging technologies. This session will compress a wealth of knowledge into one 60 minute session. Attendees will leave with helpful tips and techniques that they can apply to their own web sites or share with web developers on their campuses. Tips will cover images, forms, document structure, dynamic menus, HTML5, ARIA, Javascript libraries, PDF, learning management systems, mobile apps, and dozens of other issues that affect students with disabilities.

Keypoints

  1. Attendees will learn 30 specific tips and techniques for improving web accessibility.
  2. Attendees will leave with a single URL where they can quickly access answers to their web accessibility questions.
  3. Attendees will leave with greater confidence that they can help web developers to improve the accessibility of their web applications.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Got Different File Types? How Bookshare Cracks the Conversion Codes

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Suzy Haines & Cherie Miller, Bookshare/Benetech

Session Description

As EPUB and DAISY merge, how can old files be brought up to date? Starting from scratch? Learn how Bookshare converts different file types to DAISY; the next standard for EPUB.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Many readers with print disabilities prefer the DAISY format that Bookshare provides in all of their books. Several university presses and publishers contract with Bookshare to make their digital files available in DAISY. What is the best way to convert EPUB so can easily be read as a DAISY file? How does Bookshare convert books from so many different formats to DAISY and how can a university AltMedia producer do the same? Join Suzy Haines, Bookshare's Digital Content Manager, as she outlines the book translation technologies she has developed for converting different file formats to DAISY.

Keypoints

  1. Participants will learn how Bookshare converts PDF's and EPUB to DAISY.
  2. Participants will learn the best way to create EPUB so it can be converted to DAISY.
  3. Participants will learn how to bring old files up to date with the new EPUB/DAISY standard.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0

Evaluating web content accessibility - using WAVE to facilitate human evaluation

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Jared Smith, WebAIM, Marisol Miranda, EASI

Session Description

WAVE is a popular and free web accessibility evaluation tool. This session will provide an overview of WAVE (http://wave.webaim.org/) functionality, demonstrate how it can be used in a web accessibility evaluation methodology, and will highlight features of the new version of WAVE.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Web accessibility is about the human experience. Automated tools are very limited in their ability to determine true accessibility. Still, they are very valuable resources in evaluating web content for accessibility. The WAVE evaluation tool by WebAIM is designed to facilitate and aid in human evaluation. This session will provide an overview of how to use WAVE as part of a broader evaluation methodology. The features and advantages of the server version of WAVE (http://wave.webaim.org/) and the WAVE Firefox Toolbar will be highlighted with an emphasis on how participants can best utilize these features in their own evaluation processes. An overview of new WAVE5 features will also be demonstrated.

Keypoints

  1. Gain an overview of the WAVE evaluation tool.
  2. Learn how to use WAVE as part of a broader web accessibility
    evaluation methodology.
  3. Get insight into new and upcoming WAVE functionality and improvements.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1

ARIA and HTML5 Accessibility, Jared Smith & Jonathan Whiting, WebAIM

View in Schedule

Session Description

HTML5 is the newest 'version' of the HTML language. While still in development, HTML5 is being implemented throughout the web. The Accessible Rich Internet Applications (ARIA) specification also provides new and enhanced ways of authoring accessible web content and applications. Together, ARIA and HTML5 provide significant new and innovative mechanisms for web accessibility. This full-day session will provide an overview of implementing both ARIA and HTML5.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

This session will provide a hands-on overview of ARIA (Accessible Rich Internet Applications) and HTML5 markup. It will highlight differences between of HTML5 and current versions of HTML/XHTML. Participants will have an opportunity to 'upgrade' an HTML 4 document to HTML5. It will provide specific, real-world examples of where ARIA and HTML5 are useful and necessary for optimal accessibility. An overview will be provided of support (and the lack thereof) in assistive technologies for these technologies and how this impacts their implementation. Participants will leave with a thorough overview of these languages and how to implement them in their own web pages and applications.

Keypoints

  1. Gain an overview of HTML5 and ARIA markup.
  2. Learn how and when to implement HTML5 and ARIA in today's web applications.
  3. Get insight into the power and limitations of these technologies.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1

What's New with WYNN? Introducing WYNN 6!, Steve Boyle, Freedom Scientific Learning Systems Group

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Session Description

Freedom Scientific introduces WYNN 6, the next generation of literacy software. WYNN 6 offers exciting new features and functions, giving the user even better flexibility with reading while not sacrificing the ease of use that WYNN is noted for.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Freedom Scientific Learning Systems Group presents WYNN, a robust, literacy software program that can assist anyone who struggles with reading, regardless of age. The program can be personalized to meet the individual accommodations of the user and is regarded as the most user-friendly software of its type. WYNN can import content from any source, both hard copy and electronic, as well as access and read the internet. WYNN 6, released in the spring of 2011, offers technological advances that build on the WYNN program without sacrificing any of the ease of use WYNN is noted for. These include the ability to read mathematics, high-speed portable scanning, and expanded forms of content presentation allowing more personalization for the user as well as even greater flexibility in accessing a wealth of diverse content.

Keypoints

  1. New Features and Functions of WYNN 6
  2. Utilization of the Pearl Camera with WYNN 6
  3. WYNN 6 and ongoing future development

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

Integrating Accessibility into the Design of Online Learning Management Systems: Theories and Practice

Nantanoot Suwannawut, Indiana University

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Session Description

This presentation will provide an overview of accessible e-learning and it theoretical frameworks, and then propose recommendations informing design of the web-based learning management systems that can help to improve the accessibility and usability for users with disabilities.

Expertise Level: Beginner

Abstract

At the present time, many academic institutions around the world are utilizing and investing in online learning systems. However, educators and developers rarely consider the learning needs of individuals with disabilities. This presentation reveals accessibility approaches that inform the e-learning practices. A thorough analysis of existing models and their applications is interpreted using a proposed design framework for the online learning management systems for students with disabilities. The concept of universal design is also incorporated into the online management learning systems to improve usability and accessibility. The presentation concludes with comprehensive evaluation methods of the proposed design systems.

Keypoints

  1. General concepts of accessible e-learning and their applications to current practices.
  2. Ideas of online learning systems that designers and developers can incorporate into systems development.
  3. Comprehensive evaluation methodologies in testing accessibility of e-learning applications.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 1 0 1

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Global Public Inclusive Infrastructure: Input from Higher Education

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Clayton Lewis, CU-Boulder, Jim Tobias, Inclusive Technologies

Session Description

GPII (gpii.org) is an enhancement to our broadband infrastructure to allow users to use the access features they need anywhere, anytime, on any device. This session will be a focus group discussion of GPII.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

GPII (gpii.org) is an enhancement to our broadband infrastructure to allow users to use the access features they need anywhere, anytime, on any device. This session will be a focus group discussion of GPII. Some scenarios in education are included in a video that will introduce the GPII proposal to participants. For example, GPII is intended to make access services available and personally configured to any student's needs, on any campus computer, not just on a student's own computer, or on computers in a dedicated lab. Following the video, the group will discuss how GPII can be useful in addressing the accessibility challenges faced by students and institutions, and how the proposed approach can be enhanced to better address these challenges. GPII is a large, international effort. Input from this focus group will be very valuable in helping direct this effort in a direction of maximum benefit to higher education.

Keypoints

  1. will learn about the GPII project
  2. will contribute ideas for shaping GPII to serve the needs of students and institutions in higher education
  3. will learn from others about possible uses of GPII technology in higher education

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 0 1 Motor

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

Veterans with Hearing Loss: Access to Education and a Better Life

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Sharaine Rawlinson Roberts, MSW, Caption First, Allen Ford, Lt. USA (Ret.), Rochester Institute of Technology

Session Description

Hearing loss is an invisible disability. Veterans, like most people who experience hearing loss, do not know how to overcome their new disability. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) has opened doors to many students and employees.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Hearing loss is an invisible disability. Veterans, like most people who experience hearing loss, do not know how to overcome their new disability. They often feel embarrassed, isolated, frustrated and angry. Depression is a common side-effect of hearing loss because the veterans become isolated from other people around them. Powerlessness is not something that veterans are accustomed to; these men and women have been trained to handle battles and how to deal with the unexpected. Unfortunately, no one has taught them how to prepare for the possible onset of significant hearing loss. Faced with communication issues from an invisible disability that impacts personal, social, and professional interactions, these veterans are challenged to move forward as they transition to a new norm for interacting in a hearing world that often finds conversations with them an inconvenience, impossible if these veterans cannot use a telephone. Fortunately, technological advances exist to enable veterans to access spoken language.

Keypoints

  1. Statistics on proliferation of hearing loss in U.S. Veterans, including Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom.
  2. How remote Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) works.
  3. Personal experiences of Lt. Ford who lost his hearing due to service related illness.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1

Accessible Text Production: What has been successful for George Mason University

Liz Miller & Kara Zirkle, George Mason University

View in Schedule

Session Description

This lecture encourages attendee participation as we share our history, current processes and personal experiences in providing accessible text to current and future students. We allow for group discussion to share ideas, solutions, problems, etc. involving accessible text.

Expertise Level: Beginner

Abstract

We will highlight some examples of how various Assistive Technology (AT) and alternative formats have enabled students with specific disabilities to have access to their required course materials. Our office creates a limited amount of Braille, tactile and large print materials for students, and we will provide an overview of the equipment, software and resources that assist us in that process. Most of our clients use electronic text; therefore, we will focus much of our production discussion on resources used in scanning and Optical Character Recognition (OCR). Included in this discussion will be resources students may use with the electronic text we produce and resources that allow students to work with text more independently. Online repositories of public domain works and commercial sites where students may obtain texts in electronic format are multiplying rapidly. However, depending on the needs of the student, these may or may not be accessible. Organizations such as Recordings for the Blind and Dyslexic (RFB&D) and Bookshare currently provide free individual memberships to eligible students. In the midst of expanding options and resources, requests for accessible text are growing. Publisher resources such as AccessText and Publisher Look-Up Service currently provide quick access to PDF files for many titles. While the files may not be accessible for all students, these resources allow accessible text providers a streamlined format for contacting and obtaining permissions from publishers. The files may then be converted to accessible formats using OCR software, saving time from physical scanning and money for institutions which may not be able to afford high speed scanners. Our presentation will conclude with a look at what we are able to provide today. We will facilitate a discussion with participants about how we provide accessible text services and how needs and resources have changed on each of our campuses in recent years. Sharing both difficulties and solutions, along with past and current technologies and needs, will enable us to anticipate creative and practical solutions for the future.

Keypoints

  1. Various solutions for alternative text including various assistive technology and how it is provided on campus and to students at home.
  2. Problems/solutions that may be unique to certain classes or disabilities.
  3. Comparison of materials and resources for best practices.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0

Equal Opportunity Education: An Accessibility Imperative, Shannon Urban, Blackboard Collaborate

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Session Description

Accessibility isn't just "nice to have." It's an imperative that's key in supporting a 21st century teaching and learning environment that provides equal opportunity education for all.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Accessibility isn't just "nice to have." It's an imperative, especially for those of us who provide technology-based products and services. At Blackboard Collaborate, we believe that accessibility is key in supporting a 21st century teaching and learning environment. And the goal of this learning environment should be to improve and extend access to education, while providing a richer, more interactive experience for all, regardless of geography, economic status, or ability. It's in the mutual best interest of the higher education and IT vendor communities to work collaboratively to facilitate a user-driven technology development process that identifies priorities, makes products better for everyone, including those with disabilities, and results in solutions that create a culture of access for an inclusive learning and working environment. Higher education consumers worldwide benefit from product improvements that present opportunities for and remove barriers from learning.

Keypoints

  1. Why an accessibility imperative is key in creating and supporting a 21st century teaching and learning environment that provides equal opportunity education for everyone.
  2. How academic institutions can collaborate with vendors to drive technology development, resulting in richer, more interactive experience for all, regardless of geography, economy, or ability
  3. What features and functionality can eliminate barriers to meeting individual needs and learning styles, enabling a wider range of users to fully engage and participate, including those with disabilities.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1

Access Equals Success: Job Listings on NFB-NEWSLINE® Create a Foundation for Opportunity

Renee West, National Federation of the Blind

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Session Description

Participants will learn about the new job-listings feature available on NFB-NEWSLINE® that provides easy and independent access to hundreds of thousands of listings. Special attention will be paid to how this feature can play a vital role in helping those they serve achieve their vocational goals.

Expertise Level: Beginner

Abstract

As a vocational rehabilitation professional, you know that it is essential for blind individuals to keep abreast of news stories affecting their communities and the industries in which they work so as to be successful in their careers. NFB-NEWSLINE® has always provided print-disabled individuals with the ability to be aware of news and events important to their careers, and with the ground-breaking provision of job listings, NFB-NEWSLINE® is equipped to be of even more assistance to blind job seekers and those who assist them in their vocational goals. The ability of blind people to easily access job listings is a crucial part of reducing their current 70 percent unemployment rate, as access to job listings is an integral element to obtaining a job.

Keypoints

  1. Participants will learn about the new job-listings feature, both in its specific attributes and in its use.
  2. Participants will learn how NFB-NEWSLINE® can serve as a critical partner in the achievement of a successful outcome, and as a vital element in the partnership of counselor and customer.
  3. Participants will gain an understanding of the function and functionality of NFB-NEWSLINE®, and the of the various access methods available.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 1 1 1 All print-disabled individuals

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0

Networked AT in the Higher Ed Environment, Dan Comden, University of Washington

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Session Description

Networked delivery of AT at the University of Washington will be discussed, including a description of tools and techniques used, problems encountered, and future plans.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Has AT provision in higher education been solved? Oftentimes such provision has often meant segregated settings or standalone workstations. Providing AT on all workstations within a computing facility not only improves access for students with disabilities, it also increases visibility of accessibility issues and topics. Also, with estimates of 20-50% of students with disabilities NOT receiving services through a DSS office, it enables a significant "unknown" population to use accessible software tools and resources. What about the plethora of portable devices that students are using? Do we provide accessibility for personally-owned devices? What about smart phones (and not-so-smart phones) and touch pads? What applications serve the greatest number of students? Which ones cause the most headaches for IT staff? These are all questions this session will cover, with the latest news and techniques. This session will provide an overview of methods used to deploy a comprehensive range of AT applications across hundreds of computers in many computer lab locations at a large research university. Feedback and discussion will be encouraged. Time permitting, delivery of AT via virtual computing will be demonstrated.

Keypoints

  1. Best practices for AT provision in a networked environment
  2. Common solutions, problems and approaches used
  3. Future issues

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1

Information Technology & Disabilities Ejournal: History and Future

Norman Coombs & Beth Coombs, EASI

View in Schedule

Session Description

The Information & Disabilities Ejournal started in 1994 and ran till 2005. This will be available at the presentation on CD. After lagging for a couple years, ITD is being revived and will be an excellent mechanism for professionals to distribute work over the Internet

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Information Technology and Disabilities is a free, peer-reviewed e-journal which ran continuously from 1994 through 2005 and, according to Google Scholar, its 193 articles were widely referenced by authors. It was originally delivered by email and gopher but quickly moved to the Web. While the vast majority of the authors were from the US, others came from Canada, England, Ireland, Australia, and Hungary. ITD published special issues on accessible STEM, libraries, online learning and k-12 issues. The Gale Group Inc. contracted for the right to carry ITD with its ejournal collection and pays EASI per article downloaded from its site. Because the ITD editors and reviewers were all volunteers, maintaining its operation faded, and it has not been published since 2005. However, during 2011 the previous editors and other concerned professionals, believing the journal had filled an important niche, began exploring ways to breathe new life into it.

Keypoints

  1. Value of peer-reviewed ejournal
  2. Plans to revive ITD
  3. Soliciting articles and volunteer workers

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Plain Language: Accessible Content for POUR Writers, Angela Hooker, Cascades Technologies, Inc.

View in Schedule

Session Description

Content is still king: While we've moved on to new web technologies, effective, accessible communication is as important as accessible features are. Learn universal, plain language principles and writing tips, to deliver your message successfully to a wide audience.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

The challenges of writing web content are similar to preparing print materials. People scan rather than read; and there are people with cognitive impairments, low literacy, low language proficiency, and dyslexia. There's also the added issue of perception of shapes, direction, color, sound, etc. These considerations make it challenging to reach a wide audience. Ineffective, complex content is common on the web. Using complex content is justified by citing user statistics and demographics. While content providers should consider their current audience, if they hope to increase their user base, it's critical that they revise their content-to make it understandable and accessible-to attract more users. Accessible content increases user retention and site loyalty, and reinforces brand trustworthiness. Further, following best practices and principles of plain language reduces user frustration, boosts reading ease, and widens a site's audience. Consequently, accessible content supports the goal of providing universal access for all.

Keypoints

  1. The challenges presented by different abilities and situations;
  2. The benefits of plain language and accessible content; and,
  3. How to write for universal access.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 0 1 Universal Access/Content

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

Accessible digital textbooks in the mobile learning environment

Stephen Acker, OhioLINK, Ken Petri, Ohio State University View in Schedule Handouts/Papers

Session Description

Presentation focuses on student experiences with current eReader devices (iPad, Kindle, Netbooks) and digital textbooks rendered in popular formats (ePub, VitalSource, Daisy, mobi). Data were collected from 50 students with print disabilities across five Ohio Universities.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Students with print disabilities should derive benefits from mobile access to their learning materials (e.g., textbooks) delivered on eReaders such as the Apple iPod, Amazon Kindle, Android platforms, and laptops/netbooks equal to those of other students. This presentation shares an evaluation of the mobile learning environment for students with print disabilities. We will report on the outcomes of a five-campus research project that provided students with print disabilities textbooks on eReaders. Students kept 10-week diaries of the strengths and weaknesses of these mobile learning platforms and also shared their study procedures with a usability expert at the end of the academic term. We'll describe features of the mobile learning environment that are being successfully addressed with current technology-based solutions, as well as areas that need to improve in the next versions of eReaders and digital formats for eBooks.

Keypoints

  1. How students with print disabilities experience mobile learning environments.
  2. Which of the several prominent digital text formats currently best serve students with print disabilities.
  3. Which eReaders currently provide the best mobile learning experience for students with print disabilities.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Access to Foreign Language Learning, Cath Stager-Kilcommons, CU, Jeffrey Dell*, Cleveland State University

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*Jeffrey Dell will participate virtually using teleconferencing software

Session Description

Creation of alternate format accommodations for foreign languages, including more challenging ones such as Russian, Hindi and Asian language courses like Japanese, will be examined with an emphasis on students who are blind or have print disabilities. Success stories will also be included.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Creating access to foreign language learning is a challenging, time-consuming process. Come hear success stories as well as learn best practices developed in two very different higher education institutions. Working in MS Word, we will demonstrate how to set up multiple languages for editing, text entry, and conversion to Braille or other formats. How can students with blindness even learn obscure old notations such as Gregorian Chant notation?

Keypoints

  1. Best practices developed for access to foreign language
  2. Tools and resources available through Windows and MS Word.
  3. Accessing SAPI voices in other languages.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1

Making Tactile Graphics, Clara Van Gerven, National Federation of the Blind

View in Schedule

Session Description

This presentation will provide an overview of how to create tactile graphics, and will compare the merits of different software and hardware packages available for making and using tactile graphics.

Expertise Level: Beginner

Abstract

This presentation will provide an overview of how to create tactile graphics, and will compare the merits of different software and hardware packages available for making and using tactile graphics. With the help of demos and sample images, the features and issues of different production methods will be highlighted. Topics will include importing images, manipulating images for production, print and Braille output, integrating tactile graphics in Braille texts and different ways of using the graphic and embedding information. The discussion will also cover what types of images translate best into a tactile format. The focus will be on the software-based production types, such as ViewPlus's products and Reprotronics' Tactile Graphics Designer, but these will also be compared to other methods to create raised-line drawings.

Keypoints

  1. Attendees will learn some principles for designing a good tactile graphic
  2. Attendees will get an introduction to the use of the ViewPlus Tiger software
  3. The use of Swellform paper and a variety of tactile graphics production methods will be explained

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

Mentoring in Second Life: Accommodation Strategies, Robert Todd, Georgia Tech/CATEA

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Session Description

The NSF BreakThru project provides virtual mentioring for secondary and post-secondary students through the Georgia STEM Accessibility Alliance. This presentation explores accommodation challenges and strategies for students with disabilities receiving individual and group mentoring in Second Life.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Students with disabilities in STEM subjects can benefit from individual and group mentoring services to promote success in their educational experiences, including the transitions between secondary and post-secondary education. Virtual worlds have seen increasing use as educational tools, but have been little studied as a means for broad mentoring services with these students. The NSF BreakThru project focuses upon Second Life as a means of providing mentoring services for students with a broad range of disabilities. This requires researchers to explore, test and implement a range of accommodation stategies in order to address the cognitive, sensory, dexterity and behavioral needs of students. BreakThru is in the process of implementing these accommodations and documenting them so the project can be used as replicable and scalable model for other institutions and programs. This presentation provides a progress report on those efforts.

Keypoints

  1. Challenges in implementation of a virtual world mentioring environment.
  2. Specific accommodations to the Second Life environment required to meet student needs.
  3. Programmatic approaches to achieve success in mentoring goals through the Second Life environment.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1

Roles and Responsibilities, Who is Really Responsible for Accessibility and How Can We Help?

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Kara Zirkle, George Mason University, Liz Miller, George Mason University

Session Description

This presentation explains the way the Assistive Technology Initiative at George Mason University breaks down Accessibility, and the roles and responsibilities throughout campus. Who is responsible for what and how it can be a group effort to get things completed.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Our office is able to provide various services such as computer, AT and ergonomic assessments, alternative text formats, web and document accessibility, multimedia and our beginning process for Universal Design. We have been successful by partnering with other Mason offices to build stronger bonds throughout campus. The major question that is asked during trainings, awareness events, etc. is "Who is responsible?", "What role do I play?", "I don't work with or know anyone who has a disability, why is this important to me?" This is a breakdown answering these various questions from the Provost Office to a faculty, staff or student.

Keypoints

  1. Review the different disabilities and explain common barriers and possible solutions
  2. Break down responsibilities between developers, content managers, directors, administration offices, etc.
  3. Give examples and resources to help those who make an effort to add accessibility into their work plan

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 1

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Voice to text - "Successes and Challenges." Philip Hyssong, Alternative Communication Services

View in Schedule

Session Description

This workshop will focus on successes and failures that have been learned through the use of CART and Text Interpreting services. In many cases the lessons learned, both good and bad, have humorous elements that will be relayed to participants.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

CART and Text Interpreting is becoming a common place accommodation in many colleges and universities around the country. We are seeing a continued increase and with increases come challenges as well as successes.

Remote Text Interpreting and Remote CART services will be demonstrated and dissected live as part of this workshop.

Furhter, this workshop will focus on different stories and events that highlight successes and failures and the lessons learned through each of these events. Sometimes professors put microphones in their pockets! Sometimes students don't show up to class. Sometimes students try to sell transcripts. All these issues are real and can be discussed in an effort to develop successful service strategies within your school or organization.

This workshop is generic in that no one service or company is highlighted, but the information shared can be applied to any class, any school and any provider. Variations of this workshop have been shared and well received by different audiences around the country.

Keypoints

  1. identify at least 2 ways to work with the difficult professor.
  2. identify at least 2 ways to motivate the unmotivated student.
  3. verbalize the pros and cons of using text services as equal access services for students with hearing loss.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 0 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

CLOCKWORK DATABASE SCHEDULER - ACADEMIC

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Robert E. Kindya, University of South Florida, Michael Dinunzio, Technopro Computer Solutions Inc., Barouch Chai, Microcomputer Science Centre, Inc.

Session Description

ClockWork is a powerful group scheduling software designed for University and College disability counseling centres. Meetings, counseling appointments, schedules, exams / tests, workshops, events, rooms and resources are easily entered and tracked, eliminating confusion and conflicts.

Expertise Level: Expert

Abstract

ClockworkDatabase Schedular: Come learn how counsellors and students can benefit from using Clockwork to streamline the management disabled students' needs in the Post Secondary world. The ClockWork Scheduler is a secure, multi-purpose, scheduling & tracking database system currently in use in many Colleges and Universities in Canada and the United States. ClockWork helps accessibility offices, student service centres and other departments to computerize student data so that they can organize, manage and assist special needs students in the post secondary world. Under one networkable software, clockwork allows counselors to share information in an intuitive, flexible and customizable environment. The ClockWork software features online test and exam scheduling, a tutoring module, a note-taking module, plus the ability to interface with any post-secondary database or calendar system, not to mention valuable statistics / reports generation, and much, much more.

Keypoints

  1. Attendees will learn how Clockwork can be used to manage student accomodations, test taking appointments and related information.
  2. Attendees will learn how student case information can be tracked and reported.
  3. Attendees will discover how Clockwork can be custom configured to their school's specific needs.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 0 0 0 1

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1

Service Animals & Disability Rights Laws, Candice Alder, Meeting the Challenge, Inc.

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Session Description

Participants will be given updated information on the ADA as it pertains to service animals, as well as guidance on how the other disability rights laws impact service animal handlers.

Expertise Level: Intermediate

Abstract

This session discusses the new DOJ changes to the definition of a service animal and discusses implementation of several new policy changes that every entity covered under Titles II and III, & people with disabilities should know. This session also provi

Keypoints

  1. New changes to the ADA & Service Animals
  2. Service animal provisions under IDEA, DOT Regs, FHA and other laws.
  3. Common issues surrounding service animals & tips for implementation/self-advocacy.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Effective Communication & the ADA: What's new?, Candice Alder, Meeting the Challenge, Inc.

View in Schedule

Session Description

This session will cover ADA requirements for post-secondary institutions for effective communication with individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, low vision, or have speech impairments. This session will also address the new changes to the ADA's effective communication requirements.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Under the ADA, post-secondary institutions must ensure that communications with individuals with disabilities are as effective as communication with others. In order to provide equal access, postsecondary entities are required to provide auxiliary aids and services that promote effective communication. Examples of auxiliary aids and services include: qualified readers, interpreters, captioning, TTY, video remote interpreting, phone & video relay, large print materials, Braille materials, and computer software. This session will discuss ADA requirements, and common questions as well as common solutions when providing effective communication.

Keypoints

  1. ADA & effective communication requirements
  2. Examples of integrating auxiliary aids
  3. Tools and ADA resources

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 0 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Developing Student Leaders in the ADA: ADA Requirements for Postsecondary Institutions and Empowering Students with Disabilities

Sandy Lahmann, Meeting the Challenge, Inc.

View in Schedule

Session Description

This session will include ADA requirements for postsecondary institutions and strategies for training and empowering students with disabilities utilizing the ADA.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Postsecondary students with disabilities are often misinformed regarding their rights and responsibilities under the ADA. This lack of understanding can lead to problems for the student and their higher education institution. Training the student in the A

Keypoints

  1. ADA requirements for post-secondary institutions
  2. IDEA vs. ADA and transition considerations
  3. Tools & ADA resources

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

The Americans with Disabilities Act: State & Local Governments (Title II) Requirements, Sandy Lahmann, Meeting the Challenge, Inc.

View in Schedule

Session Description

This session will provide an overview of the Title II requirements applicable to state and local governmental entities which includes state funded educational programs. Assorted handouts and other resources will be highlighted and available to participants.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

ADA & Title II: This session will examine the specific requirements of state and local government entities under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act as well as cover the new changes to the Title II & III regulations.

Keypoints

  1. Self-evaluation and transition plans
  2. Designated ADA coordinator
  3. Requirements of state & local government entities to provide program access

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 1 1 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Production of Accessible Professional Journals*

*(Originally posted under the title: "Building a Journal in an Alternative Format")

Ron Stewart, Chair - Instructional Materials Accessibility Group, Association on Higher Education and Disability [Dolphin Track] View in Schedule Handouts/Papers

Session Description

Discover an efficient process for turning traditionally published professional journals into a system that results in a traditional version as well as variety of fully accessible options.

Expertise Level:

Abstract

The Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD) recently made the decision to move the production of their traditional print journal to a system that provides the production of the original version as well as a variety of fully accessible digital formats. This presentation will take participants through the process that was developed, some of the challenges and successes discovered and the tools used to create a fully accessible professional journal. While this work could have been outsourced to a variety of commercial conversion agencies we felt that this option would provide the level of quality control over the process that was desired. It also was determined to be cost prohibitive and an unsustainable solution for a small professional organization. The effort that we took on was to look at both commercial and open source software products to develop a solution that once fully developed, could be used by non-technical staff members to produce the journal on an ongoing basis. The actual task was to take the prepress file created in Adobe InDesign, develop a system that would provide for the same, or a very similar, hard copy edition and also produce a variety of fully accessible digital versions that could be accessed through AHEAD's member website. Now that we have been successful in our efforts it is our conclusion that this model can be easily adopted by many small professional journal publishers to meet the challenge of producing accessible publications.

Keypoints

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices

Read & Write 10: Old Friends and New Features

View in Schedule Handouts/Papers Robert Beach, Kansas City Kansas Community College, Gaeir Dietrich, HTCTU

Session Description

Read&Write 10 has many of the features we all know and love, but new features have been added as well. This session will review old friends and visit new ones.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

This session will review many of the most commonly used features of Read&Write. Then the new features of version 10 will be explored and discussed.

Keypoints

  1. Review of commonly used R&W features
  2. What new features are available in version 10
  3. various licensing options for campuses

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 1 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0

Reading, writing with multi-sensor tools made Easy. ClaroRead, Dragon Naturally Speaking, Livescribe and Audio Note Taker

Barouch Chai, Microcomputer Science Centre Inc.

View in Schedule

Session Description

Reading, writing with multi-sensor tools made Easy. ClaroRead, Dragon Naturally Speaking, Livescribe and Audio Note Taker. Participants will experience new ways of integrating tools to create a process in reading. Reading comprehension and writing with audio.

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Reading, writing with multi-sensory tools made Easy ClaroRead, Dragon Naturally Speaking, LiveScribe and Audio NoteTaker Participants will experience new ways of integrating tools to create a process in reading, Reading comprehension and writing with audio. Once a document is scanned into the computer, ClaroRead reads the document for you using the text to audio features available. ClaroRead can read back menus, button text and tooltips, as well as any text displayed on screen. Dragon Naturally Speaking is ideal for creating documents and emails through speech to text. The benefit of the hands free navigation through the use of Dragon combined with the power of ClaroRead provides a complete reading and writing solution - all by speaking. ClaroRead is used to read any text while setting up Dragon during the Audio Setup Wizard and the New User Wizard. Once the text has been dictated using Dragon, ClaroRead can edit and correct any mistakes or improve the overall content of the document. Text can be converted and saved as audio or video files which are valuable for multi-sensory learning. LiveScribe pen is used by the student to take notes in the classroom. The pen records what you write and hear, and then loads your notes onto your computer to keep digital copies of your written notes (j-peg) and an audio (wav, mp3). The pen is ideal for students with writing challenges where they can record lecture notes, seminars and meetings. They will literally not miss a word! When combined with the power of using the LiveScribe as a digital recorder with Dragon, you create a revolutionary tool for note-taking, by accurately transcribing the audio from the pen into text. Audio files created from both ClaroRead and the LiveScribe pen can be edited in Audio NoteTaker, a software program which makes it easy to create comprehensive notes. During this section of the workshop, we will explore how one can import audio file and edit them. A three hour recording of a class can be edited to a forty-five minute summary session. Join us in this exciting workshop and learn how to creatively mingle four powerful programs together that facilitate new literacy and learning strategies.

Keypoints

  1. Attendees will learn the basics of ClaroRead, Dragon Naturally Speaking, LiveScribe and Audio NoteTaker programs.
  2. Attendees will experience new methods of integrating tools to create a process in reading, Reading comprehension and writing with audio.
  3. Attendees will discover how the integration of these programs can benefit students within the classroom.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

PDF to MP3 in Seconds - Done!, Jeff Bazer, Dolphin Computer Access

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Session Description

Creating MP3s needn't be daunting! It's easier than you think to turn PDF documents into MP3s for playback on your students' iPods or MP3 player. Experience accessibility that is more than a PDF with a screen reader!

Expertise Level: All Levels

Abstract

Join Dolphin's Jeff Bazer as he demonstrates the simple stages involved in converting a real life PDF into a fully accessible and portable MP3. Using a single software tool, EasyConverter, Jeff will walk DSS officers through the step by step stages, from inputting the PDF through to adding synthesized narration. Learn how to develop single or multiple track MP3s, as well as how to select the reader's preferred voice, speed and pitch.

Using the inbuilt lexicon facility, the audience will be showed how commonly mispronounced words can be trained to deliver correct pronunciation, ensuring the highest quality audio. The newly created MP3 edition of the learning material can then be saved to an MP3 player, burnt to CD or shared via the college Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Allow your students to experience learning on the move, with MP3 editions of their learning materials.

Keypoints

  1. The various steps involved in converting PDFs to MP3.
  2. Using a lexicon to ensure correct pronunciation.
  3. How to send your MP3 to an iPod or MP3 player.

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
0 1 1 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1
marker

Captioning Strategy, Glenda Sims, Deque

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Session Description

What is captioning? What are state, federal, international requirements for captions? How can I do captioning on a shoestring?

Expertise Level: ?

Abstract

This session is a crash course on legal requirements and strategies for captioning video. Glenda will also share best practices, resources, and tips to help you produce and publish online videos that reach your target audiences without excluding anyone.

Keypoints

  1. ?
  2. ?
  3. ?

Disability Areas

Deaf / HOH Cognitive / Learning Vision Mobility Other Other desc.
1 0 0 0 0

Topic Areas

Legal Web & Media Acccess Alternate Format Campus Policy Assistive Technology Information Resource Curriculum Access Best Practices
1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1